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Large breed for SD work

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Thor CGC

God of Thunder
 
 
Barked: Fri Oct 5, '12 3:02pm PST 
I haven't looked into a Bouvier, but I will do that.

Newfies are too much drool and hair for me LOL I love them but they aren't really active enough for me.

I can't do a poodle. The coat would kill me. I believe that bouviers have the same type of coat so that may not work too well :/
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Sarge

Teddybear
 
 
Barked: Fri Oct 5, '12 4:06pm PST 
I've had a few rottweilers before and have never had any issues with same sex aggression. I make sure any breed of dog I get are well socialized at a young age.
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Bianca CGC- TT HIC Thd- ♥

What big ears- you have...
 
 
Barked: Fri Oct 5, '12 6:51pm PST 
Bianca hardly ever whines, and she's not nervous either... thinking
She does bark when people come close to our property, I am sure I could have trained her not to do this if I wanted to but I like the notice.

Edited by author Fri Oct 5, '12 6:54pm PST

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Baby

What'd you say?- I wasn't- listening.
 
 
Barked: Fri Oct 5, '12 11:01pm PST 
I think a good possibility that all of the working GSDs you have met are barky is because they are intense working dogs. Those kinds of dogs are selected in part for their desire to get their favorite toy after doing well, they're very, very toy oriented and just go nuts to see that tug toy or ball. Most dogs I've met that are play driven are yappy when they want to get down to business and play some ball. Their work makes them very excitable as they anticipate their reward. They get very happy thinking about getting down to business and working.

Also, I'm sure if those trainers really felt the need, they could teach a quiet command.

I don't know for sure, but it's what makes the most sense to me. I've been around a lot of shepherds and never noticed them being anxious or yappy; they were only yappy during schutzhund as they sat in front of the "aggressor" waiting for the direction of their handler.
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Katana - (fallen not- forgotten)

Katana's the- name and- pleasin's the- game
 
 
Barked: Sat Oct 6, '12 9:32am PST 
Katana was a large doberman and he did some light mobility work. He was a wonderful SD and his sudden passing a month ago left us staggered and starting Tanks training a little sooner than planned. However Tank as a lab shepherd mix is a rather large boy and after he is two will be getting started with mobility training. He will be a year in January and he is a big help for my hubby's issues.
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Mandi

Many hands make- the load- lighter.
 
 
Barked: Sat Oct 6, '12 11:35am PST 
There's a few giant breeds that would be great. Newfies (though I saw you turned those down), Danes, St Bernards, large labs, Leonbergers, Cane Corsos or anything mastiffy really, Borzoi, Irish Wolfhound, etc.
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Scooter

Work hard; Play- harder.
 
 
Barked: Sat Oct 6, '12 12:19pm PST 
Mandi, well bred Canes and Pressas need a ton of socialization to make them into adequate pets; they are a poor choice for service work.
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Mandi

Many hands make- the load- lighter.
 
 
Barked: Sat Oct 6, '12 3:33pm PST 
Scooter, I know someone who exclusively trains Canes for SD work and has great success with them. I'd disagree that they are poor choices. ANY SD needs tons of socialization. High drive dogs (GSDs, mals, dobermans, labs, GSPs, many hounds, etc) need more work learning to focus on the handler. It doesn't make them bad dogs. In fact, that trait can be useful if you know how to turn it to your advantage. They LOVE to work. It just depends on what you need and want, and how experienced of a trainer you are. I wouldn't want a Cane personally, but I would never suggest that they can't be suitable for the SD lifestyle.
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Thor CGC

God of Thunder
 
 
Barked: Sat Oct 6, '12 3:37pm PST 
Hmmm. That is interesting with shepherds. I have worked with or met around 40 of them and every single one was whiny or anxious thinking I am sure they could teach them to be quiet, but it didn't seem to bother the handlers LOL

I probably wouldn't go with a dane or anything similar just because of their life span.

I am mostly conisidering a GSD, Shiloh, or Rottweiler at this point.
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Mandi

Many hands make- the load- lighter.
 
 
Barked: Sat Oct 6, '12 3:48pm PST 
It's important to note that the lifespan of large breeds is heavily dependent upon their diet and exercise. If you feed them really good stuff, they live MUCH longer. I've known many Danes that are 15 or older and still going strong. Same with other giant breeds. What they eat and how much exercise they get is key.

Also, from your description, what you are seeing in the GSDs is likely not anxiety, but rather excitement. They are high drive dogs who LOVE to do their job. They will do anything to get a task done and get the reward at the end, and are generally quivering with excitement and anticipation at their handlers next command. These are the high drive working dogs used by the military and police forces. You can find other dogs who are not bred to have as high of a drive, which will eliminate that behavior. You can also train them not to vocalize.

Edited by author Sat Oct 6, '12 3:50pm PST

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