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30 Medium-Sized Dog Breeds: With Pictures & Facts

Written by: Dogster Team

Last Updated on May 23, 2024 by Dogster Team

airedale terrier standing in the forest

30 Medium-Sized Dog Breeds: With Pictures & Facts

People vary in their taste in dogs. On one end, you have owners who prefer the toy and trendy “teacup” breeds like Chihuahuas and Toy Yorkshire Terriers. On the opposite end of the spectrum, owners go for giant breeds like the Giant Schnauzer, Great Dane, and Irish Wolfhound.

Not everyone wants extremes, however. The medium-sized breeds that exist somewhere in the middle coming in between 25 and 60 pounds, can be just as popular. Here are 30 medium-sized dog breeds to consider adopting into your family.

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How Are Medium-Sized Dogs Classified?

“Medium” has a wide definition in terms of size, ranging from the 25-pound small-medium dogs (playfully called smedium doggos) like the Corgi to medium breeds on the verge of being large, like the Dalmatian. Naturally, they fall into a range of AKC groups, including the Hound, Working Group, Sporting, Terrier, and Non-Sporting, all with different histories and characteristics.

The 30 Medium-Sized Dog Breeds

1. Airedale Terrier

Dog handler is walking with his obedient airedale terrier dog on the road in a forest
Image Credit: thka, Shutterstock
Origin: Yorkshire, England
Lifespan: 10–12 years
Height: 22–24 in

Nicknamed the “King of the Terriers,” the Airedale Terrier is one of the most versatile dog breeds. The largest of the terriers, Airedales have been used as canine athletes, hunters, and companion dogs throughout their history. Airedales can be docile and patient family pets, but they can have the stubborn streak that’s common among other terriers.


2. Alaskan Klee Kai

black and white alaskan klee kai dog running on the grass outdoors
Image Credit: Kelsie Taylor, Shutterstock
Origin: United States
Lifespan: 12–16 years
Height: 15–17 in

The Alaskan Klee Kai is a spitz-type dog that was developed in the late 20th century as a companion-sized version of the larger Alaskan Malamute and Siberian Husky breeds. These dogs share a lot of similarities with their larger counterparts, including a striking coat pattern, thick, fluffy coat, and physical traits of northern breeds like a sickle-shaped tail and erect ears. Their personality traits also mimic those of other northern breeds, including a reserved attitude toward strangers and an energetic and playful nature with family.


3. American Foxhound

American Foxhound dog standing outdoor
Image Credit: aruni udeshika, Shutterstock
Origin: United States
Lifespan: 10–12 years
Height: 21–25 in

The American Foxhound is a scent hound that closely resembles their English cousin, the English Foxhound. As the name suggests, Foxhounds were bred to hunt foxes by scent. The AKC credits George Washington as the “Father of the American Foxhound” for his contributions to the breed’s early development. Among hunting breeds, Foxhounds are good-natured, low maintenance, and easygoing, but they do need owners who can keep up with their energy needs.


4. American Staffordshire Terrier

american staffordshire terrier dog
Image Credit: Radomir Rezny, Shutterstock
Origin: United States
Lifespan: 12–16 years
Height: 17–19 in

The American Staffordshire Terrier is a descendant of the fighting and baiting dogs that were common in Great Britain in the 18th and 19th centuries. The modern Staffy is a smart, confident, and easygoing companion with a muscular body and agile movements. These dogs are easy to train, but they need an owner with some experience to direct their natural athleticism and energy into productive activities.


5. Australian Cattle Dog

Australian Cattle Dog
Image Credit: Madelein Wolfaardt, Shutterstock
Origin: Australia
Lifespan: 13–15 years
Height: 17–20 in

The Australian Cattle Dog, otherwise known as a Blue or Red Heeler or Queensland Heeler, is a robust Australian herding dog that developed from British droving breeds and the wild Dingo. These dogs desire work and have the intelligence to outsmart their owners. If they’re allowed to get bored, Heelers can develop destructive behaviors.


