Postings by Ferris

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Dog Health > The responsibilities of a stud owner...
Ferris

Butterfly Ears
 
 
Barked: Fri Jul 1, '11 11:02am PST 
I think the stud owner’s responsibilities generally include:

You have to provide room and board for the bitch and keep her safe!

You have to do several mattings. It may depend on the breed, but usually every other day. You have to make sure that during the matting, the bitch is safe so that may mean holding her and making sure she doesn’t try to break a tie.

Often, you may have to pick her up and drop her off from the airport.

Lastly, you have to assure that the pups are being sold on a proper contract.
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» There has since been 13 posts. Last posting by Henry, Jul 2 10:02 am

Small Dogs > question for papillon owners
Ferris

Butterfly Ears
 
 
Barked: Tue May 10, '11 12:29pm PST 
A whitening shampoo is really only for occasional use. It dries the coat making it more breakable and easier to tangle. Go with a more moisturizing shampoo and conditioner. People love Vellus products for Paps or Chris Christensen.
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» There has since been 0 posts. Last posting by Ferris, May 10 12:29 pm


Choosing the Right Dog > If you LOVE DOGS and want a PUREBRED!

Ferris

Butterfly Ears
 
 
Barked: Thu Dec 24, '09 12:49am PST 
Something else that I wanted to add is that I consider a mutt and a cross-breed to be two separate things. A Multipoo would be a cross-breed because it's crossing two distinct breeds. A mutt is a dog who has multiple breeds in its pedigree and usually has other mutts behind it.

I would assume that a mutt is healthier. If you follow the laws of genetics, the more random the breeding is, the less likely two of the same genes (alleles) will be found in the unrelated individuals. In other words, for a puppy to inherit a genetic defect, in most cases, both the mother and father have to be carriers. Well, the less related the parents are to each other, the less likely it is that they will be carriers of the same defect.

IOW, if you have a child with a man whose not your relative, it is less likely that you and he will be carriers of a condition which would produce an afflicted child. It is said that everyone carries some kind of defect or another. Probability states that the less related the mates are, the less likely it is that they will have the same defect. Breeding co-efficient are used to determine the likelihood that a dog inherited two of the same genes (alleles) from a common ancestor. This is higher in most purebred dogs.

Purebred dogs are more likely to have a common ancestor. For one, many breeds were started with a small number of founding members so that most members of the breed can be traced back to the same few dogs. Two, in purebred dogs, one sire could have been used so much that a large number of dogs today trace back to him. Three, inbreeding is often intentionally done by breeders.

A cross-breed has a less likely chance of having the same ancestor so it should statistically be healthier. However, many of the breeds being crossed have the same health problems so it really doesn't help the situation by much. Someone wrote that hybrid vigor has to be across species. This isn't true. Sometimes it is, but other times it's simply the crossing of two separate lines which are both inbred (but are inbred on separate genes).

I will add that not every purebred breed is the same when it comes to its health problems. The Golden has a page long list of common health problems. My breed has one common health problem. Both are pure breeds but it is in my breed's favor that it evolved naturally, centuries ago, and the standard is not very restrictive. Find a breeder whose actively breeding for health, and the odds are in your favor that you will get a healthy long-lived animal.

The big problem, IMO, is that most puppy buyers simply don't have the resources available to research the pedigrees to the depth that they would need to in order to put the odds in their favor.

Merry Christmas!
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» There has since been 17 posts. Last posting by Lucy, Feb 3 8:40 pm


Choosing the Right Dog > If you LOVE DOGS and want a PUREBRED!

Ferris

Butterfly Ears
 
 
Barked: Thu Dec 24, '09 12:14am PST 
Well, as a show person, the one thing I'd recommend to a puppy buyer is to consider the health of the breed. As the documentary explained, some breeds have certain health conditions simply by default of them being that breed. The Rhodesian with its ridge is a perfect example. The brachycephalic breeds, by default of having flat faces, suffer from breathing problems. In mesocephalic (normal headed) breeds, such a trait would be viewed as a severe deformity and the puppy would be seen as a special needs pup. The truth is that the only way to correct these health issues would be to change the actual standard and the look of the dog. This, I think, would be a near impossible task. As was asked, where is the line? Do we breed down in size the giant breeds who live 5+ years less than smaller dogs?

Another thing is to select a breeder who values health over vanity. Being in the show world, I can tell you that inbreeding is extremely common. Grand-daughter to grandfather is very common and some breed half-siblings. Line breeding is considered the gold standard of breeding in the USA. Breeders generally say this isn't inbreeding, it's line-breeding. However, line-breeding isn't a scientific term; it's all inbreeding. IMO, I think inbreeding is ruing the purebred dog. It's breeding in health problems so rampantly that the health problems in some breeds are as predictable as the physical characteristics.

