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Euthanized Pup Rises From the “Dead”

A couple of weeks ago a scrawny 10-week-old puppy was euthanized (one injection to the arm, one to the heart) along with his five siblings,...

Maria Goodavage  |  Mar 3rd 2011


A couple of weeks ago a scrawny 10-week-old puppy was euthanized (one injection to the arm, one to the heart) along with his five siblings, declared dead by a vet, and discarded in a rusty old dumpster outside a Sulphur, Okla. dog shelter.

Then the winds of fate changed course, and everything turned upside-down. For some strange reason, the garbage truck didn’t come by that night. The next day, Animal Control Officer Scott Prall heard a whimpering coming from the direction of the dumpster. He found a little black and white puppy, “just as healthy as could be,” in the dumpster.

Veterinarian Amanda Kloski took him in and has been caring for the resurrected dog since. She was hoping to find one loving home for him when he got over his hookworms. Homes are hard to come by in these parts, it seems. But once again, something fluky happened. A Pennsylvania woman heard about the pup, who had acquired the name Wall-e after the Pixar film about a survivor robot. The woman started a Facebook page for Wall-e, and now hundreds of people from all around North America are lining up to adopt him.

“In Sulphur we have NEVER had the problem (or BLESSING) of more than one family wishing to adopt a dog so we are new to this concept,” Dr. Kloski wrote on Wall-e’s Petfinder page. “Most of our dogs do not get this chance or opportunity even ONCE. It is amazing!”

While this miracle pup will surely have a very happy future, the same can’t be said for all the other animals in this area, which is badly in need of a shelter. If the county had an adequate shelter, Wall-e and his brothers and sisters might not have been euthanized the very day someone abandoned them there in an old cage, say shelter volunteers.

Davis Animal Shalter volunteers are holding a spaghetti dinner on March 18 to continue raising funds, should you happen to be around town and hankering to trade some dough for some pasta. If you can’t make it that day but want to help out, you can contact Audrey, with Davis Oklahoma Animal Volunteers, at 580/369-7862. And if you’re in the area, Kloski says the most wonderful donation of all would be for people in the area to volunteer as foster homes so dogs and cats can be moved out of shelters to avoid euthanasia, or to take in a forever dog. You can reach her or a shelter volunteer at 817/266-1901.

Check out this Petfinder page to see some of the dogs at the Sulfur Animal Shelter who need homes before it’s too late.

Why is Wall-e still alive? He should be long gone, like all the others in the dumpster. But this is a dog whose motto must be “never say die.” Maybe from his miracle can grow a shelter that help save lives. (And in the meantime, whatever vet put him to sleep should check his or her protocol and supplies so this never happens again. It worked out for Wall-e, but if he’d woken up in the bottom of a garbage truck, his fate would not have been so good.)

Just a few months ago I wrote a story about a dog whose owner had her euthanized because of her failing health. Fortunately he brought her home to bury her. When he walked into the garage, she was standing by her food bowl waiting for a meal. It makes you wonder how often this kind of Lazarus thing happens, and what can be done to prevent it?

(A big thank you to Dogster amigo Santiagofdz for letting me know about this story as soon as he heard about it!)