6. Australian Kelpie

Australian Kelpie dog standing at the beach
Image Credit: K.A.Willis, Shutterstock
Origin: Australia
Lifespan: 12–15 years
Height: 17–20 in

The Australian Kelpie is a sheepdog that was bred in Australia to work farms. Like other herding dogs, they are intelligent, loyal, and energetic, with a strong desire to control livestock. As non-working dogs, Kelpies need tons of exercise and playtime to burn off energy and avoid boredom.


7. Australian Shepherd

australian shepherd dog sitting on a rock in the park
Image Credit: ChocoPie, Shutterstock
Origin: United States
Lifespan: 13–15 years
Height: 18–23 in

Despite the name, the Australian Shepherd is a herding breed that was developed in the United States. In addition to working cattle, Australian Shepherds have been a mainstay in the rodeo circuit and have a strong association with cowboys and the American West. With their work ethic and intelligence, Aussies are a good fit for experienced dog owners who are looking for a work or sport partner more than a companion.


8. Basset Hound

basset hound puppy
Image Credit: Jon Buscall, Shutterstock
Origin: France, Great Britain
Lifespan: 10–12 years
Height: 11–15 in

The Basset Hound is a short scenthound that was bred to hunt hares. In scenting abilities, they fall only behind the Bloodhound. These dogs aren’t as active as some of the hunting breeds, but they do require regular exercise to stay happy. They’re also known for a stubborn streak that can make training challenging.


9. Bluetick Coonhound

Bluetick Coonhound dog standing in the woods
Image Credit: Taylor Walter, Shutterstock
Origin: United States
Lifespan: 11–12 years
Height: 21–27 in

The Bluetick Coonhound is a coonhound that originated in the United States as a raccoon hunting dog. Charming and affectionate, the Bluetick Coonhound is often kept as a family dog. One of the challenges with a Bluetick Coonhound is the array of vocalizations they developed as hunters, including bell-like calls and ringing barks. This breed can be considered on the larger side of medium dogs, so keep that in mind if you do want one.


10. Bull Terrier

bull terrier dog in the park
Image Credit; dudonyrud, Shutterstock
Origin: England
Lifespan: 10–14 years
Height: 12–16 in

More mischievous and playful than tough and intimidating, the Bull Terrier was bred as a ratter and for bloodsports. Now, these dogs are primarily companion dogs and alert dogs, though they need strong training to overcome their independent and stubborn streak.


11. Bulldog

french bulldog walking outdoor
Image Credit: dezy, Shutterstock
Origin: England
Lifespan: 8–10 years
Height: 12–16 in

Known for a low-slung carriage and a “sour mug” face, the Bulldog is routinely used as a mascot symbolizing courage and tenacity. These dogs are loyal and docile, often preferring to lounge around the house. While easygoing, Bulldogs were bred to be fighters, so they need consistent training to avoid problem behaviors. With that said, they can be incredible companions.


12. Cardigan Welsh Corgi

cardigan welsh corgi dog standing in the grass
Image Credit: Lyntree, Shutterstock
Origin: Cardiganshire, Wales
Lifespan: 12–15 years
Height: 10–13 in

The Cardigan Welsh Corgi is one of the two Corgi breeds. They originated in Cardiganshire as working dogs for cattle ranchers. They have low stature because of their dwarfism, but they’re remarkably powerful and agile while working.


13. Carolina Dog

Ginger and Brown Colored Carolina Dog Walking in the Snow
Image Credit: Epic Sights Photography, Shutterstock
Origin: United States
Lifespan: 8–10 years
Height: 17–19 in

Carolina Dogs are descendants of the canines that accompanied Paleo-Indians on their travels across the Bering land bridge. They still roam the southeastern coast of the US and resemble a jackal or wolf with a curved tail and fox-like snout. Because of their primitive nature, Carolina Dogs are shy and suspicious until they get to know someone.


14. Chow Chow

chow chow dog walking outdoor
Image Credit: Oral Zirek, Shutterstock
Origin: China
Lifespan: 9–15 years
Height: 19–22 in

The Chow Chow is an all-purpose Chinese breed that resembles a small lion. Their thick, fluffy coats cover a strong and compact frame that made them excellent guardian dogs. Known to be as meticulous as cats, Chows are powerful, low-maintenance dogs that enjoy a life of leisure.


