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Dog Health > running around like she saw a ghost?
Charlie- Brown Cocoa- Puffs

1275296
 
 
Barked: Sun Apr 28, '13 4:45am PST 
i agree with fritz. it could even b something as simple as mice. i have seen behavior similar to this. it involved a pup and pack rats. which are much bigger and more of a threat. however, if you have ever heard mice scurrying through your walls its kinda scary. it could b a million things though. if you pay close attention to ur dog you may figure it out one day.
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» There has since been 1 post. Last posting by , Apr 28 3:16 pm

Behavior & Training > How to show your dog who's boss . . . . sigh . . ..
Charlie- Brown Cocoa- Puffs

1275296
 
 
Barked: Sun Apr 28, '13 4:35am PST 
tabasco sauce? really?!! wow talk about going back to old school training methods that don't work. i had to stop reading this article. it's like all the dumb training methods anyone has ever used or thought of (some i hadn't even heard of b4) all rolled into one article. the bad thing though. there are probably thousands of people out there attempting to train their dogs themselves that are using these methods now. just like with the tv shows they watch on training. even when there is good advice online, tv, etc it is all a product of ones interpretation of the information they are seeing. i hope this article gets banned, deleted or something to save alot of dogs and actual trainers the problems to come from these methods.
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» There has since been 7 posts. Last posting by , Apr 29 11:15 am


Behavior & Training > How to show your dog who's boss . . . . sigh . . ..

Charlie- Brown Cocoa- Puffs

1275296
 
 
Barked: Sun Apr 28, '13 4:07am PST 
wow...this is so silly i think i have to read the article. i need a laugh this morning
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» There has since been 8 posts. Last posting by , Apr 29 11:15 am


Choosing the Right Dog > Food aggression issues in desired dog at shelter. Is it too risky to work with?

Charlie- Brown Cocoa- Puffs

1275296
 
 
Barked: Mon Jan 7, '13 3:30am PST 
i just wanted to add a lil bit. this is a good discussion. you definately want to keep your head on your shoulders and look at all the variables in the situation before you decide to take this dog home or not. However, even dogs with extreme issues can be rehabilitated and/or managed. who knows, you may never be able to feed the dogs together but thats what they make other rooms and baby gates for. easily managed if it can't be fixed. One of my best dogs was on her way to being euthanized. she was a GSD with extreme fear aggression that was about to get her labeled vicious. Her biggest issue though besides having been extremely abused was the people that handled her. GSD's can have a tendency to be pretty bi-polar at times, lol. however, usually that has alot of human influence . In the end with my rescue dog she went everywhere with me. guarded my clients. escorted my limo customers. so she had a complete turn around from mostly being around the right people, consistent training and a good home. so can yours also. good luck
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» There has since been 5 posts. Last posting by , Jan 18 1:22 pm


Behavior & Training > Dealing With Bone Aggression

Charlie- Brown Cocoa- Puffs

1275296
 
 
Barked: Sun Jan 6, '13 7:55am PST 
ok so i'm gonna rant here a lil. so im gonna appologize right now for not positively reinforcing someones method. first off i'll tell you i've worked with resource guarders, tons of them. i know what works and its alot simpiler then these wishy washy methods people use. simply put. the dog is a dog. you are the human. as far as not getting in the dogs space (oh im gonna get some hate mail but i keep it real). last i checked i pay the rent. the space is mine. the dog needs to know that when it comes down to. throw away the stupid crates unless your going on a plane. the trading up is however my second option with dogs. cuz that method does work with some dogs. although, in my opinion it's still rewarding bad behavior. there r two types of reinforcment. negative and positive. negative reinforcment is not stuff like hitting your dog or anything like that. wich would be alot of the reasons alot of people don't use it cuz they don't understand it. however, a few on here might. this is what i've done 100's of times with breeds ranging from poodles to wolves. it has worked every time and almost instantly in every situation. (granted this method could be dangerous in extreme resource guarders. so, in that case i use the trade up method.) use your best judgement. ok so here is the dog with his resource. talk to him, let him know your there, b calm. pet him. get close to the resource and tell you dog your command ie. leave it, drop it, out whatever. at the very first sign. the smallest growl, tensing, anything take it away immediately. put it some place outta reach but still visible and probably more importantly to where they can smell it well but can't get to it. of course they r gonna whine and carry on a bit. however, eventually they will calm down. then give it back. give em a few minutes to really get into enjoying it again. start the whole process again. simple as that. actually as i type this i realise that this method is actually positive and negative reinforcment together in a process when you break it down in steps. however, it works 99.9 percent of the time and thats what matters
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» There has since been 9 posts. Last posting by , Jan 6 2:18 pm

