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My 3 month Akita HELP!

Got a new, young, furry love in your life? This is the place for you to ask all of your questions-big or small! Just remember that you are receiving advice from other dog owners and lovers... not professionals. If you have a major problem, always seek the advice of a vet or behaviorist! Most important is to remember to have fun with your new fur baby.

  
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MIKA&KAI

Akita Pals- Always.
 
 
Barked: Sun Sep 30, '12 12:56am PST 
Put him in the tub/sink/or whatever you plan to bathe him in,it takes quite awhile to get them wet by the way,use only as much shampoo as you need and one for sensitive skin like aloe or oatmeal dog shampoo is best,then rinse him thoroughly. Akitas are very clean on their own,have no doggie smell,very sensitive skin and should be bathed no more than twice a year,usually during the times they (blow) their coat,they will shed the entire undercoat during the late winter or early spring and again in the late summer/early fall.
If you are calm,firm,and matter of fact,he will get used to it in just a short time and should be fine.

2.He will eventually come to you when you call but needs to be trained to do that,no puppy will come when you call without being trained.

3.Potty training I explained before,he needs to be taken out on a leash,walked around the yard about every 2 hours,must stay out until he goes,be praised or rewarded,then brought in.Potty time can not be seen as playtime,he is there to do his business.

4. Akitas do not typically eat as much as other breeds their size but do drink alot.
5. He should be checked over by a vet to make sure he does not have worms,or a urinary tract infection,you should also be getting him vaccines for at least rabies,parvo,and distemper and discuss others that are necessary with your vet.
6. He will learn to walk on a leash,he needs to be trained how to do that for right now allow him to walk and explore when he goes for potty trips until he goes. He is also most likely teething,you need to give him something he likes to chew instead of your hands,if he refuses to play with a toy like a braided rope made for dogs,then you need to turn your back and ignore him for a few minutes until he is calmer and yes,puppy teeth are very sharp,the teeth of a full grown Akita are DANGEROUS,that is why he needs to learn that you make the rules.If turning your back does not stop the biting then crating or gating him away from you for a few minutes until he settles down and you can try playing again is usually the last resort.
7.Akitas are very smart and get bored easily that is why training sessions must be kept short. Does he like his food? By the way what are you feeding him? Akitas should be fed a grain-free,soy-free food.You should also be giving him fish-oil capsules,vitamin E,and glucosamine suppliments.
8. Akitas are very different and not a breed for everyone,they take alot of time,energy,effort and TONS of patience to be well behaved,not agressive,and enjoyable safe pets. Mika at 5 listens well and behaves like an angel,Kai having just turned 3 still has some behaviors to work on,he is just finishing his teen years. None of us were trying to be mean to you we are trying to help you understand that they require alot of work and special handling by someone who is well prepared for what they are getting into BEFORE they bring one home,they are not a breed you get just because they look nice and that loyalty you read about along with respect are earned,not guaranteed.
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Mishka &- Luna

1263406
 
 
Barked: Sun Sep 30, '12 6:44am PST 
Like Onyx and Mika&Kai have said we're not labeling you as an "irresponsible owner". We're simply trying to help you. Now that you have already bought the akita pup, there is no turning back.. You must do your research on the Japanese Akita Inu NOW before it becomes too late. I see this all the time with ppl who own or get huskies. They buy them because they're "gorgeous" dogs before doing their research on the breed. Then the huskies end up in the shelter or getting resold because no one realizes the energy they have and if they are not exercised properly they will cause mass destruction. They also don't realize the huskies are escape artists and are incredibly intelligent. Like huskies Akitas need someone who has TONS of PATIENCE with training. You need to start your training early. Might as well start now. Enroll Turbo in puppy classes at either petco or petsmart. This will help him out in ppl and dog socialization. I have seen these dogs in the wrong hands of ppl and they become aggressive. That's why so many ppl see an akita and automatically assume they are all dangerous.

ALL puppies have sharp teeth and go through the phase that they want to chew on everything including you. That's why you need to teach turbo that biting (even play biting) is not okay. Everrytime the puppy bites redirect him with a toy or stand up and ignore him for 2 minutes or until he calms down then resume play as soon as he's calm. Especially with Akita's, you need to teach this ASAP!

