Postings by Merlin

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Dog Health > Heartworm preventative help
Merlin

Mischief Managed
 
 
Barked: Sun Mar 4, '12 11:43am PST 
Both ivermectin (Heartguard) and milbemycin oxime (Interceptor, Trifexis) can be toxic to Collies and collie types at high doses, but at the dose used for monthly prevention, they are equally safe.

From the American Working Collie Association: Two common medications administered in an oral monthly tablet for prevention of heartworm (ivermectin and milbemycin oxime) have been given to Collies "pure" for the mutation mdr1-1Δ without incident. These two forms of heartworm prophylaxis are equally safe at the monthly prophylaxis dose, and both are toxic at higher doses.

Much more reading on the AWCA website: http://www.awca.net/drug.htm

Trifexis is milbemycin oxime + spinosad, and I was able to find one study that found spinosad to be effective against brown dog ticks.

Snyder, Cruthers, and Sloan (2009): "This pilot efficacy study demonstrated that a single oral treatment with technical spinosad in gelatin capsules, at 50 and 100mg/kg, provides high efficacy against existing R. sanguineus infestations within 24h of dosing, and suggests that there is some post-treatment residual tick control in dogs for up to 1 month."

If my math is correct, one dose of Trifexis (or Comfortis) would deliver between 60-25 mg/kg of spinosad. The study didn't test doses lower than 50 mg/kg, or other species of ticks, and I'm not sure how well-founded the "control for up to 1 month" claim is (don't have access to the full text), but it seems believable that Trifexis/Comfortis would provide at least moderate tick control.
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» There has since been 0 posts. Last posting by Merlin, Mar 4 11:43 am

Rescue, Adoption & Happy Endings > Don't you hate having to choose? *SIGH*
Merlin

Mischief Managed
 
 
Barked: Thu Mar 1, '12 10:54pm PST 
I am SO grateful for those of you who do rescue. I cannot imagine how difficult it must be to make these types of decisions. Either way, you are saving lives, and enriching the lives of others. Thank you so much for what you do.

And goodness, I would snatch that black and white pup up in a second.
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» There has since been 4 posts. Last posting by Sarah, CW-SR, CW-G1, CGC, Mar 2 4:18 pm


Raw Food Diet > raw beef tendons--a little worried

Merlin

Mischief Managed
 
 
Barked: Thu Mar 1, '12 9:44pm PST 
Merlin isn't on a raw diet but he does get raw snacks fairly often, and I recently picked up some frozen beef tendon (cut into ~8 inch pieces). I gave it to him frozen and supervised carefully because I have read of dogs just swallowing the whole piece.

In Merlin's case, I was actually quite impressed by how diligently he chewed off "safe"-sized pieces (after dancing around it and barking excitedly...). A lot of chewing! I didn't hold it for him, I just sat next to him and watched him work.

Definitely a "know your dog" and supervision required type of thing, and I'm not sure that I would bother with it again, but my pup did well with and seemed to enjoy it.
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» There has since been 0 posts. Last posting by Merlin, Mar 1 9:44 pm


Behavior & Training > Tucked lip- what does it mean?

Merlin

Mischief Managed
 
 
Barked: Thu Feb 16, '12 9:42pm PST 
Occasionally, Merlin will seem to tuck his upper lip under on one side. It looks almost like he's lifting the lip without drawing it back, and it's only on one side with no upper teeth exposed. It's difficult to explain and I have no pictures of him doing it, but it is the expression featured in this gallery: http://susannahcharleson.com/dog-gallery.html

At first I thought that his lip was just getting caught on his teeth, but after watching carefully, it looks like he is actively doing it. I could be mistaken.

I can't really identify the context for it, either. Sometimes he'll be looking out the window, other times, I don't know, maybe we'll be playing ball, or I'll just notice it randomly. I usually ask him, "what's that face for?" and he'll stop doing it. Body language is usually alert but otherwise neutral, neither fearful nor confrontational.

I'm curious, does anyone know what this expression might mean? Or is it really just a case of the lip getting caught? I checked google and the only explanation/theory that I could find was here: http://thewholedog.org/wholedognews/?p=260 Where the author proposed that it was a thoughtful expression. Seems reasonable, but I would love to see what insights others might have.
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» There has since been 9 posts. Last posting by Fireside's Twilight Princess, Feb 17 6:24 pm


Behavior & Training > Tucked lip- what does it mean?

Merlin

Mischief Managed
 
 
Barked: Thu Feb 16, '12 9:41pm PST 
Double posted, sorry!
Post is here: http://www.dogster.com/forums/Behavior_and_Training/thread/736326
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» There has since been 0 posts. Last posting by Merlin, Feb 16 9:41 pm

Dog Health > Is this a scam?
Merlin

Mischief Managed
 
 
Barked: Fri Feb 3, '12 7:10pm PST 
Sounds like a scam to me, too. In fact, I believe that I read on another forum that these breeders are often vendors for the supplements. So basically, you're supposed to keep lining their pockets long after you've taken the pup home.
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» There has since been 11 posts. Last posting by , May 18 7:50 am


Behavior & Training > Licking of feet

Merlin

Mischief Managed
 
 
Barked: Sun Jan 8, '12 7:49am PST 
If he is doing it only when left alone and other allergy symptoms subsided with changes in diet, it sounds like separation anxiety. The fact that he never licks his paws around you, only when alone, and DOES exhibit other allergy reactions in your presence, is significant in my opinion. Also the fact that it seems worse after you haven't left the house in a while- dogs enjoy routine and sudden changes in it (especially if changes involve being left alone) can be triggers for anxiety.

