Postings by Tyson's Family

GO!

(Page 1 of 2: Viewing entries 1 to 10)  
Page Links: 1  2  

Sports & Agility > Building NADAC Hoops?
Bonnie

I KNOW what I'm- doing!
 
 
Barked: Tue Apr 5, '11 12:49pm PST 
How about buying hula hoops? You could cut them in half and attach them to a PVC base or just pound stakes in the ground for them. I recently made some little hoops for contact training and I just used long metal stakes and jammed them into a cut length of garden hose. Quick and cheap and works. But if you need them big enough for NADAC might be better using something sturdier like the hula hoops. Or else make the whole thing out of PVC? Just throwing out some ideas.
[notify]
» There has since been 3 posts. Last posting by Maggie NAC WV-N TN-N CTL-3 RE , May 4 12:01 am

Sports & Agility > Cna I train both a left AND right heal?
Bonnie

I KNOW what I'm- doing!
 
 
Barked: Wed Mar 16, '11 3:12pm PST 
Maybe this will give you some ideas:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dUmHNOpGrjE
http://www.youtu be.com/watch?v=rk4DW0u3vKc&feature=related
http://www.youtube.com/w atch?v=Jdwk3st643s&feature=related
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=J uf8SzlPufo
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mofbjQ2Z3vc

You could also look at getting some DVDs. I've seen Greg Derrett's Foundation dvd and thought it was just ok. But there are lots of other out there that I haven't seen yet. Maybe try Rachael Sander's PreSports Puppy. There is also a set by Mary Ellen Barry that might be good.

The problem with starting out with a 'we're just doing this for fun, we don't want to compete' attitude is that after you've been training for a while and you see how crazy fun it is and how good your dog is doing, you'll want to compete! And then you might have to go back and fix bad habits you created in the beginning. So I always think it is best to instill good habits and strong behaviors right from the beginning. It doesn't make it any less fun! And then you'll have a great foundation if you decide later to trial.
[notify]
» There has since been 1 post. Last posting by Paisley, Mar 16 3:19 pm


Sports & Agility > Cna I train both a left AND right heal?

Bonnie

I KNOW what I'm- doing!
 
 
Barked: Wed Mar 16, '11 12:31pm PST 
Sounds like she's going to be an amazing agility partner! smile
Good luck with her and have fun!
[notify]
» There has since been 4 posts. Last posting by Paisley, Mar 16 3:19 pm


Sports & Agility > Private agility lesson

Bonnie

I KNOW what I'm- doing!
 
 
Barked: Wed Mar 16, '11 12:17pm PST 
Awesomeness!! Have fun! blue dog Let us know how it goes.
[notify]
» There has since been 0 posts. Last posting by Bonnie, Mar 16 12:17 pm


Sports & Agility > Fur tug toy recommendations?

Bonnie

I KNOW what I'm- doing!
 
 
Barked: Wed Mar 16, '11 12:14pm PST 
Practice your tugging in quiet settings for now so she can stay focused. I've found for highly food motivated dogs, even if they like tugging they may refuse to tug if they think there is a possibility of food instead. So maybe start your training session with just the toy, then end it with food, instead of going back and forth. Once she has more drive built up for tugging you can start to increase her tolerance for switching back and forth. If the presence of food doesn't throw her off you can use click/treats to reward her tugging. She mouths the toy=C/T. She grips the toy=C/T. She pulls on the toy= C/T and so on, until she tugging enthusiastically. Eventually the tugging will become more motivating to her.

For toys I usually keep it simple. Bonnie loves tugging but has a weak grip and so doesn't like big firm toys or hard materials like fire hose. I use knotted socks or rope tugs the most, because they are very easy for her to grip. They throw ok. Cheap and disposable. Some tugs come with a squeaker, maybe she would find that motivating? Fleece tugs may work well. Bonnie hated the feel of fur in her mouth, fake fur tugs were no good for her. If she likes balls, try threading a rope through a tennis ball and using that for tugging. A lot of dogs really like leather tugs, it feels good to bite I guess. How about trying a Moo Tube? I've seen them sold under various names but it is a black rubber tube, used for dairy operations. Some dogs just go crazy for these. Frisbees can work as tug toys as well, especially those Chuck It Flying Squirrels, if your dog enjoys frisbees.

For drive building, try attaching the toy to the end of a horse lunge whip. The movement will drive dogs crazy, especially dogs with that prey drive/herding instinct.

Lastly, you can get a stuffable toy, or just put food into a sock or bait bag. Maybe this will help your dog enjoy tugging, but even if it doesn't, you can still throw the food in it as an agility reward, then run out with your dog and feed them from the toy. Great way to use food for teaching distance.
[notify]
» There has since been 3 posts. Last posting by Lucky, NTD, Mar 21 2:04 pm

Sports & Agility > Cna I train both a left AND right heal?
Bonnie

I KNOW what I'm- doing!
 
 
Barked: Wed Mar 16, '11 11:56am PST 
Common problem with taking a dog with a strong obedience foundation into agility. Not the worst problem you could have!! LOL!

Sounds like what you have is a dog with too much handler focus. This will change as you continue the training and the obstacles start to have a lot of value to her. Obstacles = chance to earn reinforcement. She'll start looking for obstacles to perform. Eventually the value transfers to the point that just doing the obstacles is super reinforcing. You want her to be focused on the obstacles, at the job at hand. You also need her to focus on you a little, so she can see your commands and you can run the course as a team.

