Postings by Natalie

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Puppy Place > My sanity!
Natalie

Bossy Aussie
 
 
Barked: Sat Oct 13, '12 11:24am PST 
If he's a border collie as his profile states, unfortunately you're probably going to be in for "more" of a handful as he gets older. I would be working on basic puppy manners and giving him things to think about such as busy bones and a frozen peanut butter kong during his downtime.

We rescued Natalie at 10 weeks and she's been "go go" ever since. She's not a border collie but is an Australian shepherd, which is very similar. Without at least a few training sessions throughout the day and a few games of intense Frisbee she will NOT settle. She also requires new commands to be taught every few days basically because of how quickly she learns them and she is so focused with that herding breed brain and no noise (because of being deaf) that she is proofed in many different places in no time.

It took us about a week straight of actual SCREAMING in order for Natalie to be crate trained. The method that finally worked was that we would put her in the crate and expect at first 30 seconds of silence and then one minute and then two minutes and so on...she figured out quickly that she would be let out and now she is 100% solid.

If you haven't already I would join a good high quality puppy class and start thinking about some outlets for his energy the two of you might enjoy as he gets older. smile
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» There has since been 0 posts. Last posting by Natalie, Oct 13 11:24 am

Sports & Agility > Catching a Frisbee
Natalie

Bossy Aussie
 
 
Barked: Fri Oct 12, '12 1:46pm PST 
Natalie REALLY loves frisbees. We've been playing with a "soft" doughnut disc for quite a while now so that she won't hurt her teeth or gums while teething, but I feel like she's kind of progressed beyond the "rollers". She runs so fast that often times she beats the roller to a destination because I trained an "around" where she circles me and starts running ahead before I release the frisbee.

I understand not to encourage jumping because of growth plates but I feel like we're at a point when we're supposed to start catching the frisbee on low throws.

Does anyone know how I should go about this? Should I put her in a stay and throw it to her?

When I throw it she usually will wait for it to hit the ground. Advice would be appreciated!! Thanks ahead of time!
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» There has since been 1 post. Last posting by Shayne CGC, RL2, Oct 12 9:15 pm


Choosing the Right Dog > Your Top Three

Natalie

Bossy Aussie
 
 
Barked: Wed Sep 19, '12 5:49pm PST 
Hmm won't be for quite a while hopefully but I'll bite. I tend to be a planner/thinker so I pretty much have my next dog though out.

1) Giant Schnauzer - I've done quite a bit of research on these dogs for a few years now, and every one I have met thus far I would snatch up in a heart beat. Bonkers about their personalities. This will be the next dog for me a few years down the road though.

The other two certainly won't happen but...

2) Akita - I have a soft spot for these guys. My grandfather had a couple of them when I was a little guy, but unfortunately they don't tend to mesh with our lifestyle.

3) GSD - Honestly, I love these dogs. Like many people I have a fond childhood memory of growing up with one of these, but the politics that surrounds them now and potential for problems is too much for me.
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» There has since been 27 posts. Last posting by Dot, Sep 27 7:55 pm


Dog Health > Can't do this anymore (heartworm prevention)

Natalie

Bossy Aussie
 
 
Barked: Tue Sep 11, '12 8:28am PST 
Our vet used to carry Advantage Multi which is a topical product instead of an oral tablet like trifexis. I can't remember if it has a tick aspect to it but it does do most of your common intenstinal worms, fleas, and is also a heartworm prevention.

We have the same problem with heartworm prevention, the big product here is also trifexis and our dogs don't do well with it orally and heartguard is not an option for us having two breeds with ivermectin sensitivity.
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» There has since been 24 posts. Last posting by Kip & Oogie, Sep 19 2:49 pm


Dog Health > Huge Scare Today

Natalie

Bossy Aussie
 
 
Barked: Fri Aug 31, '12 7:18am PST 
Thank you Sabi for sharing the story of your Dane. I'm very sorry for your loss.

We're both keeping in mind that because she does have a murmur we're probably going to still face issues down the road if she keeps it. But we are happy that it doesn't look like she's going to be taken from us anytime relatively soon.
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» There has since been 1 post. Last posting by Savannah Blue Belle, Aug 31 8:13 am

Dog Health > Huge Scare Today
Natalie

Bossy Aussie
 
 
Barked: Thu Aug 30, '12 11:13am PST 
I have a quick update on Natalie.

We just got home from picking up Natalie at the vet. Last night Natalie stayed with our veterinarian overnight to observe her sleeping cycles and have an ultrasound done in the morning. When they went to rouse her this morning a similar instance occurred but she was still breathing (the vet believes my wife may have caught her in an instance of very deep REM sleep which would cause her to not wake quickly). Which is really fantastic news.

They did a second set of x-rays along with an ultrasound today and we actually have good news! The vet noticed that in this set her bronchial tubes were enflamed and thinks that the small amount of liquid that has been causing coughing is due to bronchitis. He also did a stress test where he tested her resting heart rhythm vs her exercising rhythm and found only a slight murmur not the irregular pattern that he heard before. When he did the cardiac ultrasound her did not notice anything irregular so we're very very ecstatic with this news.

