Postings by Bello

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Raw Food Diet > He liked chicken just fine until last night...now he won't touch it
Bello

Herr Bello ist- nicht ein- Mensch!
 
 
Barked: Wed Sep 11, '13 7:57pm PST 
In the book Pukka's Promise, Ted said Pukka would often refuse what he was offered, and Ted would just put it back and get him something else out, Ted thought of it as his dog just not being in the mood for that particular thing. I thought it was interesting (his dog was fed raw, though he has more money than I do to have plenty of different proteins for Pukka to be picky about, mine personally don't). We do often don't want the same thing day after day, but we get mad when our dogs decide they don't want the same thing, or they decide they don't want that. Granted, if you can't find other meats to substitute the chicken for a few days then you will probably need to go the starving him out route, but maybe just try not offering him any chicken for around a week, and see if that changes his mind.
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» There has since been 3 posts. Last posting by , Sep 20 8:15 pm

Raw Food Diet > Feeding raw in an apartment
Bello

Herr Bello ist- nicht ein- Mensch!
 
 
Barked: Thu Sep 5, '13 7:31am PST 
Do you have any where in you apartment that is tile/linoleum where you can put the towel? That way he WANTS to keep the meat over the towel. Possibly buying a no slip rug or something for him to eat on, in case the towel is bunching up and stuff, that way it doesn't bunch up and leaves him with more room. I second the crate/ex-pen, but realize you are in an apartment so those might take a bit of room if you don't already have them set up. Do you possibly have a balcony he could eat on?

I'm also on the side of not reprimanding him, but my two can be food aggressive, so eating and not getting any trouble go well together for preventing it.
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» There has since been 8 posts. Last posting by Sky, Sep 10 6:35 pm


Behavior & Training > Does anyone know how to teach or unteach lifting leg to pee?

Bello

Herr Bello ist- nicht ein- Mensch!
 
 
Barked: Tue Aug 20, '13 12:08am PST 
You said about half the time he stills pees not lifting his leg, have you tried giving him a food reward when you catch him not lifting his leg? I know lifting his leg is more than likely reinforcing on its own so it could be a difficult habit to break, but maybe that would work. Someone mentioned a pee post which I think it a brilliant idea. If you don't have any luck with plants, maybe try putting up a row of posts along that fence so that he can pee on the posts, he would still be peeing on his favorite side of the yard, but the posts are far enough away from the neighbor's fence that he doesn't pee on their stuff. There is also the added benefit of still being able to play with the boxer. They sell stuff at the pet stores for potty training dogs that you can spray in places you would the dog TO pee, you could buy some of that and spray it on the posts for extra incentive to pee on them instead of the fence line, and try to reinforce those habits with a food reward as well. That's a whole slew of reinforcing stuff (peeing vertically, scent to encourage him, and food reward), and even if you can't get him to quit peeing along the fence, maybe after he pees on a couple posts, he won't have a steady stream to pee and instead just drops and your neighbor's stuff is still fine.
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» There has since been 2 posts. Last posting by , Aug 21 9:51 am


Behavior & Training > Do you "do" Day Care? Please share!

Bello

Herr Bello ist- nicht ein- Mensch!
 
 
Barked: Sat Aug 10, '13 3:01pm PST 
I have friends that have worked at PetSmart and Camp Bow Wow. And the stories they have told me have left me realizing that even if my dogs were friendly enough to go to day care, they wouldn't. The way the other employees treats the dogs is incredible (in a bad way) and if management would make the people follow the rules they wouldn't be so bad. But they don't, so both of them are pretty bad.
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» There has since been 0 posts. Last posting by Bello, Aug 10 3:01 pm


Behavior & Training > Hello, everyone first post on here ! Recall with northern breeds and independent dogs??

Bello

Herr Bello ist- nicht ein- Mensch!
 
 
Barked: Thu Jul 25, '13 1:16pm PST 
I think the going to new places is defintiley a good idea, mainly because if you go to enough good places, well then they will -slightly- lose their allure and she won't be as bad. Proof, proof, proof. It sounds like you have done a lot of the right things, and Bello was a tad bit like your girl in that as soon as the leash came off, he stopped caring. I once went to a pet store and they love to ask if I need help (and to be obnoxious because I get sick of being asked 8 billion times), I asked them what the best treats they had "that dogs go crazy for for teaching a dog to come when called." They took this to mean, "I want training advice." And proceeded to tell me to put him on a leash, ask him to come, and then drag him to me. To teach him to come. I laughed, I always laugh when I think about it. That might work for some dogs, but this dog isn't stupid. When that leash comes off, he knew I couldn't do anything too him. Luckily, he sticks around and doesn't take off running.

I think someone sort of suggested it, but make it so that she can't instantly slip out the door if someone leaves it cracked, put up a baby gate to keep her away from the door so she has to get past the baby gate and the door. For coming when called when she escapes, I have a feeling you will be fighting a losing battle. My Nana has a husky/lab/GSD/chow mix and for the longest time they thought he didn't know how to come when called (different scenerio from you) because he would run and dash away from them when outside. Turns out that was an "only when I shove through the door and escape" thing. If he is purposely let out, he comes when called like a champ, when he escapes? No chance in hell. He knows that he is just going to be caught and put back in the house. He is more handler oriented then your dog (sounds like), but for us to get him back in the house, we just walk back into the house and leave the door open. We aren't chasing him, he gets bored with in a few minutes and walks back in the house. Once he is inside we shut the door. So that's just to say, when it comes to getting out of the house, you might not ever convince her coming is worth it. Management would be the big thing there, making it really difficult to dash out. Teaching her to wait at the door anytime you exit or leave. Sometimes she gets to go with you, sometimes she doesn't, and hopefully she'll learn to like gambling, and that by waiting "this might be the time" she gets to go.
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» There has since been 5 posts. Last posting by Tyler , Jul 26 7:43 am

Behavior & Training > Hello, everyone first post on here ! Recall with northern breeds and independent dogs??
Bello

Herr Bello ist- nicht ein- Mensch!
 
