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Border Collie > Border Collie Aggression/biting


Member Since
04/14/2012
 
 
Barked: Thu Jan 10, '13 1:34am PST 
Our first BC didnt like kids then we had 2

!She never hurt either as we did not let them get close enough to her to have any accidents.She did nip a boy at a party as he was throwing a ball for her and held it into his body so she jumped to grab it and nipped some flesh!
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» There has since been 2 posts. Last posting by , Jun 25 3:50 pm

Behavior & Training > Hyperactive GSD


Member Since
04/14/2012
 
 
Barked: Thu Jan 10, '13 1:24am PST 
Our dog is a rescue - he was shut up in a house in town for 9 hours a day then only on lead walks -basically a very damaged dog when we got him at 2 and a half - we soon found out he would bite if he was touched in a way he was nervous of and would run away if he heard shots !!

If we had not taken him he would have been put down. Homes here do not take dogs that bite -end of.He now has a country home with big garden ,walks and play.

He is our 4th BC -we started 35 yrs ago so we do know a bit about them!

If you really want to know what experts say about BCs lok at the brilliant Border Collie Trust website - it may give a more balanced view.
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» There has since been -1 posts. Last posting by Sadie, Jan 10 8:39 pm


Behavior & Training > Hyperactive GSD



Member Since
04/14/2012
 
 
Barked: Thu Jan 10, '13 1:16am PST 
Are most of you in the US? In the UK there is lots of importance placed on diet and nutrition and when we changed our dog's diet we noticed a big change; maybe there is less emphasis on these factors in the US??? Lots of dog trainers use

Our dog gets plenty of exercise and he is very calm for a BC.Just nervous bout certain noises and other things.

How many of you take evening primrose for pmt?? Vitamins and food supplements can make a big difference to a dog's behaviour ONCE other issues have been resolved.If you turn your back on them totally you are really doing your dog a disservice.
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» There has since been 0 posts. Last posting by Sadie, Jan 10 8:39 pm


Behavior & Training > Hyperactive GSD



Member Since
04/14/2012
 
 
Barked: Mon Jan 7, '13 1:42am PST 
Ok -the calm-ezze are food additives like vitamins not drugs! Total over reaction here!!!

The dogs in Italy are not pups -they were dumped outside in a box in 2009 outside our house in Italy .Has anyone here dealt with the Italian authorities when it comes to caring for strays? If they have please do tell me all about your successful attempts to re-home strays there!

Basically the local council is responsible but its the Police there that have to send a fax to the public vets who then do nothing so you have to drive to their office and help them uncover this fax in a pile of paperwork then if you are lucky they may collect a female dog spay her and return her to your garden! Now due to the economic situation in Italy they are not even doing this. Local dogs homes are full to bursting and are more like prisons than dogs homes.

These dogs are a constant worry to me and it is very lucky that a local lady does feed them as we are living mainly in the UK. What is possible in the US or UK isn't in Italy and you do need to be there to really understand.

As I said before I am certainly not an expert but I just wanted to pass on some info regarding the calm-ezze as we have found them helpful and I thought the GSD owner might too?

I'm sure everything thats been written about exercise etc comes from dog owner's experience of what works for them but I do feel concerned that we do over stimulate pets and our children by constantly 'stimulating' with toys and activities and never letting them be still and calm-not bored but calm and happy in their own skins! That's all I was trying to say.
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» There has since been 4 posts. Last posting by Sadie, Jan 10 8:39 pm


Behavior & Training > Hyperactive GSD



Member Since
04/14/2012
 
 
Barked: Thu Jan 3, '13 1:48am PST 
A couple of thoughts from a complete novice and not a trainer!

As owners of a very hyper breed, a Border Collie we have found a tablet called Calm-eez very effective these can be found on Amazon at about £4 a pack.Totally natural.

I always feel that the border collies we've had could have done with more exercise (ours get about 2 hrs off lead a day and garden games) but then some very unpleasant person left a box with 2 puppies outside the house we own in Italy.We are not there often and were relieved when a kind neighbor said she would feed them but they live an otherwise' wild' life.I managed to get the council to spay the girl and they did this then released her to our garden!The 2 dogs are friendly to us and the girl particularly loves me to make a fuss of her but neither want to come inside or to get too close. Watching their behaviour makes me think that its very natural for a dog to be sleeping and relaxed for much of the day especailly when they have eaten.Thse dogs do g off in the evening and will have a mad 20 mins chasing and playing but most of the time they just chill It makes me think its our homes and lifestyles that make dogs hyper rather than the dogs themselves.