We have a follow-up appointment scheduled for two-weeks, but other than that at this point she has a clear bill of health other than medication for bronchitis. He did say we wound have to keep an eye on the murmur if it didn't go away but many dogs live really normal lives with a grade 1 so we're AOK with that. We have our fingers crossed that that is what it is. He's sending our xrays off to a board certified radiologist to get a second opinion on both sets but so far so good big grin
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» There has since been 7 posts. Last posting by Savannah Blue Belle, Aug 31 8:13 am


Dog Health > Huge Scare Today

Natalie

Bossy Aussie
 
 
Barked: Wed Aug 29, '12 11:16am PST 
He doesn't think it's CHF. She has a heart beat that sounds almost as irregular as a PDA but only when she is active so he believes it may be a physical abnormality such a hole in one of the ventricles. He's going to do an ultrasound when the machine comes into his practice again. He put her on lasix because she does have some fluid buildup in the thorax.

Unfortunately he's told us if the test is preformed and it is what he believes it to be there isn't much in the way of treatment besides some type of surgical correction which would need to be done at our vet school. The surgery itself as a very low success rate and is very expensive. All we can do really is wait and see. The surgical intervention isn't really going to be financially doable for us...we have a savings account for pet health expenses but nothing that would cover the cost that would accrue from our vet school. The diagnostics alone there are outrageous in price. frown
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» There has since been 12 posts. Last posting by Savannah Blue Belle, Aug 31 8:13 am


Dog Health > Huge Scare Today

Natalie

Bossy Aussie
 
 
Barked: Tue Aug 28, '12 4:07pm PST 
That was our first question also. From what we've found no. The problems that occur from the double merle gene are due to lack of pigmentation. Which would result in eyeproblems/blindness (she does have this she has starburst pupils that do not allow her to dilate her eyes normally but she can see), and deafness (she is 100% deaf in both ears). There hasn't been any other congenital defects that are linked to the double merle gene.

We don't know anything at all about her lineage though, she is a rescue dog from presumably bad breeding (seeing as she is double merle it is doubtful whoever was breeding her was paying much mind to health tests).

Our vet has her on furosemide to help relieve liquid build up in the chest cavity in attempt to prevent this from happening again, but at the moment the episode is idiopathic. We did notice that when she "woke up" her lips were very greyish not the usual pink that they are now. So presumably that is from lack of oxygen.
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» There has since been 15 posts. Last posting by Savannah Blue Belle, Aug 31 8:13 am


Dog Health > Huge Scare Today

Natalie

Bossy Aussie
 
 
Barked: Tue Aug 28, '12 2:49pm PST 
When we woke up this morning and went to let Natalie out of her crate she would not wake up. She will usually wake up from a very gentle touch or just the light shining in when we remove the sheet from her crate. Today we tried that and shaking her crate but to no avail. Upon further inspection we realized that she was not breathing...

I had been in our bedroom going about our morning routine during this finding and was notified when my wife came running in crying. Now my wife worked for quite a few years as a veterinary assistant at an emergency clinic here in town so I believed what she had to say about checking her signs. But...within about a minute I heard barking and after running back into the room she was running around like nothing had happened eek

Our vet saw her earlier today but so far we haven't been able to come up with anything. We had an appointment scheduled because we had been noticing coughing in the mornings and throughout the day so our vet ordered x-rays thinking it was a heart problem but that doesn't seem to be the issue. We've been ordered to keep an eye on her because as far as we can tell at this point everything seems to be okay. But we are terrified of crating her to sleep or to leave the house tomorrow for work. We're so afraid that something like that will happen again so we haven't even been able to let her nap for more than two hours for fear of sleep apnea or something of the sort.

Has anyone else experienced or even heard of anything like this? Both we and our vet seem to be at a loss right now.
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» There has since been 17 posts. Last posting by Savannah Blue Belle, Aug 31 8:13 am

Puppy Place > Growling Puppy
Natalie

Bossy Aussie
 
 
Barked: Thu Aug 23, '12 9:17pm PST 
Wow! Taking on two puppies at once is a huge undertaking!

A 2 month old puppy that is growling/snapping when being picked up or touched should not be ignored. You need to rule out that the reason for the aversive reaction isn't due to her being uncomfortable or injured in someway, so a vet appointment, if you haven't been already, should be in order.

Secondly I second the previous poster who mentioned a puppy class. Especially with having two puppies at once. You will need to get them into separate puppy classes or at the very least a puppy class where they are handled individually. Mention to your trainer what is going on behaviorally with your puppy so that you can work on touch sensitivity and getting her used to being handled. A dog of any size should be able to be safely interacted with.
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» There has since been 0 posts. Last posting by Natalie, Aug 23 9:17 pm

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