 
Barked: Thu Jul 25, '13 2:17am PST 
Can't help you much, but I was going to say if she's a huge escape artist like you say, instead of a long line, you might consider a tether so she can't chew through it (for when she is attached to you in the house or in the backyard, for running in parks I would think a normal drag line would be fine since she won't be focused on needing to be free, watch out for rope burn though!). And if you start tying her out in the backyard make absolutely sure she can't reach the fence with her tether. And I do suggest tying her out in the yard so she can no longer jump it. Also, Bello, who has husky in him, and only acted up when he was younger and wasn't allowed to get as much exercise (injured), would dig up tie outs when he was in the backyard, and just run around with a chunk of metal behind him. So find something to attach it too that is chew proof and dig up proof (like a tree). I also suggest more exercise as another dogster said. If you could do biking with her, you can get more exercise in for her with less effort from you, and it doesn't require her to be free to do it. Good luck!

I know you said you like people like Karen Pryor and what not, I'm assuming you have done clicker training with her? And have used it for teaching recall? Starting in the house where there isn't an environment to compete with. How is she inside with recall? Have you tried running away from her to get her to come back, especially if she is on a line, call her name, and start running away from her while still calling excitedly and pulling on her line, applying pressure, but not forcing her to come to you, but at least head the direction you are going (to come she would have to put slack in the line on her own, instead of being at the end of the line and encouraged to go your way). It also might be worth looking into the premack principle if you don't already know what it is. Use the environment to your benefit. For Bello, he loves to run, so I would ask him to come, and if he decided too, no treats for him we would just take off running down the street for a little bit. I didn't do it with him long, mainly because I'm not a runner in any form (I prefer walking thank you very much), but while I was I noticed a better response from him. If she wants to go sniff a tree or bush, don't let her until she does something you ask (like come!).

The line will be your bestie until she starts learning to come. I know it is tempting to let her offleash, to let her be free and run (such as at the park, in your backyard), but you can't. Because when she gets free and refuses to come, and you have to chase her down, it isn't going to be good for her overall training and could become a set back when it comes to teaching recall.
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» There has since been 12 posts. Last posting by Tyler , Jul 26 7:43 am


Food & Nutrition > Grrrrrrrrr! Those Pesky Spambots

Bello

Herr Bello ist- nicht ein- Mensch!
 
 
Barked: Thu Jul 4, '13 8:57pm PST 
But guys I need a fake pass port. And whatever else they are advertising. I need it. And thankfully they came to a dog website to convince me that I needed this stuff.
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» There has since been 38 posts. Last posting by Flicka ~ CGC, Aug 8 7:56 pm


Raw Food Diet > Feel bad for kibble eaters?

Bello

Herr Bello ist- nicht ein- Mensch!
 
 
Barked: Tue Jul 2, '13 4:31pm PST 
The only time I feel bad is when the dogs clearly aren't doing well on the kibble they are on. My two are upset that they aren't on kibble. laugh out loud They have grown bored with raw and recently when I went out of town I offered them both a bowl of kibble and a bowl containing the raw they would have eaten that night, BOTH of those fools chose those little round pellets, so don't geel too bad for other dogs. wink Sometimes when I see a dog with a lot of tarter build up on their teeth I have to resist the urge to toss them a RMB or something though.
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» There has since been 12 posts. Last posting by Dogster HQ, Jul 3 1:51 pm


Raw Food Diet > How do your dogs feel about eating kibble?

Bello

Herr Bello ist- nicht ein- Mensch!
 
 
Barked: Sun Jun 9, '13 3:30pm PST 
I'm going to Germany in a few days, and decided that instead of worrying about cutting up more raw, and having my mom have to feed it to Bello and Brittany, just to come home and more than likely need to run and pick up more meat, I'd just put them on Orijen for the two weeks I'm gone. They've been on raw for over two years (minus the week we went to Florida). When we first switched to raw, they both thought it was the greatest thing ever and would barely glance at kibble offered before heading towards that turkey neck or what have you. But now after two years, I think they have grown a bit bored by it, silly things don't realize how many dogs would love to trade with them, and get super excited about eating kibble. At least when I offer it as treats. They also frequently (mainly Bello), when visiting houses with other dogs, rush to where the kibble is kept in an effort to eat it before I can put it up.

So I was wondering if you have found that with time your dogs have lost interest in the excitement of eating raw? Are they more excited about kibble now with no longer getting it every day then they were before? And how long have you been on raw (since the less time you have been on it, the less likely they are to be bored with it)?
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» There has since been 9 posts. Last posting by Savannah Blue Belle, Jun 10 8:06 am

Behavior & Training > Does your dog have an arch nemesis?
Bello

Herr Bello ist- nicht ein- Mensch!
 
 
Barked: Mon Jun 3, '13 11:11pm PST 
Bello and my neighbor's GSD have an equal hatred for each other. Have been in two pretty bad fights that ended with Bello bleeding in both of them thanks to my neighbors believing they have their dog under voice control. After the second one I think they successfully learned they don't. It also helps that our neighborhood talks and I told everyone else that if it happened again I was calling animal control (which I hate to do, since I'm punishing the dog by getting him taken away and not the owners).
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» There has since been 4 posts. Last posting by MIKA&KAI, Jun 5 7:06 am

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