When You Have To Rehome Your Dog

Share on facebook
Facebook
Share on twitter
Twitter
Share on linkedin
LinkedIn
Share on pinterest
Pinterest
Share on email
Email

What happens when you become seriously ill or have a big life change (divorce/job loss) and have to move into a pet-unfriendly location? You look to friends and family to take in your beloved pup, but no one can step up. So, who can you turn to? That’s where the nonprofit pet adoption site Adopt-a-Pet.com’s new program, Rehome, comes in.

Related: What Do You Do When a Dog Really Needs to Be Rehomed?

After extensive research, Adopt-a-Pet.com launched Rehome with the support of the Petco Foundation. Dana Puglisi, director of marketing and communications for Adopt-a-Pet.com, says, “Rehome is the groundbreaking, peer-to-peer pet adoption platform that allows pet owners who can no longer keep their beloved pets to find great new adopters for them using Adopt-a-Pet.com’s adoptable pet search engine.”

The Rehome program advertises the pet to millions of prospective pet adopters. Adoption experts then guide you through the screening of applicants, so you can choose the right adopter for your pet, then help you with finalizing the adoption contract.

“We will also donate that pet’s adoption fee in full to the animal shelter or rescue who referred them into the system,” Dana says. “So, we’re not only helping to reduce the burden on local animal welfare organizations, but we’re also helping them to fundraise to save more pets.”

The program is already a success — to date, Rehome has taken in more than a quarter million pets. For more information about the Adopt-a-Pet.com’s Rehome program, go to the website rehome.adoptapet.com.

Top photograph: corners74 | Getty Images

Read Next: How to Survive a Puppy

2 thoughts on “When You Have To Rehome Your Dog”

  1. I had to rehome one rescue we had adopted. However, the rescue organization did him a tremendous disservice by posting his ad and allowing us to adopt him.
    We have a VERY busy family. When we adopted him, we had three relatively young children plus a pretty hyper dog already. It turned out that this dog had severe anxiety issues and that much activity caused him to be in an almost constant state of anxiety. His ad also said he was “good with children and other animals of all sizes.” They later told me he had never been around children or cats. He was advertised and non-destructive, and house trained. Neither was true. We tried EVERYTHING to calm him. I slept in the living room with him on the couch; we wanted to pull him into the bed with us. We tried so many things to help him calm down and settle to no avail. Every day he would be anxious, and every night they would continue, and he could not pay. We kept him for a year and finally realized that we were just not the right family for him. It killed me to give him back, but I realized that he was suffering being with us due to the craziness that is our home. Keeping him meant putting him through a miserable life and making him suffer. In this particular case, rehoming him was the right thing to do. Keeping him would have been selfish. https://esacare.com/top-three-dog-training-myths-explained-by-14-renowned-experts/

  2. I had to rehome one rescue we had adopted.
    We have a very busy family. When we adopted him, we had three relatively young children plus a pretty hyper dog already. It turned out that this dog had severe anxiety issues and that much activity caused him to be in an almost constant state of anxiety. His ad also said he was “good with children and other animals of all sizes.” They later told me he had never been around children or cats. He was advertised and non-destructive, and house trained. Neither was true. We tried EVERYTHING to calm him. I slept in the living room with him on the couch; we wanted to pull him into the bed with us. We tried so many things to help him calm down and settle to no avail. Every day he would be anxious, and every night they would continue, and he could not pay. We kept him for a year and finally realized that we were just not the right family for him. It killed me to give him back, but I realized that he was suffering being with us due to the craziness that is our home. Keeping him meant putting him through a miserable life and making him suffer. In this particular case, rehoming him was the right thing to do. Keeping him would have been selfish. https://esacare.com/top-three-dog-training-myths-explained-by-14-renowned-experts/

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Shopping Cart