Doxiepoo: Get to Know a Hybrid Breed

The Doxiepoo, bred from a Poodle and a Dachshund, is a quiet, obedient dog, until a distraction comes his way -- then it's off to the races.

Kelly Pulley  |  Aug 16th 2012


The Doxie has moxie and the Poodle has oodles of class, so what do you get when you cross the two breeds? A quiet, obedient dog that is also prone to episodes of energetic outbursts (in other words, trying to teach the cat a lesson). Yes, the Doxiepoo, a cross between the Dachshund and the Toy Poodle, or the Miniature Dachshund and the Toy Poodle, or the Miniature Dachshund and the Teacup Poodle (this is one mixed-up dog), is all of this and more. This mutt will sit nobly and patiently by your side until some challenge comes his way, then he’s off for battle, so you’d better have a good hold on the leash.

DOGSTER WARNING: If you are in the market for a Doxiepoo, please be forewarned that this is not an established breed, and the chances that you will encounter backyard breeders or puppy millers trying to capitalize on this fancy mutt’s popularity are pretty high. As with any breed, please DO YOUR HOMEWORK and resist the urge to impulse buy. If you see “buy it now” PayPal buttons on websites hawking these dogs, this is a huge red flag and we implore you to run screaming in the opposite direction.

We are also huge fans of adoption here at Dogster, and urge you to look at local shelters and rescues for lovable pups that might just — gasp — be the offspring of a Dachshund and a Toy Poodle. It’s really not too far-fetched. But anyway, onto the profile …

What Doxiepoos Are Like to Live With

The Doxiepoo is, above all, an adaptable and affectionate hybrid dog. He bonds strongly with his owner but most are wary of strangers. Not so much so with other dogs, however, so Doxiepoos should be introduced slowly to unknown canines. They also have a tendency to chase smaller animals, especially cats. They are good with children as long as the children treat the Doxie with respect.

Doxiepoos have a delightful sense of humor, though they don’t know it. Their antics are uplifting to watch, especially since they remain serious. They make good watchdogs and, indeed, can be a bit too territorial, so visitors should be introduced slowly to this determined little dog.

Things You Should Know About the Doxiepoo

Doxiepoos make good apartment dogs because of their size and the fact that they only need a moderate amount of exercise. However (and this is a big “however”), Doxiepoos bark. Some are so vocal they’ll bark all day while you’re at work. This can be confusing when you return home and are met with the angry faces of stay-at-home neighbors. Doxiepoos can be trained to curb their barking, however.

Doxiepoos, in general, are easy to train as long as you can keep their attention (you’re counting on the Poodle side here, because the Dachshund side is always distracted). Socialization and obedience training are a must for this hybrid dog. Keep in mind that because of the many variations of crosses between different types of Poodles and Dachshunds, this can be an unpredictable breed in both looks and temperament.

Doxiepoo History: Fast Facts

  • The Dachshund, one of the Doxiepoo’s parents, is an old breed bred in Germany to hunt for badger.
  • The Toy Poodle, the most common other parent of the Doxiepoo, was bred in France to be a lap dog and a performing dog. He entertained crowds at circuses in the 19th century.
  • The Doxiepoo started out as a cross of a purebred Dachshund and a purebred Toy Poodle.
  • Today, Doxiepoos are bred with other Doxiepoos as well.

The Look of the Doxiepoo

The Doxiepoo weighs 6 to 25 pounds, usually on the lighter side. He lives 12 to 15 years. He is a bit of a conundrum — a dog with the long body and short legs of the Dachshund but often with the short snout and rounded head of the Poodle. Doxiepoos can look very different from one another, though, with some looking like a Dachshund with curly hair or others greatly resembling a Poodle with the short, straight fur of some Dachshunds. They tend to be black, red, or tan, and sometimes black and white.

10 Things You Might Not Know About the Doxiepoo and His Parent Breeds

  1. Louis XVI owned a Poodle.
  2. A Toy Poodle named Domini performing in circuses in the 19th century was said to have been able to play dominos and tell time.
  3. The average cost of a Doxiepoo puppy, generally speaking, is $250.
  4. But Doxiepoo puppies can cost more than $2,000.
  5. Doxiepoos are popular in the Southern states.
  6. Doxiepoo lovers can get much useless Doxiepoo memorabilia on Zazzle — one useful thing is the T-shirt that reads, “I Love My Doxiepoo – it’s a dog.”
  7. The Doxiepoo has been immortalized in a kitschy pin on eBay.
  8. The Doxiepoo’s nicknames include: Doxiedoodle, Doxypoodle, Dachdoodle, and just Doodle.
  9. The Doxiepoo belongs to the International Designer Canine Registry.
  10. It can be tough to identify a Doxiepoo because they differ so much — be prepared to be surprised when your Doxiepoo puppy grows up and looks like a Chihuahua with Terrier fur.

And before you go, here, have some Doxiepoo puppies:

Again, we hope you read our disclaimer above!