Cavachon: Get to Know a Hybrid Dog Breed

These sweet, loving dogs are very people-oriented, so include them in family life as much as possible.

Kelly Pulley  |  Sep 13th 2012


If you ever meet a Cavachon, don’t be surprised if you have a strange sensation of being in the presence of royalty. This small hybrid dog looks as if he should be sitting on the lap of Maid Marian like a gentleman while Robin Hood jousts with the sheriff of Nottingham.

The Cavachon is a dog harkening from a royal past and years of expertise as a lap dog. He is a cross between the King Charles Cavalier Spaniel and the Bichon Frise, two breeds created by nobility and used to wealthy lifestyles in their past. But is the Cavachon stuck up at all? Does he expect champagne and caviar for every meal? No! This sweet hybrid is really very down to earth and more than happy to mingle with the common folk.

DOGSTER WARNING: If you are in the market for a Cavachon, please be forewarned that this is not an established breed, and the chances that you will encounter backyard breeders or puppy millers trying to capitalize on this fancy mutt’s popularity are pretty high. As with any breed, please DO YOUR HOMEWORK and resist the urge to impulse buy. If you see “buy it now” PayPal buttons on websites hawking these dogs, this is a huge red flag and we implore you to run screaming in the opposite direction.

We are also huge fans of adoption here at Dogster, and urge you to look at local shelters and rescues for lovable pups that might just — gasp — be the offspring of a King Charles Cavalier Spaniel and a Bichon Frise. It’s really not too far-fetched. But anyway, on to the profile ….

What Cavachons Are Like to Live With

Cavachons are nice. They are sweet and loving and would be “kind,” if dogs could take on that trait. They are great family dogs — good with children and other animals. Since they are a hybrid and thus have not been standardized as a purebred would be, their characteristics can vary, but these traits seem to be very common.

Cavachons are very adaptable hybrid dogs who live well in an apartment or a house. They tend to bark at strangers but are otherwise fairly quiet dogs.

Things You Should Know About the Cavachon

The Cavachon sheds, unlike many of the Poodle hybrids, and needs regular grooming including clipping and treating tear stains. Sometimes this just involves using a tear-stain wipe, but some Cavachons have excessive tearing, which could affect their vision, and they may need to have their tear ducts flushed at the vet periodically.

Cavachons are very people-oriented, so leaving them alone for long periods can result in destruction from anxiety. Crate-training your Cavachon is helpful, but be prepared to include them in family life as much as possible. Giving your pup enough exercise will also help.

Cavachon History: Fast Facts

  • The King Charles Cavalier, a parent of the Cavachon, originated in the reign of King Charles II of Britain from the Spaniels he always kept with him.
  • The Bichon Frise, the other parent, was developed by French Royalty — it was known as the Curly Lapdog.
  • The Cavachon originated in the U.S. in 1996.

The Look of the Cavachon

The Cavachon is cute but not too cute. He has the overall look of a bigger dog, so the adorableness of his big eyes, little nose, and perky, furry ears is tempered a bit. Some look more like a Bichon while others look more like a King Charles Cavalier, but this hybrid dog definitely has a look of his own. The Cavachon can be white, tan, white and tan, white and black, white and sable, white and red, or tricolor. The coat is usually silky and either loosely curled or wavy, with the appearance of a sort of neat shagginess. They weigh between 10 to 20 pounds.

10 Cool Things You Might Not Know About the Cavachon

  1. The Cavachon is also known as the Cavashon.
  2. The average life expectancy for a Cavachon is around 12 years.
  3. In the 2008 movie Get Smart, Anne Hathaway’s character has a Cavachon.
  4. Cavachon puppies tend to cost $800 to $1,500.
  5. Many Cavachons sold in pet stores or through sites such as Craigslist come from puppy mills; adopt or find a reputable breeder instead.
  6. There are Cavachons available for adoption; try www.petfinder.com.
  7. The Cavachon has surged in popularity over the last few years.
  8. There are Cavachon breeders across the U.S., but mostly in New Jersey and Pennsylvania.
  9. Some popular names for Cavachons are Cosmo, Chloe, Belle, Kibbles, and Champ.
  10. Like other hybrid breeds, a Cavachon that is from a purebred parent on each side is considered an F1, or First Generation, pup.

Let’s wrap this up with some Cavachon puppies: