GO!

Private Rescue or Shelter?

This is a special section for dogs needing new homes and for inspiring stories of dogs that have found their furever home through Dogster or through the love and energy of rescuers. This is also the place to discuss shelters, rescue organizations, rescue strategies, issues, solutions, etc. and how we can all help in this critical endeavor. Remember that we are all here for the love of dog! If you are posting about a dog that needs a new home, please put your location in the topic of your thread so those close by can find you! Make sure to check out Dogster's dog adoption center!

  
Kashmir- ♥ CGC

Boxer Beach Bum
 
 
Barked: Tue Jun 5, '12 8:50am PST 
My next dog i want to be a rescue. But I am worried if i find one i really like at a private rescue that the adoption criteria might be stricter than a shelter? All my dogs so far have come from breeders and i have never experienced getting a pet from a rescue or shelter yet. I guess my main concerns is that I am a young person and i dont want the rescue to think that i wont take care of the dog. Has anyone else had worries like this before?
[notify]
Lucille

I am the Sock- Bandit!!!
 
 
Barked: Tue Jun 5, '12 9:01am PST 
Find a rescue you jive with before you get your heart set on a particular dog. In other words, it's sort of like a pre-approval for a mortgage. Many good rescues ask for referrals from your vet, maybe even a home visit etc. Ask about the application process, take those steps and go from there. If you are interested in breed specific rescues, that's often a good place to start. They tend to be choosier about placements than a shelter, but they also often know more about the dog and making a good match. They are often fostering the dogs in their homes. Do your research as best you can about the rescue, too. If you're looking at rescuing a specific breed, ask for referrals to a rescue from breeders or others you know and trust who are involved with that breed.

Pulling a dog from a kill shelter yourself can certainly work and be very rewarding, but keep in mind that assessing temperament and making a good match in that situation can be difficult. Best of luck with your decision.
[notify]
Skarlet

1231853
 
 
Barked: Tue Jun 5, '12 9:38am PST 
I've rehomed a couple dogs. One was an English Shepherd we had sold as a puppy but the people could no longer keep because they divorced and moved. He had a rock solid temperment, just needed a little more basic obedience training before we found him a home. One was a VERY shy Aussie that had never had any socialization. We took her in from a friend who was afraid she'd have to be pts, but she vastly improved and is currently leading a happy life with her new family. One was an ex show Aussie that was very calm and sweet with no problems. We have rehomed other dogs also for one reason or another and most were really nice dogs and we were able to give people good backgrounds on the dogs and stay in touch if they had any questions.
My point is you may also want to consider adopting from regular people who can no longer keep their dogs but are don't want to turn them over to a shelter. We were very reasonable in what we expected from the people that adopted the dogs, so long as they were a good match. We also know exactly what the dogs were like because they were living in a normal setting instead of a shelter.
[notify]

Skarlet

1231853
 
 
Barked: Tue Jun 5, '12 9:38am PST 
Edited because it was a douple post. I wish you the best of luck finding the right dog!

Edited by author Tue Jun 5, '12 9:40am PST

[notify]
Duke

I'm Adopted!
 
 
Barked: Tue Jun 5, '12 9:42am PST 
Honestly, unless I was really impressed with the rescue, I would go with a shelter. If you know what you are doing, and are not looking for something too specific, there are a ton of great dogs in shelters. It may also help if there is someone who knows dogs that you could bring along to give you a second opinion-if you do choose to go to a shelter. Good luck on whatever you decide! way to go

Eta: Skarlet's suggestion was also a very good idea!

Edited by author Tue Jun 5, '12 9:43am PST

[notify]
Kashmir- ♥ CGC

Boxer Beach Bum
 
 
Barked: Tue Jun 5, '12 10:11am PST 
Thanks everyone for the great responses and advice. smile I was just thinking about this the other day and though i'd post it. Now this dog I wont be able to get for awhile. But I will look at all those options when looking for a dog. I was really looking for a Shih Tzu or Shih tzu mix or something along that line. Something smaller than a Boxer. way to go I was looking on Petfinder.com and found tons and tons of dogs for adoption that fit that. Whos knows what ill find when I am ready. cheer
[notify]
Savannah- Blue Belle

A Heart of Gold!
 
 
Barked: Tue Jun 5, '12 10:53am PST 
I've done it both ways. What I have done is fill out the papers and get all through the process and then waited until the time was right and the right dog was available.

I've gotten really great pups from two different Humane Societies and the wonderful Cookie from OBGC in the DC area.

Good luck to you!
[notify]
Sanka- I'll Miss- You

The ground is my- newspaper.
 
 
Barked: Tue Jun 5, '12 1:21pm PST 
Some rescues are pretty lax. They know that an ideal situation doesn't come around very often, so they are often willing to send a dog out to a well-meaning owner that may not have all the ideal stuff.

A friend of mine got a hound. They live near a busy road and don't have a fence. Not exactly good for a hound! But the shelter saw that they were responsible and well-meaning and knew that that little hound had been in the rescue far too long. A healthy home environment always trumps kennels.

So, they got the dog with no fuss. I think they may be a little more cautious around the younger crowed due to the likelihood of their lives changing dramatically in the foreseeable future....moving, marriage, maybe kids, etc.
[notify]