GO!

can moistening dry dog food cause bloat

Discuss ways to improve the quality of your dog's life and longevity through proper nutrition; a place for all of your questions and answers about feeding your pooch!

Please keep discussions fun, friendly, and helpful at all times. Non-informative posts criticizing a particular brand or another poster’s choice of food are not allowed in this Forum. References to any brand of food as "junk," "garbage," or other harsh names will be removed.

  
(Page 1 of 2: Viewing entries 1 to 10)  
Page Links: 1  2  
Nala

Im a character
 
 
Barked: Tue Mar 29, '11 6:54pm PST 
I usually moisten her food since shes a picky eater
[notify]
Taggert

Semper Vorax
 
 
Barked: Tue Mar 29, '11 8:10pm PST 
no, actually it has to do with how the stomach is set, and that is genetic, maybe. Some breeds are prone to it. is there even a consensus on why it happens?

Elevating the food helps, as well as slowing down the eating. I know plenty of people that not only moisten, but float the kibbles in water. Floating the kibble slows down eating.
[notify]
Ava

Super Friendly- Aviator
 
 
Barked: Tue Mar 29, '11 8:19pm PST 
when I float Ava's kibble in water she licks it up like it's wet food (well, it kind of is... but still crunchy since it hasn't absorbed the water yet) and wont chew the pieces. It worries me that she might choke or have to puke later, so I always let the kibble absorb the water before giving it to her. smile
[notify]

Pookie

plush destroyer
 
 
Barked: Tue Mar 29, '11 9:01pm PST 
I don't think anyone really knows what causes bloat or how to prevent it. I have yet to read anything that's convinced me anyway. shrug

Edited by author Tue Mar 29, '11 9:02pm PST

[notify]
Bruno CGC

Honorary Kelpie
 
 
Barked: Tue Mar 29, '11 11:12pm PST 
Ava- I have NEVER seen Sampson chew a single kibble in his life, (just uses his tongue and it's down the hatch!) but has never gotten sick from it. I think it doesn't really matter very much if dogs chew their kibble or not. Bruno seems to chew it, but when he gets carsick and vomits, it still looks like kibble on the way up. So what the hey?
[notify]
Quincy- FM TFE-II- TDIAOV CGC

I have just met- you and I LOVE- you!
 
 
Barked: Wed Mar 30, '11 5:56am PST 
Purdue University released a bloat study a few years ago with a lot of claims of varying things that lead to "heightened risk". This included moistening the food, elevating the food, feeding foods with citric acid, etc. However, the study was statistical. They focused on Great Danes and breeds that were prone to it, and asked breeders and the like to relay their experiences. They took all of that and published it as research. There is little to no scientific backing as to what all of these things actually do to increase the risk of bloat. For that reason, I completely doubt the study and it's findings. Bloat is still a big mystery to us. You can do everything "right" and it can still happen. You could do everything "wrong" and it may never happen. So, as for the food wetting thing, I moisten my dogs' food with hot water every meal. I figure that the stomach is going to make the food bloat up anyways, I'd rather have it do so before the food goes in so the stomach can ease into it. Plus, it brings out the flavors of the food a bit more, and my dogs seem to enjoy it. Slows them down a bit, too. So, I'd say just keep doing what your doing.
[notify]
Nala

Im a character
 
 
Barked: Wed Mar 30, '11 7:16am PST 
@Quincy TY, you have calmed my nerves
[notify]
Lia

Lia Bia Teddy- Bear
 
 
Barked: Wed Mar 30, '11 8:36am PST 
Quincy way to go

I'm paranoid about bloat too, esp w/ Lia because she seems to have the perfect body for it. The main preventative measure I take is not letting them eat alot before exercising, or right after heavy exercise. I've read that bloat has to do w/ the amount of air taken in or already in the stomach along with the food. So I wouldn't give a meal to a dog that is panting heavily, and if your dog is a major gulper I would try to get them to slow down. big grin
[notify]
Quincy- FM TFE-II- TDIAOV CGC

I have just met- you and I LOVE- you!
 
 
Barked: Wed Mar 30, '11 9:47am PST 
No problem smile With 2 deep chested dogs, bloat isn't an issue I take lightly. Genetics do have something to do with it, some dogs are just more prone to it than others, just like ACL tears. I've also heard that stress can be a factor. There is a surgery that can be done to keep the stomach from flipping, I've heard of people having it done with their spay, but I don't think it's totally necessary. I keep my guys from gulping up lots of air, I think moistening the food actually slows my guys down a lot, they lick up a lot more now. I personally don't elevate food dishes, but don't really have a problem with it. And the citric acid thing I find to be complete nonsense. I think the best thing you can do is be aware of the early signs and have a plan of action (I always try and make sure I know of the closest ER vet to where I am at, even (especially) when I travel. Glad we were of some help. blue dog
[notify]
Adam

Vaccine free- -Disease free- goes pawinpaw
 
 
Barked: Wed Mar 30, '11 9:54am PST 
I just posted a link about poor quality food associated with expanding in water. So really if you feed poor quality kibble, that can contribute to bloat. The expanding is what can help turn the stomach. Some studies link citric acid when mixed with water to bloat, but I've read just as many articles debunking that study (Purdue university). I think if you feed healthy, don't have activity right after eating, keep the dog healthy in other ways, than you do more to reduce the chances of bloat than whether kibble is wet or dry.
[notify]
  (Page 1 of 2: Viewing entries 1 to 10)  
Page Links: 1  2