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Service & Therapy Dogs > New Dogster SD Team + SD Gear Suggestions
Mochi

The Big Cheese
 
 
Barked: Sun Jan 12, '14 10:45pm PST 
Hi Peach! Mochi is a small dog as well, weighing in about 14 lbs. She is a Chinese Crested mix, and is also a PSDIT. We are from North Carolina, and struggle too to be seen as a serious working team and not a fru fru pet dog.

Anyway, I totally forgot what I was going to say, so nice to meet you and we look forward to seeing you guys around.

-Ariel and SDIT Mochi
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» There has since been 2 posts. Last posting by Flicka ~ CGC, Jan 16 9:19 am

Service & Therapy Dogs > How to find a trainer for self-training of service dog
Mochi

The Big Cheese
 
 
Barked: Sun Dec 22, '13 11:43am PST 
A few questions for you:
Have you ever trained a service dog before, even if it wasn't for you?
Have you ever trained a dog before to a high level of obedience?
Have you ever owned a Shiba Inu before?
Have you talked to people who have had Shiba SDIT's?
Have you talked to any Shiba owners (NOT breeders) about their dog/s?

If the answer to all those things is yes, a Shiba Inu MAY be a decent dog to keep on the table for service work. I've known of two Shiba SDIT's, both of which washed out due to "things characteristic of the breed". I love Shibas for all the reasons you listed.

However, Shibas can be possessive of resources, dog aggressive, and prey driven. Training can be difficult even for experienced trainers as they are stubborn and highly independently minded.

Lastly: A quote from a Shiba Inu Breed site: Early training and socialization go a long way in helping the Shiba Inu get along with other dogs and animals, but it's not a guarantee. He can be aggressive toward other dogs and he will chase animals he perceives as prey. Training and keeping him on leash are the best ways to manage the Shiba Inu with other dogs and animals.

All I can say is good luck. If it's the size you're after there are plenty of more biddable dog sin the size range. But if you're hellbound and determined, I suggest finding a trainer who has experience working with difficult to train breeds, and service dog training experience prior to bringing home a dog.
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» There has since been 11 posts. Last posting by Baloo, Dec 30 3:23 pm


Service & Therapy Dogs > Want to help a SD team and get a cool shirt out of it?

Mochi

The Big Cheese
 
 
Barked: Fri Dec 20, '13 8:42pm PST 
I could be wrong but I would be remiss to wear such a shirt. I know someone would be offended by it, and could cause issues for me and my dog as a team. I dunno. I guess that's just my opinion.
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» There has since been 2 posts. Last posting by Queen Belladonna PSDiT, Dec 21 12:38 pm


Service & Therapy Dogs > Another Suspected Faker

Mochi

The Big Cheese
 
 
Barked: Thu Dec 12, '13 6:41pm PST 
Brady is your first service dog, correct? And has been in training for about 6 months or less, right? I'm assuming he's not perfect, and even though you may have educated yourself on the ins and outs of SD etiquette, it still doesn't make you a perfect trainer/handler, and again, still doesn't make his behavior stellar, everywhere you go, 100% of the time.

"Faker" is very equivalent to "fire." I'm not totally convinced that a small or even moderate portion of the "faker" problem is from legitimate handlers with true disabilities undercutting other legitimate handlers and their legitimate service dogs who are either doing something "socially incorrect" or are having an off day, as previously mentioned. If you scream "faker/fire" in the middle of a store with every dog you see committing what you deem to be an infraction, businesses do one of two things, they treat ever dog who enters their business as a faker, or they allow all dogs in regardless of legitimacy simply out of fear of prosecution.

We as a community tend to have elitist views, and I'm not going to say I've not been guilty of harboring such views previously. Of course there are those who ruin it for all, either intentionally or not, through their actions. For instance, you mentioned "purse dogs". Mochi is a legitimate SDIT. She also happens to be dyed green at the moment, wear a sweater to work most days due to her thin coat, and happens to weigh 13 lbs. You could argue that there are some little dogs that can be service dogs. I would argue back that you're being a bit closed minded if you assume that any little dog you see making any infraction is a faker. Etiquette and law are two very different things. Etiquette dictates that a service dog shouldn't sniff merchandise, or pull on the leash. However, there is no where that says that LEGALLY a service dog can be removed solely on the grounds of poor etiquette and/or behavior. Legally, a service dog may be removed from a place of business if it is displaying signs of aggression, is inappropriately toileting, or "...when doing so (allowing entrance to a SD) would result in a fundamental alteration to the nature of the business. Generally, this is not likely to occur in restaurants, hotels, retail stores, theaters, concert halls, and sports facilities. But when it does, for example, when a dog barks during a movie, the animal can be excluded."

Essentially, the above statement, pulled directly off of the ADA website, would allow a dog to sit quietly on a chair next to the handler, or be allowed to drink from a glass at a restaurant, or something equally heinous in the SD community.