15. Dalmatian

mini Dalmatian dog in the woods
Image Credit: Kerrie T, Shutterstock
Origin: Dalmatia
Lifespan: 10–13 years
Height: 22–24 in

Known for their distinctive spotted coats immortalized by Disney, Dalmatians have a unique history as coach dogs for nobility, Roma, and firefighters. They’re elegant, non-sporting dogs, but that doesn’t mean they aren’t strong, agile, and fast. As protectors of coach horses, Dalmatians are alert and dependable watch dogs.


16. English Setter

black and white English setter in a field and sunshine
Image Credit: zoyas2222, Shitterstock
Origin: England
Lifespan: 12 years
Height: 23–27 in

The English Setter is a medium-sized sporting dog that’s prized for their good looks and hunting prowess equally. Developed to work in varied English terrain, English Setters are graceful and gentlemanly hunters who get along well with people and other dogs.


17. German Wirehaired Pointer

German Wirehaired Pointer
Image Credit: Natallia Yaumenenka, Shutterstock
Origin: Germany
Lifespan: 12–14 years
Height: 22–26 in

The German Wirehaired Pointer is a versatile mid-sized gundog that lives for the outdoors. With a wiry coat that resists any kind of inclement weather and harsh terrain, the Pointer is a perfectly purpose-built hunter. Though determined and resilient workers, German Wirehaired Pointers like to spend time lounging about and playing with their human companions off duty.


18. Hokkaido

Hokkaido Dog
Image Credit: Happy Monkey, Shutterstock
Origin: Hokkaido, Japan
Lifespan: 12–15 years
Height: 18–20 in

The Hokkaido is an extremely rare, ancient Japanese breed that originated in the region of the same name. Evolving alongside the Ainu people, Hokkaido were prized for their loyalty, bravery, and problem-solving abilities. Like their owners, Hokkaido hunted bears and deer in the extremely cold northern climate.


19. Icelandic Sheepdog

icelandic sheepdog
Image Credit: Bildagentur Zoonar GmbH, Shutterstock
Origin: Iceland
Lifespan: 12–15 years
Height: 17–18 in

The Icelandic Sheepdog is the only native Icelandic breed and a perfect example of a medium-sized Nordic spitz. These herding dogs show spitz traits like a fox face, pointed ears, a curled tail, and a dense coat that helps them withstand the punishing cold of the north. After generations of travels with their owners, Icelandic Sheepdogs are among the most loyal dog breeds.


20. Keeshond

Male Keeshond on a flower FieldMale Keeshond on a flower Field
Image Credit: Doczahi, Shutterstock
Origin: Holland
Lifespan: 13–15 years
Height: 17–18 in

The Keeshond is another spitz-type that originated in Holland as a companion for canal barges. The breed is still a symbol of Dutch patriotism, sharing the same characteristics as other ancient spitz stock like Samoyeds and Pomeranians—a foxy face, pointed ears, and a plumed tail. Another unique trait is the “spectacled” look that the dogs have from their eye markings.


21. Norwegian Elkhound

Norwegian Elkhounds
Image Credit: Chris Bambrick, Shutterstock
Origin: Norway
Lifespan: 12–15 years
Height: 19–20 in

The Norwegian Elkhound is a fluffy, dignified spitz breed and one of Europe’s oldest hunting breeds. They were a fixture on Viking voyages and showed up throughout Norse art, history, and folklore. Like other northern breeds, Elkhounds are reserved until they develop a bond with people.


22. Nova Scotia Duck Tolling Retriever

nova scotia duck tolling retriever at the shore
Image Credit: Karsten Madsen, Pixabay
Origin: Nova Scotia
Lifespan: 10–14 years
Height: 12–16 in

The smallest of the retrievers, the Nova Scotia Duck Tolling Retriever is a tireless gundog that’s perfectly adapted to hunting near water. They’re short and athletic, capable of hunting, running, and swimming to pursue their catch. They even have webbed feet!


