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Jill the French Bulldog Tests a Chastity Belt for Dogs

No matter what the reason for having an unspayed female dog, the Pet Anti-Breeding System helps you avoid unwanted litters.

Karen Dibert  |  May 4th 2016


As breeders, we obviously don’t have our dogs spayed or neutered. It’s counterproductive to raising puppies. We’re on the tail end of our breeding years, though, in what we call the “we’re not sure if we’re still raising puppies or not” stage. We are down to one boy and one girl, and if we end up having a happy accidental litter of puppies, that would be great. If we never have puppies again, that’s okay, too.

In our state of limbo here, we are kind of letting the chips fall where they may. However, we know better than most people about how puppies happen and what kind of work goes into raising a litter. While I’ve taken a lackadaisical approach to this whole thing, I’m also incredibly vigilant when necessary. I have to be, as anyone does when they have dogs who aren’t altered.

Whether or not to spay and neuter has become a trending topic, even encompassing the question of the correct timing of the procedures.  Even vets are disagreeing on a perfect age for this surgery, leaving pet owners scratching their heads. While there may be medical evidence both in favor of early spaying and neutering, and waiting until later, a good vet will always have your dog’s health as their first concern, and should be able to help you decide what is right for you and your dog.

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Jill modeling her PAB system. (Photo by Karen Dibert)

Should you be in the camp who chooses to wait until your dog is older before spaying, or if you choose to leave her intact, whether for breeding or show purposes, or health reasons, there is always the risk of unwanted puppies. Medical alternatives to keeping a female from ovulating can be risky to a dog’s health, so that leaves owners with choices that include crate confinement for the weeks when their female is in a heat cycle, and this isn’t fun for either dogs or their owners.

This is why the Pet Anti-Breeding System was designed. The Pet Anti-Breeding System, or PABS, is a new, all natural, non-invasive solution to serve as “birth control” for your intact female. In essence, this is a chastity belt for dogs, providing pet parents with a safe and secure method to avoid accidental litters. When your female dog comes into heat, the protective barrier not only prevents breeding, but will also hold a sanitary pad to protect your floors and furniture from messes during your dog’s heat cycle.

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Dog wearing the Pet Anti-Breeding System. Notice the tail placement, which you can’t see with Jill wearing it. (Photo courtesy PABSforPets.com)

I was given a PABS system to try, and the timing was perfect. Our girl, Jill, is due to come into heat this month, and it would not be a good time for us to have puppies. We will be away for a few weeks when puppies would be due, and there are far too many risks for puppies to be born when I’m not here to take care of my mama and babies. I mostly work from home, and can watch Jill and Louie to be sure no hanky panky occurs, but if you know anything about dogs and breeding, you also know that puppies can be made in the time it takes to stir a pot to keep it from boiling over on the stove. The PABS system is designed for such situations as I now find myself in. Vigilance isn’t good enough. PABS is better at preventing unwanted litters and protecting intact females.

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After all the straps are adjusted, the system fits perfectly. (Photo by Karen Dibert)

Be aware that the initial fitting of the harness is going to take some time. It is an eight-point buckle system that will need every strap adjusted just so to be sure it adequately fits, allowing the system to do its job. The soft, durable webbing includes a mesh backing to keep her rear end covered at all times, and allows her to relieve herself over the top and through the mesh. This is also a reason why the harness needs adjusted properly. It took me about 10 minutes to get Jill harnessed in properly, but now that I know it fits and covers all that it should, I simply need to buckle it on next time she wears it, much like a dog coat or harness.

Jill is not a fan of this system, but she also is not a huge fan of coats. It’s a personal preference for dogs, and something they would get accustomed to quickly. For the peace of mind and level of protection it offers, it is well worth the slight discomfort to your dog until she adjusts. (And by discomfort, I mean “oh my gosh, there’s something on me,” because it does not harm the dog in any way whatsoever.)

Now I can feel confident to take a shower or go for groceries without having to lock the dogs up to prevent unwanted litters while I’m not looking. The PABS system helps me plan, confidently, when puppies will NOT happen, and that is good for both myself and my dog.

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The system, fresh out of the box. (Photo by Karen Dibert)

PABS sizing runs from S to XXL, covering dogs between 8 and 120 pounds. The systems are adjustable to fit your dog’s unique waist size and dimensions because a good fit is key to keeping your dog safe from unwanted breeding.

Dogster scorecard for the Pet Anti-Breeding Systems (PABS)

Quality: Very good! The full adjustability of this system will ensure a perfect fit on any dog or body style, and a good fit is going to be what makes the system work.
Practicality: While it’s rather a chore to get it adjusted the first time, and it looks far less than attractive, it really is an excellent preventive. I like that the dog can still go potty with the system on, and the fact that it has pads to catch messes.
Value: While at$49.99 to $67.99 it’s not as cheap as I’d like, considering the alternative is raising a litter of puppies, it’s a very cheap option in the long run. And it’s far healthier for a dog than medication.

Bottom line

Being so effective, I can’t complain too much about the look of the system, but the reality is that it’s not exactly dog park wear. It’s best suited for homes with unaltered males and females together in the house, or a hunting dog who is in heat and you need to take into the field.