"But it's common sense not to do XYZ!" Common sense goes out the window when dealing with higher degrees of many disabilities. I for one, have a tic disorder that prevents me from fully thinking through many decisions before acting upon them. I have certainly allowed my SD to lay across my lap grounding me into reality in the chair in a store at the mall. It was brief, and it was helpful to me, but to you, if you were to walk by with Brady, in that moment I definitely did look like a able bodied young adult with a tiny green dog laying idly across my lap. Now I know different, but unless you know the full story, you're not one to call faker.

Unless someone actually admits to you that they are not disabled, and are toting around a pet, you have no right to automatically call faker. And unless you expect that your dog will never screw up on duty, or that you will never have a judgement lapse, I highly suggest you reconsider what a "faker" is and whether or not you'd like it if the tables were turned on you.

I apologize for the lengthy novel, but I feel this is an important subject to broach.
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» There has since been 11 posts. Last posting by Harley, SD, CGC, TDI, Jan 6 10:36 am


Service & Therapy Dogs > Training to stop a behavior.

Astra

Super Star
 
 
Barked: Mon Oct 7, '13 6:32pm PST 
Best option is turn it onto a game. Whenever Astra picks up something (a sock, a computer cord, a tissue...) I call her name, pick up something else she can have, and the second she spits out whatever she has to get whatever I've got, I'll praise her good "drop it" so she understands after a few times of me saying "drop it" right after she has spit out or dropped an item that that word means release whatever she is holding.
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» There has since been 2 posts. Last posting by Samson, Oct 9 4:40 pm

Service & Therapy Dogs > New here...
Astra

Super Star
 
 
Barked: Mon Oct 7, '13 9:00am PST 
Hi Diesel, welcome to Dogster and the SD community. There is a saying around here, "Slow is fast." Meaning the slower you take things the more likely your dog and you will succeed as a team. You are absolutely right about burnout with younger dogs, but that is generally the people who take their dogs into public places (where dogs aren't allowed) and expect them to behave in a SD capacity long before they are ready.

If your dog potties in Petsmart or sniffs the items, no big deal, they are learning. But if that happens in Walmart it not only reflects poorly on you and your dog as a team, but on the next SD team that comes after.

Take more frequent training sessions (no more than 10 minutes) over longer training sessions where your dog may lose interest. There is not a dog too young to start learning. People have trained the basics on just weeks old pups. But I would definitely suggest waiting until your dog has some solid behaviors under his belt before taking him out into a public venue for the first time (sit, down, wait, come, loose leash walking, watch me, leave it) so that way you can instruct him using language he knows as to what to do.

Once you do enter stores for public access training, make sure the first couple of times are no longer than 3-10 minutes. I suggest going into a local convenience store and purchasing a candy bar or something, and then leaving. Once you leave, HUGE praise. Make sure this is fun for him. Slowly build up to longer trips out. As his confidence and skill grows, you can make trips longer.

Good luck! smile
-Ariel and Astra
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» There has since been 0 posts. Last posting by , Oct 7 9:00 am


Service & Therapy Dogs > Best responses for "WHATISTHAT?!CANIPET?!OHMYGODWHEREDOIGETONE?!"

Astra

Super Star
 
 
Barked: Thu Oct 3, '13 11:10pm PST 
Astra is my 15 week old Silken Windhound pup. She is my SD prospect, but will begin learning the basics soon.

Since I've had her home a simple walk down the street results in many heads turned and even more questions. I can only imagine what it will be like when she is grown up and in full coat.

For those of you with rare, uncommon, or unusual SD breeds how do you handle the constant barrage of interest in knowing about your dog, your dog's breed, and where they can get their very own dog "just like that"?
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» There has since been 13 posts. Last posting by Diesel, Oct 20 7:04 am


Puppy Place > Introducing Astra the Silken Windhound pup!

Astra

Super Star
 
 
Barked: Thu Oct 3, '13 11:04pm PST 
Astra is my 15 week old Silken Windhound puppy. She is phenomenal in temperament and is soon to start her training to be my service dog.
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» There has since been 6 posts. Last posting by Bianca CGC TT HIC Thd ♥, Oct 6 12:19 pm


Service & Therapy Dogs > Reliable Patch Venders?

Echo

Super Service- Dog!
 
 
Barked: Tue Jul 16, '13 10:44pm PST 
Do NOT use servicedoghouse.com. They are scammers and don't ever send merchandise!
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» There has since been 6 posts. Last posting by Laverne Marie, Jul 28 6:11 pm

Service & Therapy Dogs > Laughing Eyes Kennels
Echo

Super Service- Dog!
 
 
Barked: Sat Jul 6, '13 4:37am PST 
I don't have any positive suggestions, but I'd stay away from Heeling Allies, as I have a friend who was burned pretty badly by them and another who has a dog that needed to wash out because he was an inappropriate candidate for service work.
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» There has since been 4 posts. Last posting by Iris vom Zauberberg, Aug 5 2:40 pm

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