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why is my dog acting depressed or slugish?

we are owners of five dogs two rotties two chi's and one wired hair terrior. All the dogs recently had their vet appointments; one of the chi's was a bit over weight, vet said to stop free feeding, we did. But this change seemed to get "Birdie" (one chi) to act a bit different, we went back to the old feeding to see if her behavior changed, it didnt. normally Birdie is very energitic and full of life , but lately she is quite the opposite. The visit to the vet was about 3or4 weeks ago& all was well, the only thing that has really changed is the type of food we bought for them could this be a major factor any help/ advise would be great. Birdie's behavior has been this way for about two weeks thought maybe it was the weather change she has an appointment tomorrow but any thoughts or suggestions would greatly appreciated!


Asked by Member 980266 on Apr 7th 2010 in Other Health & Wellness
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Petri

I would think it is the food and/or weather. Probably not too big of a deal, but the vet may have you switch food again or start mixing it with something else. If it just got cooler in your area or has been cold, this can make dogs bluesy. Try to notice if he perks up when it is a nice day out. good luck!


Petri answered on 4/8/10. Helpful? Yes/Helpful: No 0 Report this answer


Guest

First of all the correct name is a wire haired Fox Terrier, although many of them do seem to be wired.
What were you feeding and what are you feeding now? Depending on the protein and fat content of the old vs the new, that may be the issue. If you have switched to a food with much less protein and/or fat, your dogs just won't have the same energy levels as they did with a higher calorie count per cup of food.
The other thought is again, an unknown to us. How old is Birdie? Depending on her age, she may have just reached that point in a dog's maturity when they naturally slow dog. This usually is when a pup turns into an adult and stops growing.


Member 641257 answered on 4/8/10. Helpful? Yes/Helpful: No 0 Report this answer