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Think You Know Dog Drool? Meet These 5 Deliciously Drooly Breeds

Dog drool is nothing new — but some breeds like the Bloodhound and the Mastiff take slobber to the next level.

Lynn M. Hayner  |  Jul 20th 2017


My mixed breed dog, Qual, rarely drooled. But he revved up his salivating engine full throttle when meeting a white pet rat. Some dogs seldom drool, except when they smell favorite foods, or when (more seriously) they are indicating a medical condition. Other breeds, however, normally, happily and healthily slobber up a storm. Read on to discover five such breeds that take dog drool to new heights:

Drooly Dog Breed #1: Saint Bernard

Saint Bernard dogs. Photography Courtesy Jann Hayes.

Saint Bernard dogs. Photography Courtesy Jann Hayes.

Let’s start with the saintly significance of saliva. Saliva serves important purposes, such as moisturizing the mucous membranes in our mouths. What you all call dog drool is simply the result of the shape of my mouth, which allows saliva to pool and then spill. With my loose facial skin, how am I supposed to hold the drool in my mouth? Now let’s talk about my courageous history. We may not actually have carried brandy casks to weary trekkers, but the image lends to the drama, doesn’t it? We’re famous for accompanying monks on snowy searches and rescuing travelers. Of course, we’re also renowned for swinging our spittle up to the ceiling when we shake our heads!

Drooly Dog Breed #2: Bassett Hound

A Basset Hound.

A Basset Hound. Photography Courtesy Jennie Hibbert.

Everyone appreciates our delightful facial folds and saggy skin, but we were bred to excel in hunting and tracking. Our adorability is simply frosting on the cake. The same loose facial skin that helps us trap scent particles when we track contributes to saliva falling out of our mouths. Although we make a normal amount of saliva, our big heads, droopy cheeks and loose lips let that dog drool fly. After all, we can’t spit in specific directions like people. Instead, we tend to fling our saliva here and there. May I suggest a drool rag?

Drooly Dog Breed #3: Dogue de Bordeaux

A Dogue de Boredeaux dog.

A Dogue de Boredeaux dog. Photography by GlobalP/Thinkstock.

As depicted in the popular movie Turner and Hooch, yes, we drool. But I hear they supplemented Hooch’s drool with egg whites on the set. My drool may waterfall down my face, fly out in ropey strands or pool up on the floor. Some of my owners resort to a bib, but I simply advise wiping my muzzle after I eat or drink, and keeping your sense of humor. As for us, we were bred thousands of years ago in France. We were developed as a multi-purpose dog: hunting boar, protecting homes and herding cattle. There’s nothing tidy about living with a drooly breed like us, but our companionship and protective nature more than compensate for the slobber.

Drooly Dog Breed #4: Mastiff

Mastiff dogs.

Mastiff dogs. Photography Courtesy Giselle Nevada.

Friendly and calm, I’m an ancient breed connected to Babylonians, Marco Polo and Hannibal. Bred to guard and fight beside soldiers, we were developed for strength and an imposing presence. Does drool add to the image? Perhaps not, but drool is part and parcel to our big heads and loose lips. We’re generally relaxed companions these days, ready for a picnic or the adventure of your choice. Keep drool napkins nearby if your adventure is indoors; we can leave unprecedented strings of slobber.

Drooly Dog Breed #5: Bloodhound

A Bloodhound.

A Bloodhound. Photography Courtesy Deborah Thompson.

Our origins are blue-blooded, so let’s not over focus on our extra spittle. Our stellar sense of smell made us a favorite with European noble huntsman. We were subsequently employed by gentry to track poachers. In the United States, law enforcement officials asked for our assistance with tracking. But yes, you should always keep dribble scraps handy for cleanup. I myself drool slightly more when I’m nervous. Some say we males drool more than the females due to our extra-large lips. I suggest we forget about my dog drool and pay attention to my gentle, wise and noble expression.

Read more about dog breeds on Dogster.com: