Postings by Alucard's Family

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Behavior & Training > Help with finding websites about dog bite statistics, etc.
Buddy

Everybudy's- Buddy!
 
 
Barked: Sat Feb 6, '10 8:29am PST 
Oh, and Ash, that statement was just about the dogs I have personally had or lived around. The examples I was think of were when my min pin bit my mom in the face because she was teasing him while he had a pig's ear, and Jack, my mom's mutt nipped a baby in the face when he had a bone. Both entirly the fault of the humans involved (not the baby, of course). Neither time was anyone really hurt, (the baby mostly got bumped by his nose more than bitten, she was perfectly fine, and of course they never leave her alone with the dogs, but it only takes a second, even if you're watching).

Once Quincy bit me when his paw was stuck and he was in a lot of pain, and I was just hurting him more getting it loose, but again, not his fault, he was only a puppy and being hurt. But that's the only other incident where any of the dogs I have known well have bitten.

So, in my life, two times out of three dogs have bitten when guarding a chew item. That's what I was getting at.
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» There has since been 2 posts. Last posting by Daddy, Feb 6 9:42 am

Behavior & Training > Help with finding websites about dog bite statistics, etc.
Buddy

Everybudy's- Buddy!
 
 
Barked: Sat Feb 6, '10 8:20am PST 
Thanks so much everyone. Just about anything and everything is helpful, I can filther through it myself and take out things I need. I am only required to use three sources, but so far all of mine say "oh, these same ten dogs are most likely to bite, based on.... no evidence" They just list the breeds. One had which breeds are most likely to kill, and ranked pit bulls top only because of their sheer strength, ability, and the fact that their tendancy is to keep going for quite a while. It also didn't say they were most likely to kill humans, it was anything they choose to attack. Which I guess makes sense.

I know that statistics are based on only reported cases, it's impossible to tell how many and what breed of dogs live in a given area, and how many people were lying or misinformed when they said "this breed bit me" ? But I can't just say things like that, I need some kind of evidence to back it up.

Thanks again, these links all look like things I could use.
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» There has since been 3 posts. Last posting by Daddy, Feb 6 9:42 am


Behavior & Training > Help with finding websites about dog bite statistics, etc.

Buddy

Everybudy's- Buddy!
 
 
Barked: Fri Feb 5, '10 4:22pm PST 
I've seen a few before, but now I am doing a speech for my college on dog bites. This is my basic thesis:
All dogs can bite, so I would like to illustrate how to avoid being bitten by any and all dogs, as well as which breeds are most likely to bite and when.

In my experience, small dogs bite the most, but the bites aren't reported, so it makes it hard to find real statistics. I mean, little Bobby's mom isn't going to report when his grandma's yorkie goes nuts on him, but when the neighbor's pit bull growls and snaps at someone while they are walking, they usually report it. I understand it's because of the difference in the damage that can be done, but truth is all a dog as to do is hit the right spot and most any dog bite can be awful, even fatal.

I have also seen that usually if a dog bites, its when they are guarding a resource from someone other than their "pack" but I also have yet to find any good sites explaining this.

Any personal experiences (with a first names and state of residence of the people involved) that you will not mind me mentioning in my speech would be appreciated too.

Thanks so much!
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» There has since been 9 posts. Last posting by Daddy, Feb 6 9:42 am


Dog Health > Black Spots?

Quincy

I'll stop the- escape of that- wily ball!
 
 
Barked: Tue Jan 12, '10 11:35am PST 
Today when the Big Reds were in the house, I noticed Quincy had some black spots on his lower belly on and around his boy parts. They look like someone took a marker and dotted him with it, are about as big around as a crayola marker tip, but are all different sizes and shapes. Very smooth, no hair on them, not bumpy or funny in any way other than the fact that they are black and his skin is normally all pinkish there.
His kennel mate and half brother Alucard has one spot on his belly, and my indoor dog Taji has nothing.

I looked it up online and they said in their area they had a fungus that caused that, but it didn't say where the posters were from. I'm near the MN state capital but out in the country. The Big Reds live outside in a kennel connected to a big doghouse where they have hay/straw bedding. It's been this way for years, but we do buy fresh bedding every year.

Has anyone else ever heard of this, know what it is, and whether or not I need to get them into the vet? I plan to watch them both closely this week and if it gets any worse get on the phone with my vet asap, not going to try putting anything on it.
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» There has since been 1 post. Last posting by Boots, Jan 12 1:35 pm


Irish Setter > Advice on the Irish Setter breed

Alucard

Master Of Escape
 
 
Barked: Wed Oct 28, '09 6:13pm PST 
Irish Setters are, very often, puppies for life. They are hunting dogs so they have a pretty good prey-drive, love to learn new things, are very smart, easy to train BUT you must KEEP AT IT forever. I have two Irish Setters and they are smart as can be, they still remember tricks I taught them when they were puppies (one called "ferret" where they gently put both paws on my tummy, which I haven't had them perform for years). The problem is they are VERY HIGH ENERGY and need to have something to burn this off, then something to focus their brains on.

Hunting with them is a good idea, I have one (Alucard) who is a born and bred hunter, and sadly we don't hunt, so he brings things home for us. Game birds, small animals, always alive and usually they are fine, I bring them to a rehab center and they are released when deemed healthy.

If you are looking to get one, do your research on them and try to get one from a rescue if you can, www.petfinder.com is a great one. We are considering rehoming Alucard because we know how much happier he would be with a hunting family, but only to just the right people. He is our baby, after all.

Also remember, there is a difference between the "Bench" variety and the "field" variety, both in temper and in look. They are almost two different breeds. The field dogs, like we have, are just what their name implies, field or common dogs. Bench dogs are basically show dogs, longer fur, deeper color, larger frame, mellower attitude, higher price, usually. I don't know as much about bench dogs as I do our field boys aside from what they look like. I've never met one.

Hope that helps, and if you don't mind let me know why you're asking. I can give you more specific information if you ask specific questions, as like I said I have two and my mum has had them for years.
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» There has since been 0 posts. Last posting by Alucard, Oct 28 6:13 pm

Behavior & Training > So this dog ripped Laila's collar during a fight... Little Rant...
Alucard

Master Of Escape
 
 
Barked: Wed Oct 28, '09 5:56pm PST 
O_o If you know something makes your dog agressive.... why would you do it in a public location where your VERY LARGE dog could possibly hurt/kill someone's innocent dog? Call me spiteful but if it were me and I ever saw her again I would let her know all about the collar and how glad I was that it hadn't been my dog's neck. But that's just me, I try to be forgiving but... not always.
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» There has since been 26 posts. Last posting by Holly, Oct 29 6:29 pm


Behavior & Training > Aggression When Awakened

Natajh Mahal- (Taji)

Tough as- nails... if mom- is holding me
 
 
Barked: Wed Oct 28, '09 5:30pm PST 
Wow! Never thought I'd see this, but my min pin Taji does the exact same thing. He has since he was fairly young, he growls and groans when I pick him up to bring him to bed and WILL NOT get up if I just make noise or call him. I have always just ignored it and picked him up anyway, he doesn't bite he just complains and tosses his head around. Actually he's improved a lot, but I find when other people try to do it and they hesitate he will snarl more and snap a little. As long as I'm calm and confidant and just let him know he's getting picked up now he better hush, he's pretty darn good.

I'm just surprised I found someone else whose min pin does that, I thought Taji was just a grumbler. He "talks" a lot, so yeah.
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» There has since been 1 post. Last posting by Angel, Oct 28 10:43 pm


Behavior & Training > fear or motion sick?

Buddy

Everybudy's- Buddy!
 
 
Barked: Sun Oct 25, '09 7:47pm PST 
Ginger and dramomine (totally spelled that wrong, sorry) are really helpful in my experience, Buddy gets vicous motion-sickness in the car and he is an adult now so it isn't due to youth. Quincy used to get car sick but he got over it, many dogs do. Dramomine puts Buddy to sleep so we can take rides that last hours with no problems, and once he gets up and moving again he wakes right up. Another thing that helps him is when I drive with him in my little Saturn Ion, I put my back seat down and put him in the trunk (sort of) so he can't see outside and get disoriented. It's very cave/kennel like and he really is a lot more comfortable that way, though he's a calm adult now not an energetic puppy.
Best wishes!
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» There has since been 2 posts. Last posting by Kahuna, Oct 26 1:09 pm


Behavior & Training > Killer Min Pin

Natajh Mahal- (Taji)

Tough as- nails... if mom- is holding me
 
 
Barked: Mon Oct 19, '09 6:04pm PST 
Hey, thanks everyone for the help you've offered, sorry I haven't been around to reply till now.
Living situation is this: I'm a college student living at home, brother is 11, and I can't leave because I can't afford to. They're all stubborn, my dad's answer was "get rid of all the dogs in 5 days or I shoot them" (not serious of course, just angry) my brother basically told me to fly a kite, even when I told him I would have to put the dog to sleep if he ever bit anyone. Mum told me I was overreacting, and my uncle (who lives with us) did nothing.
So, that's why I can't get family support, I really honestly can't. Sorry to say we aren't a "family meeting" sort of group. And since mum and dad don't like Taji, they would soon see me get rid of him, which I just can't. If we overcame his desire to eat my pet mouse, we can do anything.

More basic info:
Generally I try to keep Taji with me 24/7, and he likes it that way, he's very mommy-oriented. This helps a lot, however I can't bring him to campus or work, obviously, and there are times I am busy and he has to stay home or I am not paying total attention to him when I am home.

Now, everyone has their own opinions on everything, and I don't mean to dismiss anyone here, but I think there is a difference between a play-bite and a real bite WITH SPECIFIC PEOPLE. In court, a bite is a bite, no matter what, end of story, which is the reason I'm here. However, with Taji, if he "bites" me (when he is angry, not playing) it's a fake-out, he hardly touches me at all and usually does it with a closed or only partially open mouth. This is how he reacts to adults bothering him, he whips his head about and hits them with his muzzle (mouth closed), or just squirms and tries to get away.

He has NEVER (yet) actually even tried to play-bite anyone besides family, but he does mouth at hands when playing sometimes, very very gently. Usually a puppet is used instead of a bare hand, and he knows he is allowed to bite a toy, and you can tell the difference between when you have a puppet and when you don't.

It's the situation of chasing that worries me a lot because I know how quickly it can move beyond just a chase, and while I don't think the is the biting kind at all, it frightens children a lot and the possibility is without doubt there that he could bite.


A couple of things that speaks really good for him though, are first, the fact that he has been tormented a lot by babies and itty bitty children, and he ALWAYS does nothing more than scoot away if he doesn't like something. They've gone so far as to grab his ears, and he just shook his head a little. He loves babies, and lets my friend's daughter drag him around on his leash and hug him and do all sorts of things, and has never even made me think he might possibly nip.
Of course he's always VERY CLOSELY WATCHED when around any young people. It's just kids who are able to run that spark the unwanted behavior, especially boys.

Second, Zac has to really bother him to get him to chase when I'm around, he teases and pesters him (no matter how many times I tell him to knock it off) until Taji leaps, then it's constant for an hour or more sometimes. I know I could just pick him up and bring him to another room, but will that really help deter/stop him from chasing? I keep him on a leash most of the time, or held close in my lap so he can't jump away, but when I'm not home, I can't really do anything.

No one thinks maybe doing something like bringing him to a public playground where kids are running, keeping him on a leash so he can't chase, and re-directing his attention might help?
We are for sure going to at least try firming up basic obedience, especially "come" and "no"
Zac has yet to chase with him that I've seen since my first post, but being an 11 year old, who knows how long that will last.


In direct response to a couple of comments:
Trigger, the chasing is a fairly recent development in his behavior, just within the past year, and a lot of it has been done behind my back. I understand he, like every other dog, has a prey drive, but toys were his focus until Zac started this habit up. But I think your idea of solidifying basic commands will help a lot, especially outside the home environment.

Fynnigan, true as that may be, it's a very general statement. I already mentioned how he is with babies, but you're right, there are things he will not tolerate which need to be avoided. He won't allow himself to be picked up except by specific people, no matter how hard I've worked on changing this. Oh and babies, he will let any baby he's ever met do anything to him.

Luna, I think you and I think a lot alike. All dogs are different, and my dog is really a unique little thing. I also think he is probably able to understand "bite inhibition" pretty darn well, as I explained with the puppet vs bare hand thing.

Fritz, thanks for the well-wishes, but I don't think any of those ideas specifically would work well in my situation. Despite being an adult, I am not a figure of dominance in the house. I can't move out, as mentioned, and I can't part with Taji, nor do I think he would even do well in a new home. He's VERY picky about people, and still will sit in his kennel and bark at people who come visit all the time. Shoving him into a situation with a whole new family would, I think, traumatize him pretty hard.

Thanks again everyone! I really appreciate the feedback.
Taji says 'woof row-row'
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» There has since been 0 posts. Last posting by Natajh Mahal (Taji), Oct 19 6:04 pm

Behavior & Training > She cries/whines at the vet
Quincy

I'll stop the- escape of that- wily ball!
 
 
Barked: Tue Oct 13, '09 5:24pm PST 
I can't offer much in the way of help, but I can say you're not alone. Quincy and Al, my Irish Setter brothers, both have issues at the vet. A little while ago I brought Al in by himself and he was really uncomfortable, usually he's happy as a clam and has never even flinched when he got his shots, not once. That time though he was so freaked out he wouldn't leave the lobby for the private room, I had to carry him in, and then he kept crouching by the doors and wouldn't let himself be examined properly. Every other time he's been sweet as suger.

Quincy on the other hand is the biggest baby ever. He almost went out a (closed) window once just SEEING the needle, like a person with phobia. He screams and cries like you're killing him when he gets a shot, and slams on the breaks, plants all four feet, and will NOT move if we walk towards the private rooms. He ALWAYS has to be carried, and he's never had what I would think of as a truly bad experience at the vet, just normal visits.

Hope it helps to know you're not alone, and if I ever find any "cure" (pun intended) for the behavior I will not hesitate to share it with you. Good luck!
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» There has since been 4 posts. Last posting by Tally, Oct 13 9:49 pm

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