Postings by Lola

GO!

(Page 1 of 15: Viewing entries 1 to 10)  
Page Links: 1  2  3  4  5  6  7  8  9  10  11  12  13  14  15  

Dog Health > soooo mad!!
Lola

Master Bug- Catcher
 
 
Barked: Fri Jul 13, '07 9:20am PST 
It is frustrating to know that your dog picked up an illness at a boarding kennel, but it's often by no fault of their own (or yours!). I worked at a boarding/daycare facility for a while. We were religious about sanitation, but would still occasionally have a client leave with an illness. Our dogs had free run in a play area all day so were exposed to lots of other dogs. We require all vaccinations to be updated and check on that very religiously. And even though I think we took as many precautions as possible, it happens!

If you have issues again with your regular pet sitter being unavailable you may want to try to find and in home boarding kennel. They can be a little harder to find, but are generally less stressful for your dog than a large kennel situation, better for socialization, and less chance of disease. Ask around at local vet offices and pet stores. Sometimes smaller boarding operations advertise in those kinds of places. Good luck and get well!
[notify]
» There has since been 10 posts. Last posting by Tucker, Jul 13 6:15 pm

Dog Health > Ear Issues (I think)
Lola

Master Bug- Catcher
 
 
Barked: Fri Jul 13, '07 8:52am PST 
As expected she's showed no issues today. It comes and goes so randomly! But it makes me feel better to know that others have had the same issue with no ill consequences. I'll certainly still keep an eye on her, but you've calmed my nerves. Thanks!
[notify]
» There has since been 0 posts. Last posting by Lola, Jul 13 8:52 am


Dog Health > Ear Issues (I think)

Lola

Master Bug- Catcher
 
 
Barked: Thu Jul 12, '07 8:18pm PST 
Lola has been having a little ear issue lately. She seems to tilt her head to the right a bit, shake her head more often, and scratch at that right ear more frequently. I've noticed this behavior with her before several months ago, but it went away within a couple of days all on its own. But it happened again a couple of weeks ago, this time lasting for about three days. I had a vet appointment later that week for vaccinations so I waited, since it didn't really seem to be bothering her. By the time of the appointment she was no longer showing symptoms of any ear problems. The vet checked her ears out and said there was nothing visibly wrong, that she may have just gotten a mosquito bite, but since she was no longer showing symptoms it was hard to be sure.

And now it's happening again. Off and on throughout the day today she has walked with her head tilted slightly to the right, and her right ear cocked slightly to the side. Upon close visual inspection there is no redness, no waxy build up, no dirt or other foreign objects, and no smell strange smell. Nothing that seems to indicate infection or mites. And the symptoms are so random and infrequent. She'll seem to favor the ear for 5 minutes and then be perfectly normal for hours after, then start the tilt again.

She is not in any pain and is not showing any other changes in behavior. Eating and drinking fine, good energy level, playful, and normal as ever. I'm not too worried since she doesn't seem to be affected, except the occasional head shake and ear scratch. I was just hoping someone might have a clue as to what this might be. It seems unlikely to me that it's just bug bites, since it's always the right ear. I'm slightly concerned about neurological problems, but if that were the case, I have no idea what could be done about it or if it's even actually a problem.

If it persists through the weekend I will take her to the vet again, but since the symptoms come and go so quickly and just a week ago her vet found nothing wrong, I'd rather not waste the time and money. Just hoping for a little dogster insight and experience. smile Thanks for reading!
[notify]
» There has since been 3 posts. Last posting by Lola, Jul 13 8:52 am


Service & Therapy Dogs > Why cant i find it?!

Lola

Master Bug- Catcher
 
 
Barked: Mon Jul 9, '07 4:26pm PST 
Some smaller cities and towns won't have groups that are easy to find. Definitely check out the Delta society website, but my guess is once you've done some training you'd have to go to Seattle for certification. But if no group exists in your area don't be discouraged! Nursing homes, hospices, and even hospitals may allow you and your dog visits without being a member of a specific visiting organization, as long as you can provide Delta Society (or similar) certification of temperament testing. Call around to local places you would be interested in visiting with your dog to do therapy work. If they already have a group of therapy dogs they can connect you with them, and if they don't, maybe you can start one! Good luck!
[notify]
» There has since been 0 posts. Last posting by Lola, Jul 9 4:26 pm


Service & Therapy Dogs > Finding a future therapy dog

Lola

Master Bug- Catcher
 
 
Barked: Sun Jul 8, '07 7:20am PST 
Thanks for the suggestions!

Ruya,
Your "book" was just what I was looking for! I have done a lot of research and have some experience volunteering with a therapy dog team at a local rehabilitation hospital (the dog is a Bernese Mountain Dog) but wanted a real insider's opinion on the things that may not be as obvious. I'm definitely looking for more of a calm cuddler. I have just discovered a reading dog program at our local library that could be fun. I'm looking for a regular commitment, so showing up is not a problem for me. smile I have my eye on a three-legged beagle at a local hound rescue. Even temperament, calm, loves to meet new people and get loved on. And it's an interesting twist, I think, that he has a disability. I'll definitely have to consider his stamina, but sounds like he's not very affected by his loss of limb. I hope to meet him this week.