I know if I got up at 5.30am and my dog got so much human attention he'd be terrible.He would just get to expect more and more attention ( I'm including walks as attention ) .Do dogs really need 4 hours of walking a day to be happy?Left to their own devices I dont see any evidence that they feel it necessary to exercise that much unless its in the search of food or a female in season!
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» There has since been 19 posts. Last posting by Sadie, Jan 10 8:39 pm

Behavior & Training > last chance


Member Since
04/14/2012
 
 
Barked: Tue Nov 13, '12 11:47am PST 
I'm so heartened! Thanks.

He loves me stroking his tummy and I always tickle him under his legs and stroke his paws while he lays on his back which he loves! So wierd how in a relaxed playful state he can love something but when he is tense he hates it.

Another thing I thought is that when my partner takes him out in the afternoon he is always very hungry and he knows that once he has been dried off he'll get his supper so that makes him more impatient. Hence more snappy.

flowers
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» There has since been 0 posts. Last posting by , Nov 13 11:47 am


Behavior & Training > last chance



Member Since
04/14/2012
 
 
Barked: Tue Nov 13, '12 8:27am PST 
Thanks we have been so upset and just feel downhearted because I personally feel that I trust this dog and he only bit because he hated what was being done to him.He can just about tolerate it if I do it but as you say collar grabs and clipping on the lead are also flashpoints.

I do have a behaviourist who advocates muzzle training then getting him handled to the point where he would bite but cant because of the muzzle.We have been warned this is a difficult process! Our main problem would be getting the muzzle onto him but I know it can be done.
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» There has since been 6 posts. Last posting by , Nov 13 11:47 am


Behavior & Training > last chance



Member Since
04/14/2012
 
 
Barked: Tue Nov 13, '12 4:50am PST 
our rescue border collie has bitten my partner 3 times always when he was closely handling him. The problem is he is very fearful and hates certain close handling.He never growls just bites.At the time my partner didnt distract him with a treat which is what I do he just dried his paws.

He snaps and shows teeth at me and our daughter from time to time when we try to remove a tick or tighten his collar.This is very short lived and we can distract him easily .Other wise he shows no signs of aggression and is very good with other dogs and people on walks.He is calm and good in the car and home unless he hears guns or fireworks which he hates.

Our dog trainer thinks he is dangerous now and he may have to be put to sleep,we could try medication and training with him wearing a muzzle but she thinks the failure rate will be high.

He gets lots of exercise but doesn't go to classes as he found them too overwhelming.

My daughter and I love him and can't stand the thought of him being put to sleep.

Has any one managed to get over this type of snappy panic biting and if so how?

He has been with us 8 months and is 3 years.
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» There has since been 9 posts. Last posting by , Nov 13 11:47 am


Behavior & Training > a nervous dog



Member Since
04/14/2012
 
 
Barked: Tue Jun 26, '12 7:34am PST 
Jock our border collie of 2.5 years (3 months with us now) is almost as bad! He hates loud noises,windowscreen wipers,men,hoovers etc etc! We never thought taking on a rescue dog would be so hard.

He has several 'safe spots upstairs and I agree with what has been said about these.

I am working on building up his confidence and have already 'taught' him several words such as treat,walk,bird,stick,ball etc.I've also tried him with frisbee and ball games and he loves these.I'm now concentrating on getting him to 'leave' on command.

Unfortunately he has a rocky relationship with my partner and doesnt obey him regularly and has bitten him twice.These dogs really do need lots of patience and encouragement to relax more.

Has anyone tried any herbal remedies etc to help ?
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» There has since been 5 posts. Last posting by Cain, Jun 27 8:31 am

Behavior & Training > Jock hates collars


Member Since
04/14/2012
 
 
Barked: Sun Jun 10, '12 3:55am PST 
We've had Jock, a 3 year old Border Collie for 2 months now and he is getting on fine although he is still a very nervous lad.

The one thing that we haven't been able to make much progress on is taking off his collar.When we first had him he bit my partner and snapped at both me and my daughter when we held his collar.We can now hold his collar with no problems but as soon as we try to undo the catch he snaps (not biting) so we stop.

My daughter bought him a new collar but when he saw it he went mad, snarling and snapping so she had to hide it!

We think he may have been badly treated and possibly they used an electric shock collar on him as he does have a habit of trying to escape.

The question is when do we try again to remove his collar? Shall we leave it a few more months but keep touching it as much as possible to desensitise him or do we just take it off and hope he wont bite us?
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» There has since been 1 post. Last posting by , Jun 10 7:02 am

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