GO!

Should I?

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Esme

1236096
 
 
Barked: Fri Feb 24, '12 9:30am PST 
I have been thinking of breeding my pup and then keeping one of the pups (if she has girls) as a friend for her to have. The other idea I had was buying another pom as a friend and or maybe a rescue... But I do not want her to get jealous and feel neglected or that I'm replacing her. I have had her since she was born. What should I do? Should I not do either and just stick with her and find her a puppy pal some other way?
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UCH Onyx TT,- CGC

Do you even- lift?
 
 
Barked: Fri Feb 24, '12 9:58am PST 
I would say breeding your dog is not the best idea. Breeding can get very expensive, should involve health testing to avoid breeding puppies with genetic issues, can be potentially fatal to the mother and/or pups, and brings more puppies into an already overcrowded pet population.

I think looking at breed specific rescues is an excellent idea. Most will let your dog meet a potential adoptee and see how they get along. There are many, many purebred dogs and puppies in shelters that need great homes.
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Jewel, PCD

8.6lbs of fury- in a bow!
 
 
Barked: Fri Feb 24, '12 10:27am PST 
Personally I would be so scared to breed my dog! She actually did give birth in the shelter and her litter had a 50% death rate. I would have had such an emotionally hard time with that had she been mine at the time.

I think breed rescue would be great for you! Like Onxy said you'll likely get to bring your dog to the meeting and find a great match. You might even get to meet other people that are Pom-People and get great advice about your breed. way to go
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Nicky

bitches love- pantaloons
 
 
Barked: Fri Feb 24, '12 10:57am PST 
There are so many Poms in shelters. Mine was pulled by an all breed rescue from a high kill shelter where he could have ended up on death row. I suggest looking into rescues. They are foster home based so they will know the adoptable dog's personality. They also should allow your dogs to meet before adoption to see if they get along. Some even have trial periods.
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Kip & Oogie

Goof Fox & Diva- Squirrel
 
 
Barked: Fri Feb 24, '12 12:00pm PST 
Ultimately, it's up to you- she is your dog and you are free to do what you want.

That said, breeding would be a risky choice. There are always complications that can occur and in some cases either the dam, a puppy/puppies, or both can die during the process. It is also expensive, especially if the dam ends up needing a C-section. Keep in mind- smaller breed dogs are also more prone to complications due to their size. Would you be willing to take those risks?

With that in mind, going through a breed specific rescue or buying a puppy from a sound breeder would be a safer option in terms of your pup's health. If you want an adult/older puppy and go through a rescue, make sure beforehand that your girl gets along with the possible new buddy.

Sometimes, breeders have older puppies/dogs that they keep behind (possible show prospects that didn't turn out as they hoped/retired dams & studs) that they are looking to rehome so you can look there for older dogs as well. A good breeder would also be an excellent place to go if you wanted a young puppy.

If you do decide to breed though, be careful and prepared. Get your girl to the vet and have her tested/looked over- the vet, in addition to testing, can advise you as to whether or not her structure can even handle pregnancy- if a bitch weighs less than 4 pounds, it is generally not advisable to breed her.

Another thing to consider is homes for the possible puppies if you do breed her. Poms typically have small litters- and it would be a good idea to have at least 4 homes lined up before even breeding.

If all the vet testing turns out well and you decide you want to go through it, make sure to breed her with a proven male of sound health/temperament who is smaller than she is, and be prepared both financially and emotionally.

If I were in your shoes, I would personally opt for the rescue or breeder route- the whole pregnancy ordeal would be too stressful for me to handle with my little one even if she was large enough to breed and wasn't spayed!
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Kip & Oogie

Goof Fox & Diva- Squirrel
 
 
Barked: Fri Feb 24, '12 1:20pm PST 
Also, I think it's great that you want to get your girl a friend smile I doubt she will feel neglected having another pup around- in fact, she will probably enjoy the extra company! My two absolutely love having each other to romp and play with, and they definitely don't feel any less loved by me. My boy is much more demanding for my attention than the girl is, though.

