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Does apple cider vinegar kill probiotics?

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Mackenzie- CGC TDI DSA

Why sit when you- can lie down?
 
 
Barked: Tue Feb 1, '11 4:40pm PST 
I usually add apple cider vinegar, probiotics, fish oil, and glucosamine supps to Mackenzie and Riley's dinner. Today, I was reading about using apple cider vinegar to prevent UTI's in pets because it kills the nasty bacteria as it moves through their system. So if it kills the nasty bacteria, wouldn't it kill the good bacteria as well? If that IS the case, then wouldn't the probiotics be cancelled out by the apple cider vinegar that I add? Does anyone know any more about this, that can correct me if I'm wrong? I can take the apple cider vinegar away, if necessary, as I'd rather include the probiotics. Any information on this is appreciated!
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Adam

Vaccine free- -Disease free- goes pawinpaw
 
 
Barked: Tue Feb 1, '11 4:45pm PST 
What ACV does is turn the stomach more acidic. Then in turn the dog's naturally highly acidic pH will get more and more alkaline as it adjusts to ACV..which is why it shouldn't be given daily unless there is a bigger problem it's being used to treat. But when it changes the stomach pH, good and bad bacteria do die yes.
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Bella and- Daisy CGC

I'm a Meanie
 
 
Barked: Tue Feb 1, '11 5:01pm PST 
It does not kill the good bacteria that are already in the intestines. The intestines are not a high acid environment like the stomach.

The stomach's natural acid kills much of the good bacteria that is taken in through the mouth anyway (like in yogurt/pills).
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Mackenzie- CGC TDI DSA

Why sit when you- can lie down?
 
 
Barked: Tue Feb 1, '11 5:26pm PST 
Thank you Adam and B&D.
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Quincy- FM TFE-II- TDIAOV CGC

I have just met- you and I LOVE- you!
 
 
Barked: Tue Feb 1, '11 7:39pm PST 
Bella and Daisy applause. Probiotics/bacteria live in the intestinal track, not the highly acidic stomach. Raw ACV balances the ph of the stomach, rather than just making it more acidic. It will just balance the scales, so to speak. I give all of mine yogurt and raw acv daily and have had such great results, I wouldn't change it for the world. blue dog
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Adam

Vaccine free- -Disease free- goes pawinpaw
 
 
Barked: Tue Feb 1, '11 7:43pm PST 
Quincy can you share a source that says ACV does not make the stomach used to acid thus more alkaline? Because the folks on rawfeeding disagree and advise not every day. It makes sense that a stomach will stop producing their own acids if you keep adding it from the environment rather but I have no source except comparisons like how probiotics or vitamin C would work.
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Quincy- FM TFE-II- TDIAOV CGC

I have just met- you and I LOVE- you!
 
 
Barked: Tue Feb 1, '11 7:53pm PST 
Adam, I'll share some human-targeted articles because it's a little harder to find dog-specific things. Here's an excerpt from Earth Clinic (http://www.earthclinic.com/Remedies/acvinegar.html#phBalance)

" APPLE CIDER VINEGAR AND pH BALANCE
It's suggested that Apple Cider Vinegar has such curative abilities because it causes one's pH levels to become more alkaline. If you are going to try apple cider vinegar for allergies, or even to prevent sickness, we suggest you do an investigation of your own by buying a pH test kit at a local pharmacy, garden nursery, or even pool supply store. You can use these kits or pH strips to test your urine to see if you are more alkaline or acid during an allergy attack, virus or bacterial infection. Once you ascertain your pH levels, you can adjust adjust your dosage of Apple Cider Vinegar accordingly.

If you live in a highly polluted area like we do (Los Angeles) where allergies and sinus infections are rampant, your system may better balance itself with a small dose of apple cider vinegar each day. Ultimately we suggest you experiment with a kit to find the pH balance your body functions optimally at. Want to know more about pH? Click here.

Our Bangkok contributor Ted tells us, "Apple Cider Vinegar in itself is alkaline because of its "ash" content, which means if the apple cider vinegar was burned, what is left over becomes ash. When you check for the pH of that ash and dissolve it with water, the content is alkaline. Whenever our body digests anything, it undergoes oxidation, which is similar to burning and the end result is that you can determine whether the end product was alkaline or acid. Apple Cider Vinegar has anti-fungal, anti-bacterial, and anti-viral properties, primarily coming from the malic acid and acetic acid portion of the vinegar. Apple cider vinegar acts as a buffer in the body because the acetic acid reacts with base or acid compounds to form an acetate, therefore rendering them chemically bioavailable for the body's utilization. Additionally, Apple Cider Vinegar can reduce the toxicity of certain compounds by converting the toxin into an acetate compound, which is less toxic. This is why they are ideal for insect bites and certain skin allergies. While Apple Cider vinegar in itself is considered alkaline, a chemically pure vinegar (acetic acid) is neither acid nor basic forming as it leaves no ash as the entire portion, when burned evaporates completely."

Also, here's a full article relating specifically to use of ACV in dogs: http://www.earthclinic.com/Pets/acvfordogs.html .

"Taken internally, ACV is credited with maintaining the acid/alkaline balance of the digestive tract. To check your dog's pH balance, pick up some pH strips at the drug store, and first thing in the morning test the dog's urine. If it reads anywhere from 6.2 - 6.5, your dog's system is exactly where it should be. If it is 7.5 or higher, the diet you are feeding is too alkaline, and ACV will re-establish the correct balance."

I couldn't find any info relating to damage from long term use. They get a pretty small dosage once daily, and when I stopped for a couple of weeks, they all had yeast infections return and had flares of acid reflux.
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Adam

Vaccine free- -Disease free- goes pawinpaw
 
 
Barked: Tue Feb 1, '11 7:59pm PST 
Thanks Quincyhail

I did read those before on the health forum herelaugh out loud

I guess I have a hard time believing in toooo much supplements..but those articles make sense.
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Akasha

We are trying to- sleep here!
 
 
Barked: Tue Feb 1, '11 8:12pm PST 
Ok sorry to nose in, but do you know how much ACV should be given? I had it someplace but can't find it anymore.
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Quincy- FM TFE-II- TDIAOV CGC

I have just met- you and I LOVE- you!
 
 
Barked: Tue Feb 1, '11 8:13pm PST 
Absolutely big grin I definitely it's possible to over supplement. I do ACV (once a day, they get a pretty low dose), wild salmon oil, glucosamine, and yogurt. I think those are really the only things that most diets can't supply, they are sort of "extras". These are the ones I've found to be the most worth while and beneficial in my experience. Anyways, I really did see an improvement in my dogs on ACV, and personally haven't found any kind of interference between the probiotivs and the ACV or my other supplements.
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