Akita's need the type of owner that is going to let them know that you are ALPHA. Otherwise they will walk all over you. It is best to show that role now. Every day gently roll your puppy on its back and keep it on its back for at least a couple min every day. Being put on their back is a submissive position to the dog. When they look up at you it is suppose to show them that you are Alpha. This is what mother dogs do to their pups and their wolf ancestors do to the pack. It shows their place in the family or totem pole of the family. It is best to start at a young age because when they get bigger it's going to be harder to teach them your alpha and to roll them on their back. Prepare the puppy will fight to get off their back. you must hold them onto their back firmly. Not so hard that it'll hurt them.

As I have done with my husky puppies, I would take them out every hour or after they eat, sleep and play. Puppies do not have bladder control so they will potty wherever they find is a good place to squat. Once you see your puppy sniffing and circling looking for a place to potty, take the puppy outside on a leash. Don't go in until the puppy has pottied. Once the puppy relieves himself praise him with pets and "good boy" or w/e you use as a praise. Make it out to be a big deal. Once the puppy sees what he did is good then he'll start to realize that the bathroom is outside. Another helpful way is to train him with bells on the door. Craft stores usually have bells especially in the season aisles. Put bells on the door. Every time you take turbo outside take his paw so it touches the bell so that it jingles then take him outside. Do this every time you take him outside. This is another way for him to tell you that he needs to go outside.

Also keep him in your sights at all time. Like all the other posters have said, tether him to you so you can keep an eye on what he is doing. Puppies love to get into mischief and puppies tend to chew on things up until they are about a year old. The times you can't supervise him, crate him.

You must show that the crate is a "GOOD THING" and not a bad place where he goes when he did something naughty. Every time you feed him, put his food in the crate with the door open. Put toys in there as well. He'll soon understand that the crate is his "personal space".

All these things are going to take time and patience especially with an Akita. They are a strong minded, strong willed, and independent breed. A lot things have to be on their terms. Like playing and cuddling. My huskies are the same way. Although Akitas and Huskies are two very different breeds they are a lot alike in some aspects. Your biggest thing right now is to teach the puppy that "biting" is not okay. Unlike huskies, akita's who aren't taught this important manner will use it when they are older because they will think it was okay. And this could put you in jeopardy as the owner of this said akita.

We are only trying to help you as an owner to properly socialize and train your new addition so you won't have problems later in life.

Listen to what M&K tells you. She's very good at what she does with her akitas.
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Farley

Farlekiin the- Dragonborn
 
 
Barked: Sun Sep 30, '12 1:42pm PST 
"Every day gently roll your puppy on its back and keep it on its back for at least a couple min every day. Being put on their back is a submissive position to the dog."

Personally I'd waiver this advice for any breed of dog.
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Toto, CD, RN, CGC

We don't do- doodles!!!
 
 
Barked: Sun Sep 30, '12 3:33pm PST 
I've been raising puppies for over 40 years and I have NEVER seen a mother dog roll a puppy over onto its back or roll it anywhere or pin it or hold it down. IF a puppy (or any dog, for that matter)does go onto its back, it does it willingly, on its own and is NOT TOUCHED by another dog NOR should it be rolled/held down by a human. All that teaches is that you ARE very unpredictable and will do painful/scary things to your pup.
Even if a mother dog did roll and hold puppies, which they do not, you are not a dog and your puppy knows that and will react accordingly.
Any trainer still teaching students to roll their pups and hold them down is still in the dark ages of dog training and obviously has not kept up with more normal, natural AND NICER methods of training which will teach respect between you and your dog rather than make you a bully and your pup afraid of you.

edited for spelling/grammar

Edited by author Sun Sep 30, '12 3:39pm PST

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Sabi

When the night- closes in I will- be there
 
 
Barked: Sun Sep 30, '12 6:17pm PST 
IF I was going to play the Alpha game, I would not pick a breed like the Akita to do it with. The problem with Alpha theory training is that Alphas get challenged, it's nature.
My dogs know I am a bigger B. then either of them buts thats a whole different storylaugh out loud
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Shiver Me- Timbers- "Charlie"

My Little Dog, a- heartbeat at my- feet.<3
 
 
Barked: Sun Sep 30, '12 6:36pm PST 
Akita's need the type of owner that is going to let them know that you are ALPHA. Otherwise they will walk all over you. It is best to show that role now. Every day gently roll your puppy on its back and keep it on its back for at least a couple min every day. Being put on their back is a submissive position to the dog. When they look up at you it is suppose to show them that you are Alpha. This is what mother dogs do to their pups and their wolf ancestors do to the pack. It shows their place in the family or totem pole of the family. It is best to start at a young age because when they get bigger it's going to be harder to teach them your alpha and to roll them on their back. Prepare the puppy will fight to get off their back. you must hold them onto their back firmly. Not so hard that it'll hurt them.

Saying that alphas in wolf packs roll their subordinates onto their backs is false. It is also false that their mothers will do it to their pups. In fact, submissive wolves in the wild OFFER the submissive positions, without being touched at all - it's like the structure of a family - the mom and kids. The kids try to appease and keep mom from getting mad. Alpha rolls happen in play(not an actual 'alpha roll') and when one is going to KILL another. Much research has been done since the term alpha came out. THIS IS OUTDATED INFORMATION. DO NOT roll your puppy onto their back! My cousin tried this with her husky and what happened? The dog couldn't escape, so instead, she attacked my cousin. My cousin was bit EVERY SINGLE TIME she rolled Shasta, until I found out she was doing that and told her how to TEACH Shasta instead. She was never bit again after she stopped rolling her.

You put your dog into a state of flight or fight. If they can't get away, you'll get hurt and let's face it, you don't want to be attacked by ANY dog, let alone bit.

Please ignore the advice to roll your puppy. It is outdated and will result in a lack of trust from your pup. You want to build trust! You want your dog to ENJOY being with you and alpha rolling will only cause otherwise.

Everyone else has given great advice otherwise.
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Farley

Farlekiin the- Dragonborn
 
 
Barked: Sun Sep 30, '12 6:49pm PST 
To add to what was already said about "alpha rolling", ESPECIALLY with a very young puppy, the last thing you want to teach it is to be afraid when your hand comes at it. Whether you're "alpha rolling" it, or spanking it, or something else forceful. The pup will learn to expect pain or discomfort whenever you reach for it. Not a good way to begin a healthy/trusting relationship with the pup.
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Mishka &- Luna

1263406
 
 
Barked: Sun Sep 30, '12 9:21pm PST 
ALL my dogs that I have now were taught to be rolled on their back to know they are subordinate. And neither of them are afraid of my hand or are thinking they are going to be harmed. When we got Mishka she had tried to bite us when we grabbed her collar, a friend of mine who has huskies as well told us to roll her on her back. My trainer who has malinois's taught me this and every puppy training book I own has also said this. And I have seen both Luna and Mishka teach the orphan puppies this. I do not appreciate all the negative comments about what I have said.
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Member Since
01/04/2009
 
 
Barked: Mon Oct 1, '12 4:46am PST 
When my girl was a puppy, she was very willful and often challenged me. I NEVER ever alpha rolled her.

I put her in an obedience class and she learned through positive interactions that listening to me was beneficial for her. Through positive reinforcement, patience, and my desire to learn what made her tick, we made it through the puppy phase, and now she's a happy, well trained, confidant adult dog who is a joy to own.

While some people still feel that alpha rolling is the way to go, in the wrong context, it could earn you a serious bite AND you could lose the trust of your dog.

The only time I've ever put a puppy on its back is to do a temperament evaluation on a litter to see how the pup responded. But, I've never used it as a general practice.
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Toto, CD, RN, CGC

We don't do- doodles!!!
 
 
Barked: Mon Oct 1, '12 5:53am PST 
"The only time I've ever put a puppy on its back is to do a temperament evaluation on a litter to see how the pup responded. But, I've never used it as a general practice."

AND, that temperament evaluation is done ONCE and the pup is still cradled in the arms of the testor, which makes a HUGE difference in what is happening to the puppy!!
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