Too much obstacle focus will look like a dog out of control, ignoring the handler's body language, making up its own course, running to the next obvious obstacle regardless of what the handler does.
Too much handler focus will be pretty slow because the dog is trying to match pace with you, the dog is turned in toward you instead of looking for the next obstacle. The dog may skip jumps because they were looking at you and didn't even notice them.

A good agility team will have a good balance between obstacle and handler focus. The dog is looking ahead, looking for obstacles, but also responsive to direction. This is something you will always be working on, balancing the value of the obstacles and yourself.

That you can keep her attention around other dogs and handlers and the whole agility environment is GREAT!! That's a lot more than most people can say when they first start. Good job! applause Now instead of clicking so much for looking at you, you can start clicking her for looking at the obstacles and for moving away from you to them. Just as you built lots of value for her coming to your left side for heeling or for attention, now you will be building value for moving through a jump, or tunnel, etc...
[notify]
» There has since been 6 posts. Last posting by Paisley, Mar 16 3:19 pm


Sports & Agility > Cna I train both a left AND right heal?

Bonnie

I KNOW what I'm- doing!
 
 
Barked: Wed Mar 16, '11 11:22am PST 
Congrats on getting started in agility! It is SO fun and addictive. big grin

Ok, heel and side should mean 'line up next to my body'. This is great for positioning your dog at the startline (when you are eventually doing sequences) but when you are running a course, you do NOT want the dog right next to you. You will start training with her close to you just from necessity, but you will try to develop her confidence at working at a distance from you, driving forward to obstacles etc.. Because she can run much faster than you can, you don't want to hold her back to your pace!

So what I'm saying is, keep using your 'free' command to release her. Your body language and positioning on course will tell her to keep running with you. No need to add 'heel' or 'side' since you don't want her running into heel position next to you, she should be running to the next obstacle. Make sense?
[notify]
» There has since been 8 posts. Last posting by Paisley, Mar 16 3:19 pm


Sports & Agility > Cna I train both a left AND right heal?

Bonnie

I KNOW what I'm- doing!
 
 
Barked: Wed Mar 16, '11 10:45am PST 
Yes, train both sides. She simply has more value for your left side right now because of all your prior heel training. Start putting some more value into your right side. I use the command 'side'. You won't lose the work you've done already. Does training 'down' ruin your 'sit'? wink Just practice both and make sure both have value and she understands the cue words.

I practice alternating between 'close' and 'side' (left and right heels) and relaxed loose leash walking on every walk. Also when setting up for sequences I work both sides. It is a very important skill to have. Certainly doesn't need to be (and probably shouldn't be) a formal attention heel. But you do need to get the dog comfy on both sides. Practice running in big circles, keeping the dog on the outside. Do both directions.
[notify]
» There has since been 10 posts. Last posting by Paisley, Mar 16 3:19 pm


Behavior & Training > Alternatives to teach "spin"?

Bonnie

I KNOW what I'm- doing!
 
 
Barked: Wed Mar 16, '11 10:35am PST 
I originally taught Bonnie to 'spin' and 'twist' with a food lure, but it wasn't a very strong behavior and I had a lot of trouble fading my great big hand signal. I retaught it recently using a toy and the difference in her performance is enormous. Here's how we did it.

Start a fun energetic game of tug with the dog. While the dog is happily tugging, use the toy to spin them in a quick circle (dog still attached). Practice both directions. Keep the fun energy up. When the dog is comfy with that and turning easily, add the commands (I used left and right) while you spin the dog. Next, have the dog out the toy, then quickly spin the toy like you were doing and say the command. The dog already has the memory of this so should spin around very fast and happily. Allow them to grab the toy as they come around and continue tugging. Repeat, repeat, repeat. Always say the command first. Gradually minimize the hand motion required. Work up to having the dog do several spins or twists or both before earning the tug back. You can practice with the dog at your side or facing away from you as well.

This training gave Bonnie a strong understanding of the game and she performs super fast motivated spins. Works well for a toy motivated dog. Hope this helps. smile
[notify]
» There has since been 4 posts. Last posting by , Mar 16 3:47 pm

Akita > The color of an Akita
By-Tor

949652
 
 
Barked: Sat Apr 3, '10 4:57pm PST 
By-Tor is black with light grey undercoat and has the white markings on chest and paws, though his markings are fairly minimal to the white 'tuxes' on some dogs I've seen. When he is in full coat the grey undercoat shows through as brindling, especially on his hindquarters, but most of the time he just looks plain black. My favorite Akita color is the full silver/black brindle. Sooo pretty!

Long coats do show up in purebred Akita litters, though I don't think they are correct for the show ring (correct me if I'm wrong). The coat is very long and fluffy, they look like a teddy bear! The long coats I've petted were incredibly soft. Too much coat for me though...
[notify]
» There has since been 2 posts. Last posting by Chakra ~in loving memory~, Apr 7 5:07 pm

(Page 1 of 2: Viewing entries 1 to 10)  
Page Links: 1  2  

PLEASE NOTE: Due to the rapid nature of forum postings, it's quite possible our calculation of the number of ensuing forum posts may be off by one or two or more at any given moment.