Behavior & Training > Dealing With Bone Aggression
Charlie- Brown Cocoa- Puffs

1275296
 
 
Barked: Sun Jan 6, '13 7:42am PST 
ok so i'm gonna rant here a lil. so im gonna appologize right now for not positively reinforcing someones method. first off i'll tell you i've worked with resource guarders, tons of them. i know what works and its alot simpiler then these wishy washy methods people use. simply put. the dog is a dog. you are the human. as far as not getting in the dogs space (oh im gonna get some hate mail but i keep it real). last i checked i pay the rent. the space is mine. the dog needs to know that when it comes down to. throw away the stupid crates unless your going on a plane. the trading up is however my second option with dogs. cuz that method does work with some dogs. although, in my opinion it's still rewarding bad behavior. there r two types of reinforcment. negative and positive. negative reinforcment is not stuff like hitting your dog or anything like that. wich would be alot of the reasons alot of people don't use it cuz they don't understand it. however, a few on here might. this is what i've done 100's of times with breeds ranging from poodles to wolves. it has worked every time and almost instantly in every situation. (granted this method could be dangerous in extreme resource guarders. so, in that case i use the trade up method.) use your best judgement. ok so here is the dog with his resource. talk to him, let him know your there, b calm. pet him. get close to the resource and tell you dog your command ie. leave it, drop it, out whatever. at the very first sign. the smallest growl, tensing, anything take it away immediately. put it some place outta reach but still visible and probably more importantly to where they can smell it well but can't get to it. of course they r gonna whine and carry on a bit. however, eventually they will calm down. then give it back. give em a few minutes to really get into enjoying it again. start the whole process again. simple as that. actually as i type this i realise that this method is actually positive and negative reinforcment together in a process when you break it down in steps. however, it works 99.9 percent of the time and thats what matters
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» There has since been 10 posts. Last posting by , Jan 6 2:18 pm


Puppy Place > Does anyone else live with their littermate?

Charlie- Brown Cocoa- Puffs

1275296
 
 
Barked: Thu Jan 3, '13 4:37am PST 
i have two different examples. My wolves were littermates. for the most part it was good. they encouraged eachother, challenged eachother(mostly in good ways) i had the alpha and omega of the pack. they were trained to pull me on my bike. whenever they were walked or ran they were together on a coupler. however, they did have a couple disaggreements when they got older. they will bound with eachother more than a human wich means when one gets into mischief most likely the other will also. my other is charlie brown. he doesn't live with any of his littermates. however, his sire and brother do visit occasionally. they are always incredibly excited to see eachother. they have had no issues at all. however, i have never taken charlie to their house wich i could see some potential for some issues with his sire. although it hasnt happened yet
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» There has since been 1 post. Last posting by , Jan 3 12:45 pm


Dog Health > More Itchiness.

Charlie- Brown Cocoa- Puffs

1275296
 
 
Barked: Wed Jan 2, '13 10:41pm PST 
ur dog is definately havng some kinda allergic reaction. wich could be alot of things. dogs can even be allergic to their owners. best thing to do is take him to the vet
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» There has since been 4 posts. Last posting by , Jan 6 2:58 pm


Dog Health > Exercise?

Charlie- Brown Cocoa- Puffs

1275296
 
 
Barked: Wed Dec 26, '12 11:56pm PST 
so here is what i do. for one it is very difficult to tire a lab for an extended period. at that age as mentioned allready it is important to limit the type of play ie, jumping, climbing etc. your best friend right now is her prey drive. she likes to play fetch, play fetch alot. couple that with mental stimulation and playing with koda and your dog will get plenty tired. a suggestion for koda, well it would actually work with both or them. get a 50 ft leash and let em run. being next to a busy street with a pup that young i would not trust being out in the unfenced area. cuz, no matter how well you dog is trained at this point she is still young and a dog will be a dog and cars go fast and are made of metal. an accident can happen in a blink of an eye. trust me, its no fun. the tennis court idea is a good one. i don't know why i havent thought of it before. lol. good luck
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» There has since been 2 posts. Last posting by , Dec 28 3:54 pm

Behavior & Training > Dogs new to horses . . .. what are the common reactions?
Charlie- Brown Cocoa- Puffs

1275296
 
 
Barked: Wed Dec 26, '12 11:34pm PST 
ok so dogs are naturally predatory animals. horses are naturally prey animals. the cop is a naturally moronic animal. i've been following charlies story for awhile. first off the horse was not fully trained. he was training. secondly the cop goes into an off leash dog park with a untrained horse. once a police horse is trained. it wont run if threatened. they will lower their head and back whatever threat is there up. personally i don't think the dog ever bit the horse. i think the dog was intimidated at first, went into a protection mode and then when the horse bolted the dog chased him. just like a dog will do with a cat. personally i believe the cuts were gotten along the way on the 1.5 mile run. look at the pics. the cuts are straight. horses (like cats) are usually better at training dogs then humans are. they know how to react to them. this horse got spooked and unfortunately got hurt(he is fine now). the bad thing is the abuse the dog is suffering now while waiting to be killed for being a dog.
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» There has since been 79 posts. Last posting by , Jan 26 4:15 pm

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