Postings by J P

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Choosing the Right Dog > Smartest Breed of Dog?
J P

A DOG is for- LIFE.
 
 
Barked: Wed Sep 10, '08 8:46pm PST 
Fantastic Five, you said what I was going to say, and so well.applause
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» There has since been 30 posts. Last posting by Sirius Padfoot Black, Oct 23 12:23 pm

Choosing the Right Dog > Breeder Opinions about close relations
J P

A DOG is for- LIFE.
 
 
Barked: Wed Sep 10, '08 8:38pm PST 
I went back and read your statement better and then got even more confused when I read Keikos! I hope I’m understanding this.shrug

I believe you are saying that in the pedigree of the pups born there is one grandparent and one great grandparent that are the same dog. I think that puts the COI (from just that relative) at about 4.8, which is not terribly high. I cheat and use a program usually red face so don’t quote me on that.

That is definitely more distant inbreeding than I first had thought, and I agree with others is that a full pedigree would help to know more. Ask if they have calculated a COI on the litter. That will give you an idea.

When I was looking for my pups I actually looked for COIs under 3.5 and held to that, but that is just me. I'm a bit of a pick about this stuff. I found that that low a COI was very hard to find.
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» There has since been 2 posts. Last posting by "Selli" , Sep 11 8:38 am


Choosing the Right Dog > Breeder Opinions about close relations

J P

A DOG is for- LIFE.
 
 
Barked: Wed Sep 10, '08 6:00pm PST 
Ty, I know the point you were making was that this breeder is still probably a good one, and I would agree and probably a lot of thought went into this pairing. Unfortunately, I don't think a lot of thought was put into population genetics (not how this breeding could impact the pups, but how many breedings like this can affect the population of the breed). If one breeder does this, then another models it and does it, and that is how we get inbred populations.

These links explains much better than I can.

Extent of Inbreeding in Pedigree Dogs Revealed in New Study

Population Structure Study

For your own knowledge, the COI on the pups from a half brother mated to a half sister is 12.5%, and that is if there are no other common ancestors (which is rare). I believe that is what this mating is from your description?

I am a fan of John Armstrong, who studied COIs, and he showed that the chances of compromised health and a shorter lifespan in puppies starts at a COI level of about 6.5. Still he had allowances for up to about a '10' if breeders were using descretion.

I wouldn't purchase a puppy from them just on the fact that they have made this close a breeding. Myself, I would want to make that statement.

I believe, as purchasers, people need to be discouraging this and asking breeders to make different choices.

Of course we all have our own ideas and reasons for making choices.

If you do feel like reading here are a couple of links on inbreeding:

Inbreeding - Is it necessary - James E. Seltzer

Bowlingsite Inbreeding/Linebreeding COI

Inbreeding Coefficients & Coefficients of Relationship
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» There has since been 3 posts. Last posting by "Selli" , Sep 11 8:38 am


Rescue, Adoption & Happy Endings > Poll About Dogs And Locations

J P

A DOG is for- LIFE.
 
 
Barked: Thu Aug 7, '08 3:59pm PST 
1. Where are you located?

Edmonton, Alberta, Canada

2. What dogs are commonly found in the shelters in your area?

Labs and lab mixes, border collies and border collie mixes, shepherd /collie /golden retriever/husky mixes. We are starting to see some of the "bull" breeds, but not a lot.

3. What breed of dog has the hardest time getting adopted in your area?

Shepherd and Husky mixes seem to stay in the shelter /pound longer. We do not euthanize healthy and adoptable here, so they all get to stay as long as it takes.

4. What kinds of dogs are "in demand" in your area and would be easily adopted?

Anything under 35 pounds and that is relatively healthy and fairly young flies out of the shelter usually before they can even get it up on site. We have small dog rescues that take the smaller dogs that are a little harder to adopt (senior or in need of training and medication), so those usually go as well - to the rescue groups.

The large dog rescue here (NASAP) is the group that usually keeps dogs the longest and has quite the job finding homes as they take behaviorally challenging large dogs and if they get "the word" try to do it before temperament testing.
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» There has since been 14 posts. Last posting by Percy, Aug 18 5:18 pm


Dog Laws & Legislation > Once again I am frustrated by ignorant comments...

J P

A DOG is for- LIFE.
 
 
Barked: Sun Aug 3, '08 10:04am PST 
I think it is going to take continuing education and patience (people patience) and an understanding of the fear if the pitbull stereotype is going to be stopped.

I have a father who is fearful of the protective breeds and large breeds, and we grew up with that strongly influencing our thoughts. I believe many of these stereotypes are handed down generation to generation and that is hard to battle.

In regards to "yap yap breeds", I know the OP already changed that statement (thanks), but others have posted and seem to be OK with it.

I do get offended by the statement. When one generalizes and says "the small yap yap breeds" it just shows the thought is that all small dogs yap. Just as it is offensive to say all Bully breeds attack, it is offensive to say all small dogs are inclined to yap. I find it odd that one fights one kind of stereotyping while dispensing another.

It IS stereotyping that we are trying to stop - isn't it?

I have owned small yappers before, and I have owned big persistant barkers before. I currently own two dogs that are less inclined to bark than any dog that I have ever owned, and they are both under 15 pounds. My Husky out barks both of them - and stereotyping tells me that Huskies don't tend to be barkers!

