GO!

So, what if a dog bite you?

This is a place to gain some understanding of dog behavior and to assist people in training their dogs and dealing with common behavior problems, regardless of the method(s) used. This can cover the spectrum from non-aversive to traditional methods of dog training. There are many ways to train a dog. Please avoid aggressive responses, and counter ideas and opinions with which you don't agree with friendly and helpful advice. Please refrain from submitting posts that promote off-topic discussions. Keep in mind that you may be receiving advice from other dog owners and lovers... not professionals. If you have a major problem, always seek the advice of a trainer or behaviorist!

  
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Baby

What'd you say?- I wasn't- listening.
 
 
Barked: Wed Sep 26, '12 6:56pm PST 
I'm not sure where this goes but I just watched that video posted about CM getting bitten by a dog and I was like "whoa, what should I do if a dog bites me like that?". So anyone know what you should do (assuming the dog bites and holds)? Of course avoidance is the best solution but should the occasion rise that it happens... I'm a pretty small person and can't "man handle" a German Shepherd Dog or anything over like... 40lbs.

Just figured I'd ask.

Edited by author Wed Sep 26, '12 6:57pm PST

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Noah

Herpaderp-apotam- us
 
 
Barked: Wed Sep 26, '12 7:11pm PST 
I've been bitten like that a couple of times and as much as I can say now "Well, I should have done this instead..." but in the moment, I lashed out and kicked the dog as hard as I could. In the moment, you tend to lose your head. At least I did, because I was on the ground with a 70 pound lab on top of me hanging on to my leg.
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Jackson Tan

Lad about town
 
 
Barked: Wed Sep 26, '12 11:08pm PST 
Grab the collar, twist hard, and wait for the dog to release to breathe. If the dog isn't wearing a collar, I would kick. The other option is just to wait the dog out, it can't hang there forever, but I can't see many people doing that in that situation.

If there is a second person present, sometimes grabbing the dog's hind legs and lifting off the ground can force release. Or doing the same collar technique with a belt or leash.

Don't ever try to rip the dog off or force the jaws. You risk losing a chunk of yourself.

ETA: this is only in the case of a large dog that could do serious injury and you need to get off NOW. I would never kick or hit a small dog in the same situation, and would be hesitant to even tighten the collar because it might collapse the trachea. A small dog I would wait out and take the pain.

Edited by author Wed Sep 26, '12 11:27pm PST

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Nare

Woo-woo- whineybutt
 
 
Barked: Thu Sep 27, '12 8:51am PST 
It depends on the situation.. One time I was walking out of my friend's sliding glass door, and her GSD was outside, as soon as I started to step out she lunged at me and bit into my knee.
It was probably a bad idea but I stepped back and slammed the sliding door on her. silenced I could hardly walk for a few weeks.
We later learned that she was resource guarding her water bowl which was right outside the door.. Had that removed quickly.

I'd be leery of kicking though, just cause they could let go of whatever they have a hold of (arm?) and then grab your leg.. Which can knock you off balance and make you fall, giving them a chance to go for your face.
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Thor CGC

God of Thunder
 
 
Barked: Thu Sep 27, '12 3:57pm PST 
I have been bit several times as I work at a facility that works with dogs with severe behavioral issues.

If the dog is correcting you, and you scream and kick at them, then the dog corrects you more by biting you again.

If the dog is fearful and is biting you because they think they have to, and you scream or kick, you seem like more of a threat and get bit more.

Most dogs if you stand stalk still and don't react will release immediately. If they are locked down and the standing still doesnt work twist the collar like somebody else mentioned. DO NOT try and pry their jaws off, it will just get your other hand bit more.
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Baby

What'd you say?- I wasn't- listening.
 
