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Eggshells for calcium

This is the place to share your best homemade dog food and treat recipes with each other! Remember to use caution if your pet has allergies and to make any diet changes gradually so that your dog's stomach can adjust to the new foods you are introducing.

  
Adam

Vaccine free- -Disease free- goes pawinpaw
 
 
Barked: Thu Mar 31, '11 10:43am PST 
My coworker would like to know how many eggshells to add to her new homecooking diet per day for her 10 lb mixed 5 year old dog? The little guy is active and will eat a whole egg shell and all LOL! He loves his new diet! Must thank forums like these for educating about it.
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Maxwell

I'm triple- superior MAD- now!
 
 
Barked: Thu Mar 31, '11 11:16am PST 
Add 1/2 measuring teaspoon of *powdered* eggshell per pound of food. If the recipe doesn't have any whole grains or other high phosphorus foods then using dicalcium phosphate or human food grade bone meal might be a better choice of calcium supplement. But for now, eggshell is very good.

I dried the egg shell in the oven so it was really crispy then ground it in an old coffee mill to a powder.
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Samson

Work? What's- that?
 
 
Barked: Thu Mar 31, '11 11:32am PST 
I let Samson eat whole eggshells along with the rest of the egg and they just seemed to go right through him. Like the above poster said you probably have to grind them up for them to work.
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Rexy

I dig in mud- puddles!
 
 
Barked: Thu Mar 31, '11 12:08pm PST 
Maxwell, would the amount of eggshell added not vary with what meat you are adding it to?

1 tsp of dried, powdered eggshell = 1800 mg of Calcium

When I make my cats' raw food, I aim for a 1:1.2 Ca/Ph ratio.

The amount of eggshell I add to a batch of food depends on the type of meat I am using, and the amount of the meat.

I grind eggshells in a coffee grinder. Works very well. (this grinder is only used for this purpose)
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Adam

Vaccine free- -Disease free- goes pawinpaw
 
 
Barked: Thu Mar 31, '11 1:47pm PST 
Thankyou I'll pass on the info! I am sooo glad I don't homecook. I like the balance of ph and ca in bones this would confuse me but her dog is tiny and scarfs down food so she's nervous about RMBs.
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Maxwell

I'm triple- superior MAD- now!
 
 
Barked: Thu Mar 31, '11 1:48pm PST 
Absolutely figure it precisely if you like. The 1/2 tsp is a general rule that gets you in the ball park. Better to have 80-120% the amount of calcium needed than 20-300% for instance!

I have noticed that chicken and white rice heavy type recipes need more phosphorus and recipes with organ meat, fish and whole grains might be okay with just egg shell.
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Rexy

I dig in mud- puddles!
 
 
Barked: Fri Apr 1, '11 11:19am PST 
The USDA Nutrient database is a fantastic place to get information on calcium and phophorus contents of meats (cooked and raw).

USDA Nutrient Database Link
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