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How do I get the dog to leave me alone?

My roommate got a boxer several months ago. He will not leave me alone when I'm sitting on the couch. When I ignore him he drools on me, saying 'no' or 'sit' doesn't work, and when I push him away he thinks I'm play fighting with him. How do I get him to give me my space?


Asked by Member 1010389 on Nov 2nd 2010 Tagged boxer, leave, behaviour in Socialization
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Answers

Beau

Tell your roommate you need space, and to put the dog on a leash.


Beau answered on 11/3/10. Helpful? Yes/Helpful: No 0 Report this answer


Nibbles

I would try to get the dog interested in a toy or chew bone like a rawhide. Pay the poor animal some attention and he might not be so desperate for attention. Does the animal have to go out or needs water or food? If his basic needs are not being met he will naturally seek someone out. Also suggest to your roommate that the dog may need more excercise. When you don't want to play say "enough" then ignore him. He will get the message.


Nibbles answered on 11/3/10. Helpful? Yes/Helpful: No 0 Report this answer


Bruno CGC

This is difficult because it's not your dog. I assume the roomie hasn't trained the dog at all yet either, and it shouldn't be your responsibility to train a dog that isn't yours.
So, if roomie doesn't want to crate or leash the dog when you're around, and you want to work on changing the dog's behavior and not the roomies, here's what I'd do.
I'd train the dog to lie down on cue. It's pretty easy- you use a food lure held near the ground which forces the dog to lie down to eat it. Don't let him eat it until he lies down! Eventually he will lie down when he sees you moving the tidbit towards the ground.
Then you switch to an empty hand. At first he may be confused, but if he lies down anyway, give him a treat from your other hand to reward him. The end point of this is a dog who lies down when you point at the floor.
There are loads of training books and articles than can explain this better than I can as well.


Bruno CGC answered on 11/3/10. Helpful? Yes/Helpful: No 2 Report this answer