Thanks again!
[notify]
» There has since been 1 post. Last posting by Ruya, Jul 8 7:31 am

Service & Therapy Dogs > Finding a future therapy dog
Lola

Master Bug- Catcher
 
 
Barked: Mon Jul 2, '07 1:51pm PST 
For several months now I have been considering adopting a second adult dog as a companion for Lola and new friend for the rest of the family. I would love to find a dog with potential to be trained for animal assisted therapy. As a youngster I volunteered at a school for kids with disabilities and loved to see the effects of their equestrian therapy program. One of the teachers trained her own dog as a therapy dog and he brought joy to those kids for years! Animal assisted therapy is such a great way to give back and I was hoping for advice on finding my future therapy dog. I know there are no guarantees and if it turns out our new family member doesn't have the temperament for that kind of work, it will still be a loved member of the family.

I am hoping to adopt an adult dog from a local rescue organization or shelter. I'm looking for suggestions of questions to ask foster parents about the dog, behavioral indicators that may not be obvious that would help/hinder the dog's chances of becoming certified, behavioral assessments that I can use while interacting with the dog. There are obviously some very important traits to look for, but do any of you with experience with service and therapy dogs have any hints or tips that only come from experience?

Or, I'm in the Austin, TX area if anyone knows of a potential therapy dog seeking a home!
[notify]
» There has since been 5 posts. Last posting by Ruya, Jul 8 7:31 am


Behavior & Training > great article on why dominace theory is lacking

Lola

Master Bug- Catcher
 
 
Barked: Mon Jan 29, '07 9:12am PST 
Indy,
I think the article is not saying being the pack leader is bad, but it is how you establish that dominance that makes the difference. Forcibly rolling your dog on it's back and pinning it to the floor (which some trainers advocate) is not an effective tool. But requiring your dog to work for all the things it wants, controlling resources, is a more effective way to establish yourself as pack leader. So it's not criticizing being "pack leader" for your dogs, it just advocates positive reinforcement instead of physical dominance as a way to assert this power.
[notify]
» There has since been 25 posts. Last posting by , Jan 29 8:54 pm


Behavior & Training > What the heck is THIS about now???

Lola

Master Bug- Catcher
 
 
Barked: Mon Jan 29, '07 8:57am PST 
Tido has probably decided that he's the alpha dog these days. These are all signs of a dog who feels he is superior and needs to protect his space and his things. You need to establish your dominance before problems do end up leading to aggressive behavior! And not just you, but everyone in your household. It often happens that the primary caregiver easily establishes themselves as the alpha, but the dog puts himself in the ranks between them and the rest of the "pack" and still shows dominant behavior to other members of the family.

I'm no expert, but here are a few things you can try to let Tido know that everything he wants comes from you, so you're the boss!

Each time you feed him, make him sit and look at you before you put down the food. If you give him a treat, make him perform a command. Even if you want to pet or cuddle him, make him sit or laydown first, on your command (not just because he does it anyway). Before he can get a toy he has to do something for you. If he is allowed on furniture or the bed he must be invited up. If he jumps up on his own, firmly say "No", guide him back down to the floor and make him stay there for several seconds before introducing a command like "couch" or "up" and invite him up on your own terms. These little things can work to establish your dominance and may help the other problems clear up without punishing his behavior.

Also practice giving and taking away toys often. Make sure that something good happens (like a treat) when you take the toy away so he doesn't feel like he's losing it.

He will be happier lower in the ranks because he won't feel like he has such responsibility to protect himself and his things! If he knows you can protect the house and family he will be calmer and more comfortable and hopefully eliminate any aggressive behavior.

I recommend that you seek the help of a professional trainer who does in home sessions. Catching things like this early is the best way to make your dog and family happy and safe!
[notify]
» There has since been 16 posts. Last posting by Indiana, Feb 2 11:09 am


Rescue, Adoption & Happy Endings > Permanent dog and multiple fosters

Lola

Master Bug- Catcher
 
 
Barked: Mon Jan 22, '07 7:52pm PST 
I just got a new foster, Carly, and Lola has started to really enjoy her company. They're wrestling on the couch together as we speak! I have fostered before, but never had a dog of my own at the same time. I was wondering how your permanent dogs have reacted to having multiple foster file through over time?

It's taken Lola about a week to really warm up to Carly. She was never aggressive towards her, just ignored her really. Now they've become great playmates!! But Carly has a couple of applications pending and people wanting to adopt her as soon as she's spayed this Friday, so Lola's playmate may soon be gone, and possibly replaced with another new foster.

Have your dogs had trouble adjusting to fosters coming in and out? I want to continue to help dog rescues and fostering seems a great way to do it, but I don't want Lola to suffer. I want her to continue to feel stable and loved. I don't want her to feel like her house is turned upside down every few weeks with a new arrival. Any advice helps. I know that each dog is different and we'll just have to see how Lola reacts with another new foster after Carly is gone, but I'd like to know what sorts of things to expect.
[notify]
» There has since been 4 posts. Last posting by Kiona CGC, Jan 23 10:15 am

Dog Health > half hound?
Lola

Master Bug- Catcher
 
 
Barked: Sun Dec 10, '06 5:17pm PST 
You look very much like a full beagle, but it's always hard to say. But beagles are hounds. There are many many different kinds of hound dogs, but English Foxhounds have a very similar coloring to you, though are much larger. But you could just be a beagle.
[notify]
» There has since been 4 posts. Last posting by , Dec 12 4:37 pm

(Page 1 of 15: Viewing entries 1 to 10)  
Page Links: 1  2  3  4  5  6  7  8  9  10  11  12  13  14  15  

PLEASE NOTE: Due to the rapid nature of forum postings, it's quite possible our calculation of the number of ensuing forum posts may be off by one or two or more at any given moment.