As Sanka suggested, the behavior might initially have been triggered by allergies, but it has probably become his way of calming himself in your absence.
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» There has since been 2 posts. Last posting by , Jan 9 10:41 am


Behavior & Training > Attacked by 2 GSDs last night.

Merlin

Mischief Managed
 
 
Barked: Sat Jan 7, '12 11:01pm PST 
About the exact same thing happened to Merlin and I on one of our walks a few months ago. Merlin was about 8 months old. The people at the end of the street have two GSDs, they happened to be loose in the yard as we were walking by and the owners didn't see us in time to restrain them (and we didn't see them). The dogs charged across the lawn at us, barking madly, and went after Merlin. I just did my best to defend him. He was terrified, hackles up and teeth bared. The owners were able to control the dogs fairly quickly, but the minutes in between were very scary.

Merlin was okay, not even a scratch. We finished the walk like nothing had happened. He takes a moment to feel comfortable around unfamiliar big dogs so I was concerned about the effect the attack would have on him. We went to the dog park the day after (made sure he was okay before letting him loose) and I made a point of walking past the same house (and making sure the dogs weren't out) in the following days.

And he was fine! We have since been approached by other large, loose dogs on walks (rural area), including a much friendlier GSD, and they've been positive experiences. He plays with GSDs at the dog park. In fact, he really hit it off with one today. Recently, we walked past the same house while one of the dogs was out on a line. The dog barked bloody murder at us, Merlin switched to my other side (further away from the dog), but aside from that kept walking as usual.

I would think that if they seemed unruffled and returned to the site with no problems, they're fine. Particularly since no one was hurt and the pup didn't react much in the first place. It may ease your mind if you can let them interact with a different GSD that you know is friendly, monitoring carefully of course, but chances are the dogs are already over it. Even though Merlin was probably dandy the minute we walked away, witnessing him be okay and even very friendly with other GSDs and loose dogs helped ME let it go.
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» There has since been 1 post. Last posting by MIKA&KAI, Jan 8 5:08 am


Behavior & Training > Off, Drop it, and Alternatives to "Down"?

Merlin

Mischief Managed
 
 
Barked: Thu Jan 5, '12 5:26pm PST 
Merlin loves tug, so I will give that a try. At worst, he'll have fun. ;D

I will start teaching him jump up/off tonight, thank you for the idea!

When I first brought him home, Merlin was a 6-month-old, bitey terror. Time-outs helped stop the piranha frenzies, and he responded well to OUCH! (yelping inspired a response similar to Zephyr's) + ignoring, so now he is gentle when he puts teeth on skin. I don't mind it too much, but a cease command is needed for when he gets a little too feisty, particularly because he does go for ankles sometimes. He doesn't hurt, but it does become inappropriate. Those lists are great and I may wind up using Aus as well, it's got a nice stern sound to it.

Thank you all for your help!
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» There has since been 0 posts. Last posting by Merlin, Jan 5 5:26 pm

Behavior & Training > Off, Drop it, and Alternatives to "Down"?
Merlin

Mischief Managed
 
 
Barked: Thu Jan 5, '12 12:20pm PST 
Merlin is a counter surfer! Sometimes he pops up just to see what's happening on the counter, which is admittedly very, very cute, particularly because he farts EVERY TIME, but he's also nabbed himself some pretty big scores, like chicken breasts and a T-bone steak. Obviously that's due to human negligence and we (I live with my parents) have been trying to be diligent about not reinforcing the behavior any further. Anyway, that's the background, I guess. The question is, what's a good way to go about teaching a good "off" cue, as in "get all four paws on the floor, you little stinker"?

At first, my parents were telling him "DOWN!" which was confusing my training with him for down, as in lie down. I asked them to start using "off" instead, and we've all been pretty consistent with it, and he does respond, but I think at this point he is more responding to tone of voice than the cue itself.

The issue, I guess, is that Merlin still nips (actually, with his bite inhibition it's more like mouthing now, and I don't mind it but I would like to be able to tell him to stop) and I'm not really sure what cue to use instead of "off" as in "get your teeth off me/stop chewing on me." Can anyone recommend some alternative verbal cues for this, and also for down?

Finally, I've been trying to teach Merlin a good "drop it" so that we can play fetch and tug, and also so that I can teach him to put his toys away. He kind of gets the idea, but unless he's distracted by a treat, he'll drop it and then snatch it back up as soon as I try to reach for it. Anyone have any experience with this?
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» There has since been 5 posts. Last posting by Merlin, Jan 5 5:26 pm

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