23. Pembroke Welsh Corgi

Welsh Pembroke Corgi dog standing on the field
Image Credit: Furry Tales Photography, Shutterstock
Origin: Pembrokeshire, Wales
Lifespan: 12–15 years
Height: 10–13 in

The Pembroke Welsh Corgi is the other Corgi breed. Developed in Pembrokeshire as a herding dog, these dogs are also dwarf dogs that are “a big dog in a small package.” They have short, muscular legs and remarkable agility, as well as bravery and independence when performing their work.


24. Pharaoh Hound

Pharaon dog standing outside in beautiful autumn park
Image Credit: Eve Photography, Shutterstock
Origin: Malta
Lifespan: 11–14 years
Height: 12–16 in

The Pharaoh Hound, also known as the “Blushing Dog” of Malta, is an elegant and fast hound bred to course game. They have a resemblance to sighthounds with a sleek, aerodynamic body that can keep up with rabbits. Developing on the rocky terrain of the islands, the Pharaoh Hound is an incredible agility competitor.


25. Spanish Water Dog

Spanish Water Dog outside
Image Credit: Daz Stock, Shutterstock
Origin: Spain
Lifespan: 10–14 years
Height: 15–20 in

The Spanish Water Dog was produced in Spain as a general-purpose sheepdog and guard dog. However, they get their name for their inexhaustible ability to retrieve waterfowl. Their thick wooly curls protect them against extreme cold and wetness, which helps for gunwork and herding.


26. Standard Poodle

Red (brown) standard poodle with the cut of golden doodle looking into the camera with sweet expression
Image Credit: Ruta Zukauskaite, Shutterstock
Origin: France, Germany
Lifespan: 12–15 years
Height: 18–24 in

Poodles come in Standard, Miniature, or Toy varieties with similar looks and proportions, but the Standard is the only medium-sized Poodle. A fixture in the circus and show rings, Poodles were bred as hunters and demonstrated incredible strength and agility. They’re also one of the smartest dog breeds and the easiest to train, but they may outsmart you if you’re not careful.


27. Swedish Lapphund

Portrait of Finnish Lapphund dog in nature in autumn or fall
Image Credit: Lindaze, Shutterstock
Origin: Sweden
Lifespan: 12–14 years
Height: 16–20 in

The Swedish Lapphund is a fluffy work dog that was used to herd in the reindeer trade. These versatile dogs now work in tracking, herding, agility, obedience, and more, and they’re perfectly content as happy-go-lucky family companions. Though they can relax, Lapphunds need regular exercise and mental stimulation to prevent problem behaviors.


28. Taiwan Dog

Origin: Taiwan
Lifespan: 10–13 years
Height: 19–20 in

Also known as the Formosan Mountain Dog, the Taiwan Dog is on the smaller end of the medium-sized dog range. They evolved to work in the uneven and thickly forested terrain of Taiwan, and their smaller size makes them more agile in pursuing small game. As a semi-feral breed that evolved alongside humans, Taiwan Dogs have a natural hunting ability and strong connections with their owners.


29. Whippet

English Whippet standing on a river bank background
Image Credit: Natallia Yaumenenka, Shutterstock
Origin: Great Britain
Lifespan: 12–15 years
Height: 18–22 in

A relative of the Greyhound, the Whippet is a sleek, medium-sized sighthound that’s been dubbed the “Poor Man’s Racehorse.” Whippets are streamlined, lightning-fast dogs that enjoy running and chasing, but they’re happy to lounge around for long periods as companion dogs.


30. Wirehaired Pointing Griffon

Wirehaired Pointing Griffon
Image Credit: Brook Robinson, Shutterstock
Origin: Netherlands, France
Lifespan: 10–12 years
Height: 20–24 in

The Wirehaired Pointing Griffon is a quick-witted, all-purpose gundog. These hardworking sport dogs have a unique and attractive look with a harsh, bristly coat that makes them look scruffy all the time. With a long hunting history, Griffons are honest, loyal, and stoic in the field and as companions.

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Conclusion

Whether you want an athlete, a companion, or a hunting partner in a smaller package, medium-sized dogs run the gamut. They’re a perfect “happy medium,” neither delicate nor unmanageable in size, for the right owner.

Sources


Featured Image Credit: otsphoto, Shutterstock

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