A word of advice I've heard is that it is easier to introduce a male into a household with a female as opposed to adding another female. However, I know several households that have two female dogs and have no issues- I think that just boils down to the personality of the dogs in question when determining whether or not they will display same sex aggression (which can be really, REALLY nasty). If you go the rescue route and are set on a female, one that offers a "trial period" would be awesome to make sure that your fluffy lady is cool with sharing her home with another fluffy lady smile
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Esme

1236096
 
 
Barked: Fri Feb 24, '12 1:29pm PST 
I forgot to mention that I have already been through the "breeding process". I bred my pups mom the create her and there were absolutely not complications all dogs were healthy. Like a normal litter there was a runt and she is as big as my pup is now. I wasn't even home for the birth and when I got home to the surprise there was absolutely no mess and the mom is alive and well. Only problem I ran into was the mom lost her hair which is normal.
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Kip & Oogie

Goof Fox & Diva- Squirrel
 
 
Barked: Sat Feb 25, '12 1:44pm PST 
Ah! I didn’t realize that. I’m glad that you had a positive experience and didn’t have any issues.

I wasn’t trying to say “if you breed all of these bad things WILL happen,” I was just trying to point out that there are inherent risks that might happen, and they become more likely the smaller the dam is. Kind of like with people- really tiny, petite women with small hips generally have a much more difficult time in pregnancy/childbirth and end up getting C-sections, which in turn is more dangerous and expensive than natural birthing. My mom is a perfect example of that!

Anyhoo, based on what I’ve read on dogster, most of people on here are going to discourage you from breeding altogether. Many of the few people who are for breeding would only say it is a good idea if you show your dog and she has won awards, in addition to doing it responsibly and breeding her to another champion male who compliments her temperament- as that “betters the breed.”

A very small amount of people on here would say “yes, go for the breeding as long as you do it responsibly (ie: only breed the dam if she is temperamentally stable/structurally sound/large enough/confirmed to be healthy by vet tests, only breed her to a male who is smaller than her who has also met the criteria mentioned for the female, try have homes lined up for the puppies if possible, make sure to have enough money to take care of any medical issues that might arise if there are any complications, etc.)

A huge majority of the people on here are going to encourage you to go the rescue route, and most of them will see that as the only ethical way to go about getting a new dog. A smaller amount will recommend getting your pup from good breeder who health tests/etc.

Honestly, like I said, the safest route is to either adopt through a rescue or to buy a puppy from a solid breeder, because then you don’t ever have the risks of pregnancy to deal with at all. But, if you have had experience and are prepared for any negative things that could happen in the process, she is your dog and you are free to do what you want with her, regardless of what anyone else says you should or should not do.

And yes, blowing coat is super common in Pomeranians following pregnancy. To an extent, unspayed females also blow their coat following a heat cycle even without pregnancy- though the shed is usually not nearly as profuse as it is following whelping puppies. My Oogie went through 1 heat cycle and blew quite a bit of coat following it! She’s just now starting to fluff back up happy dance
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Sebastian

1206753
 
 
Barked: Sat Feb 25, '12 3:49pm PST 
I think the majority of people on Dogster are fine with reputable breeders. I've seen very few people here who think rescue is the only ethical way to get a dog. There are definitely differences of opinion on what qualifies as a "reputable" breeder but I've rarely seen someone condemned for attempting to find a good breeder for their next dog.

I personally feel that performing all health tests relevant to the breed on both parents is the bare minimum when it comes to breeding (and I mean actually getting the tests done, not just having your vet say the dog is healthy). Many genetic health problems don't show up when a dog is breeding age so you can't know if you're passing crippling diseases onto the pups.

As Kip & Oogie said, it's your dog and your choice but since you asked for people's thoughts, I would recommend going the rescue or good breeder route. Breeding is a lot of work, can be a lot of money, and always poses some risks. I'm glad your past breeding experience went smoothly but even extremely experienced breeders can have things go horribly wrong and lose pups or the dam.

And there's the issue of finding homes for all the pups you don't keep and keeping track of what happens to those dogs for the rest of their lives. If their new owners can't keep them at any point, for any reason, you should be willing to take them back and rehome them.

In the end it's your decision but I would implore you not to take the responsibility of breeding lightly.
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Esme

1236096
 
 
Barked: Sun Feb 26, '12 4:23am PST 
I understand what you guys are saying. Also, my dog is more than big enough. She is actually bigger than her mom now and weighs between 6 and 7 pounds. I find that to be big, but she isn't a toy so that is about right for her. But yea I'm just contemplating what to do. Me and my boyfriend attempted to get a male pom as a friend and he was only a pup of like 3 months old I think and already trying to mount her without having the ability to do much so a male is not a route for a friend I would go Neutered or not. But once again thank you for your advice I really appreciate it.
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