I'm also opposed to ridiculously restricting standards. Some standards require a dog be an exact height. Or lit imits the breed to only a few colors. IMO, limiting the gene pool so severely has a detrimental effect on the breed.

If someone wants a healthy dog, I think they need to ask for health testing results several generations back. They should also ask for the inbreeding co-efficient of the puppy. The higher the number, the more inbred the individual dog is.
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» There has since been 18 posts. Last posting by Lucy, Feb 3 8:40 pm


Dog Health > Bubble nose

Ferris

Butterfly Ears
 
 
Barked: Tue Dec 22, '09 7:18am PST 
This morning I woke up late so I was rushing around. But as far as I remember, my dog woke up fine. I guess about 30 minutes into our morning, after she had eaten and went outside, I noticed that she was having some kind of problem.

She looks to be producing some kind of clear liquid; I wouldn't say it is mucus. It's not think. I has the consistency of water. It's coming out of her nose when she sneezes.

It's more than a regular sneeze. I can hear the liquid. . . if that makes sense. She sounds like a Pug with bubbles in its nose.

She is a very small Papillon and she does make Pug like snorting sounds normally. I attributed that to a smaller than normal trachea. Well, she is super active and doesn't have any problems regarding her Pug sounds.

Today, it's not her normal snorting that I'm hearing. I'm hearing bubbles. Almost like she got soapy water in her nose and now she needs to sneeze it out. That is the best way I can describe it because it sounds just like that.

Anyway, I tried to take one of those suction things you use on babies and puppies right after they are born to suck out the mucus from their nose. It didn't have good suction so it didn't help.

However, after about 5 minutes she seems fine. She still seems to have the liquid in her nose, but it's not bothering her.
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» There has since been 1 post. Last posting by Tinker , Dec 22 8:08 am

Choosing the Right Dog > non-shedding small dog?
Ferris

Butterfly Ears
 
 
Barked: Fri Dec 18, '09 9:38pm PST 
There is no non-shedding dog. The longer the hair grows, the less the dog will shed (hairless breeds aside of course). However, by default, the longer the hair, the more grooming the dog requires. A single coated breed is typically better for allergy sufferers. Also, breeds less prone to skin problems are better. Sometimes, just because the dog is small, is enough. You should really take your husband to meet with a breeder to test his allergies.
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» There has since been 19 posts. Last posting by Toby, Feb 11 9:32 am


Choosing the Right Dog > Belgians: Malinois, Groenendael, Laekenois, Tervueren. What\'s the difference?

Ferris

Butterfly Ears
 
 
Barked: Mon Nov 9, '09 8:23pm PST 
I've been told by owners that Tervs are sweeter and Mals are more high drive. Gronendaels are prob more like Tervs. I've never met an Laekenois in person but it is the original variety.
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» There has since been 17 posts. Last posting by Cain, Nov 11 8:22 pm


Dogs & Travel > Has anyone imported a dog from Europe to USA?

Ferris

Butterfly Ears
 
 
Barked: Mon Nov 9, '09 8:14pm PST 
I imported two dogs from Poland. All that was required is that the pups be vaccinated by a vet. Breeders who have exported generally know what all needs to be done so you can talk to the breeder. It is a rather simple process to import from Europe.
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» There has since been 0 posts. Last posting by Ferris, Nov 9 8:14 pm


Grooming > Baths-- how often is too often?

Ferris

Butterfly Ears
 
 
Barked: Tue Oct 13, '09 3:45pm PST 
I bathe at least once a week and my oldest dogs are over ten years. I only use high quality products. You can find some in petedge.com
You don't have to use puppy shampoo from the better brands. Find what works best for your dogs.
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» There has since been 1 post. Last posting by Brady CGC, Oct 13 4:21 pm

Choosing the Right Dog > Prostate problems and Breeding
Ferris

Butterfly Ears
 
 
Barked: Thu Oct 8, '09 11:05am PST 
Tsuki, I thik as a responsible breeder,you do have to consider when it is convenient to have a litter. Breeding and whelping isn't something a responsible breeder takes lightly. If you are a school teacher, wouldn't it make sense to try to plan your breedings around the time when you have off from work?

Most breeders work year round so they I have to make sure that they have someone available to care for the pups while they are at work. Also, they have to be able to take days off work when the bitch is getting ready to whelp and to be prepared to miss a lot of work if there is a problem and the pups need to be tube fed.

I'm sure every breeder would love to stay home and not have to work, but because responsible breeding costs more money than it produces, it's just not an option for most.

Also, I think planning a breeding carefully and making sure that you are able to care for the mom and babies properly is a sign of a good breeder, not a bad one.

Breeders don't plan breedings so that they have time to catch their favorite soap on T.V. They do it so that they can assure the mom and babies get the best possible care.
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» There has since been 3 posts. Last posting by Tsuki, Kit, Kiba & Buckley, Oct 8 12:41 pm

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