 
Barked: Thu Sep 27, '12 6:56pm PST 
Great responses all, thanks. I plan on working with a lot of dogs in my life so I figure it's good to know.
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Sabi

When the night- closes in I will- be there
 
 
Barked: Thu Sep 27, '12 7:33pm PST 
I had a rescue who had had most of his teeth broken, that would prove a good thing. While laying at my feet relaxing he looked up at me and I told him he was a good boy. Without warning he lunged at me and got hold of my arm. He dragged me out of my chair onto the floor. I ended up with one knee pinning his body and one pinning his neck to stop him shaking my arm. With no teeth he couldn't tear but managed to crush the tendons by repeatedly clamping his jaws and I still have scars from the teeth he did have left. It took me almost 5 minutes to get my arm free. It took 6 months to use my hand again properly.
My point is even with experience, that attack was sudden and vicious. I was caught off guard and had I panicked things would have been much worse. I had one arm free against a 50 or 60 lb dog, and my left arm at that. A dog bite and a dog attack are very different. In either case stay calm. A dog that isn't letting go is actually easier to handle then one that is mauling or darting and tearing. In order to hang on the dog is keeping itself relatively stationary which may allow you to get hold of something. Sometimes pushing into the bite will force a release, but everytime I've been bitten it hurts. So my best advice is don't get bitten.
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Dunlop

Dunlop-named for- the rider not- the tyer
 
 
Barked: Thu Sep 27, '12 8:06pm PST 
One of the clubs near here does clay bird shooting and uses dogs to bring the disks back. They work on a "Negative reinforcement" basis. Instead of training the dog to drop the object and receive a reward, they twist the dogs ears to get them to let go. This may also work if "the article' the dog has, happens to be You. You'd still have to be careful of getting too close to the dogs teeth though

Feedback is welcome, if you've tried this technique let me know!
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Trigger

*Blackdog*
 
 
Barked: Mon Oct 1, '12 10:01am PST 
"One of the clubs near here does clay bird shooting and uses dogs to bring the disks back. They work on a "Negative reinforcement" basis. Instead of training the dog to drop the object and receive a reward, they twist the dogs ears to get them to let go. This may also work if "the article' the dog has, happens to be You. You'd still have to be careful of getting too close to the dogs teeth though

Feedback is welcome, if you've tried this technique let me know!"


Dunlop- force fetch training usually utilizes ecollar, toe hitch or ear pinch corrections.

The premise is not to deliver the pressure to force the dog to release what it has in it's mouth accidentally when it yelps out in pain, but rather to give the dog the control to turn off the correction.

For example, if the command is to fetch the trainer applies the ear pinch pressure until the dog picks up the dummy and holds it. If the dog refuses to give it up when told to it can also be applied until he releases. If done correctly the result is a dog that is incredibly driven to do as asked because they know the faster they accomplish the task the faster they can turn off the correction.

It's also referred to as drive training.



There would be absolutely no purpose in using an ear pinch to correct the dog after it has retrieved a given object.

If you are correct in what you've observed or heard about and they are actually doing such a thing all they are bound to do is scare the dog off retrieving altogether. I suspect however, that you've heard bits and pieces about them doing drive training there and are merely mistaken as to what's occuring.

What dog would continue to return if all they received at the end of a command sequence is punishment??





I certainly would never use an ear pinch correction on a dog who is attacking me. I'd rather be taking a bite to the leg than introduce my hand or if bending down my neck and face to the business end of a violently aggressive dog.
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Lucille

I am the Sock- Bandit!!!
 
 
Barked: Mon Oct 1, '12 11:54am PST 
Sabi's right, you're lucky if the dog is holding. It's the darters and repeat biters that are truly scary and the most dangerous; that type of attack is what worries livestock to death. Number one thing to keep in mind: Stay on your feet at all costs. Picking up the dog by the hind legs can usually get them to break a hold, that's a typical way to get a release during a dog-dog attack. So if someone else is there, that's the way to go because at least it keeps your hands and face further away from the dog. Break sticks work, I've seen them used very effectively; but you've got to know what you're doing and a good tool for that is not always handy so for common bite situations they're generally not a good solution. I can see a collar twist working; but keep in mind that if that's your strategy and the dog doesn't happen to be wearing one, or slips it which is common in an attack, then you're SOL.

I'm sorry, but I don't give a fig if it's a small dog or not, if they're a biter they're getting the same treatment regardless. A small dog can ruin a hand or knee for life just as easily as a big dog can. I'm not giving a dog more seconds to do deep tissue damage due to its smaller size, I'm not that nice.
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