It needs to be clear that dogs are each individuals.
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» There has since been 10 posts. Last posting by In loving memory of Lilo, Aug 6 12:03 am

Puppy Place > Puppy breaking my heart - crying in crate
J P

A DOG is for- LIFE.
 
 
Barked: Wed Jul 23, '08 4:56pm PST 
This is the process I used to crate train Missie - and I really suck at crate training. We have never crated at night though.

Precious Pets Crate Training How To

"Introducing the Crate to Your Puppy

In order that your puppy associate his/her kennel crate with comfort, security and enjoyment, please follow these guidelines:

1. Occasionally throughout the day, drop small pieces of kibble or dog biscuits in the crate. While investigating his new crate, the pup will discover edible treasures, thereby reinforcing his positive associations with the crate. You may also feed him in the crate to create the same effect. If the dog hesitates, it often works to feed him in front of the crate, then right inside the doorway and then, finally, in the back of the crate.

2. In the beginning, praise and pet your pup when he enters. Do not try to push, pull or force the puppy into the crate. At this early stage of introduction only inducive methods are suggested. Overnight exception: You may need to place your pup in his crate and shut the door upon retiring. (In most cases, the crate should be placed next to your bed overnight. If this is not possible, the crate can be placed in the kitchen, bathroom or living room.)

3. You may also play this enjoyable and educational game with your pup or dog: without alerting your puppy, drop a small dog biscuit into the crate. Then call your puppy and say to him, "Where's the biscuit? It's in your room." Using only a friendly, encouraging voice, direct your pup toward his crate. When the puppy discovers the treat, give enthusiastic praise. The biscuit will automatically serve as a primary reward. Your pup should be free to leave its crate at all times during this game. Later on, your puppy's toy or ball can be substituted for the treat.

4. It is advisable first to crate your pup for short periods of time while you are home with him. In fact, crate training is best accomplished while you are in the room with your dog. Getting him used to your absence from the room in which he is crated is a good first step. This prevents an association being made with the crate and your leaving him/her alone


So, when we weren't home, she was penned in the kitchen, with a place to pee (newspaper) water, food, and her crate for resting in. She was fully housetrained by 5 months, long before she was crate trained.
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» There has since been 2 posts. Last posting by Tucker, Jul 25 9:12 am


Puppy Place > Puppy breaking my heart - crying in crate

J P

A DOG is for- LIFE.
 
 
Barked: Wed Jul 23, '08 10:35am PST 
I went on a search for this article. There is so much that is written that is pro crate training but I believe the cons of crate training also need to get some attention. This is probably because I have seen crates overused too often. In the end, though, I do believe every dog does benefit from learning to get comfortable in a crate.

Select Warren Eckstein: The Case Against Crate Training

BTW. Our bed has a home-built queen size width padded step - 18 inches deep. It also serves as the dog's bed if they choose not to be snuggling with us. This works wonderfully if anyone is worried about dogs injuring themselves on and off the bed.
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» There has since been 4 posts. Last posting by Tucker, Jul 25 9:12 am


Puppy Place > Puppy breaking my heart - crying in crate

J P

A DOG is for- LIFE.
 
 
Barked: Tue Jul 22, '08 8:39pm PST 
I haven't read the whole thread but will say that I just cannot handle those heart breaking cries at night. The last two pups I had I crate trained - but not at night. I crate trained gradually during the day. At night they were in my bed, just as the other three puppies I have raised in my lifetime. I also don't crate to potty train. For that I use close supervision and lots of trips outside. All my pups, including the toy breeds, have been reliably house trained by 5 months. My last two were finally crate trained at about 9 months. I only crate train because I know they may need a "familiar safe place" to stay if they are ever babysat or at the vets.

The only dog that hasn't transitioned off the bed easily (onto the dog beds beside) was my Cavalier - who I got at 5 months of age fully crate trained by the breeder.

That works for me, for others crate training works. I just wanted to reiterate there are options and crate training doesn't have to happen at a terribly young age.
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» There has since been 8 posts. Last posting by Tucker, Jul 25 9:12 am


Choosing the Right Dog > Wht happens to the puppy that doesn't sell at the pet store?

J P

A DOG is for- LIFE.
 
 
Barked: Tue Jul 22, '08 8:14pm PST 
Well, I just went back and skim read this thread. I think it has been a very level headed discussion, which is wonderful.

I hope no one minds if I add an angle to it.

It is about the reasoning used behind "rescuing" puppies from pet stores.

I watch Cavalier rescue closely, and both of the big Cavalier rescues in the USA "purchase" used up mill mommas and cast off puppies at auctions. In effect they give money to the millers. I know they do this because those dogs face death if they don't sell - but isn't this similar to those that buy older pups from pet stores in hopes of saving them? Are they not enabling the miller - giving them money and making it easier for them?

Both circumstances stir up such a quandry. Neither pet store nor dog auction are places I could go without emptying my wallet to rescue. I know that so I just don't go and I donate to shelters instead, but I do understand the dilemna.

I guess these thoughts were stirred up by both "the road to hell is paved with good intentions" and "let's learn all the angles and confront them."
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» There has since been 33 posts. Last posting by , Aug 19 9:05 am

Choosing the Right Dog > Wht happens to the puppy that doesn't sell at the pet store?
J P

A DOG is for- LIFE.
 
 
Barked: Tue Jul 22, '08 7:56pm PST 
"Let's learn all the angles and confront them. Until we do, this problem stays. Rally onward! "way to goway to goway to go
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» There has since been 34 posts. Last posting by , Aug 19 9:05 am

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