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Epitheliotropic Lymphoma

This forum is for dog lovers seeking everyday advice and suggestions on health-related issues. Remember, however, that advice on a public forum simply can't be a substitute for proper medical attention. Only your vet can say assuredly what is best for your dog.

  
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Alonzo

Toilet Water- Just Tastes- Better
 
 
Barked: Sun Dec 2, '12 6:58pm PST 
I took a class on comparitive oncology, so maybe I could help out a bit. This is actually a rare cancer. The dermatitis by infiltration of neoplastic T lymphocytes. Which form does your dog have? The disease in humans and dogs is very similar. Unfortunately, prognisis is poor. Treatment is rarely very effective. There has been some success in using Lomustine. Since this is such a rare cancer, there is not a lot of research done on it. In this disease, there is a specific tropism in the T lymphocytes for the epidermis. The three forms are MF, PR, and SS. It is actually fairly similar to non-epitheliotropic lymphoma. It can be primary or secondary to disseminated lymphoma. Epitheliotropic lymphoma has been recognized by the medical community for some 200 years, yet there still is no successful treatment. cry
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Wilbur

Texas Fatso
 
 
Barked: Sun Dec 2, '12 7:05pm PST 
I'm so sorry, but this type of cancer has a poor prognosis. Dogs rarely survive more than 10 months after diagnosis. It is most common between dogs ages 9 and 10. It affects all breeds of dogs. It can affect the skin, mucous membranes, or foot pads. The skin is often red. The dog will loose it's black pigmentation. The lips will get thicker. You may find skin nodules. As the cancer progresses, the lymph nodes often become enlarged. Dogs often become lethargic. How is his overrall health? I'm very sorry to hear that your dog is suffering from epitheliotropic lymphoma. It is a terrible diagnosis. Initially, EL is slow to progress. A lot of people may attribute the symptoms to allergies and not get a diagnosis in time. If your dog is in the early stages, surgery to remove the areas of infection can help give your dog a bit more time.
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Uma

Leader of the- Pack
 
 
Barked: Sun Dec 2, '12 9:59pm PST 
All I really know about treatment is that it can be treated with steroids. Also, it is diagnosed through a skin biopsy.
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Chester, A- Springer- Angel

Is it time to- eat??!!
 
 
Barked: Mon Dec 3, '12 9:06pm PST 
cry We're waiting to hear back from the vet. Since the diagnosis only a week ago, there are spots starting to appear in several areas of his back. The one he got just today is big, at least a silver dollar size of hair and skin gone. Hopefully the vet can direct us with some options to help the open areas of skin less bothersome to him. For the most part he doesn't bother them and never scratches them but the one today on the lower back looks like he licked it. I really hope the vet has some options for keeping him comfortable. Despite it all, he is still currently a very happy dog.
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Fritz

Fritz, cats are- fun when they- run
 
 
Barked: Tue Dec 4, '12 3:38am PST 
hughughug
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Chester, A- Springer- Angel

Is it time to- eat??!!
 
 
Barked: Tue Dec 4, '12 8:02pm PST 
Took him in to the vet today because these spots started popping up all over the place. Either secondary to the cancer or from starting on the prednisone, he ended up with an infection. It is actually good news since it is treatable. They started him on antibiotics and medicated baths 3X a week. Hopefully he will feel relief from the skin irritations soon.
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Jocelyn

Is it time to- eat?
 
 
Barked: Tue Dec 4, '12 8:39pm PST 
We are new on Dogster. To be honest, you are probably not going to get a lot of good answers on a community forum for something this severe. How long ago was your dog diagnosed? You said you already started the prednisone. Is there anyway you can post a copy of the biopsy results? That would maybe help some of us with your dog's medical crisis. I'm curious to see the results, too. I'm very sorry you are dealing with this. Cancer is never expected. There are other therapies available other than steroids. Steroids don't prolong life with this disease. I recommend looking into a drug called lomustine. Some dogs have gone into remission within 4-6 months following treatment. There is a steroid spray called Genesis that can help relieve the itching of the lesions. But, you must prevent the dog from licking the steroid spray off of himself.
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Chance

How You Doin'?
 
 
Barked: Tue Dec 4, '12 10:59pm PST 
hug
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Jocelyn

Is it time to- eat?
 
 
Barked: Tue Dec 4, '12 11:09pm PST 
This disease is often called mycosis fungoides. It's a malignant cancer. In cats it is linked to FeLV. But, it usually affects older dogs. Both genders are equally affected. It can present with red skin, loss of pigment, single lumps, or thickening tissue. Cats get red lumps. The lymph nodes are often enlarged, too. This cancer is diagnosed with a skin biopsy. The prognosis is very grave. The average survival time is five months. Treatment usually involves surgery to remove cancerous areas. Multiple leasions can be difficult to treat. Topical chemotheraputic drugs can be used. There is no prevention for this disease.
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Chester, A- Springer- Angel

Is it time to- eat??!!
 
 
Barked: Wed Dec 5, '12 8:13am PST 
Jocelyn, we don't have a copy of the biopsy report. We discussed some options with our vet when he went in yesterday and because of the nature of his cancer and the fact several previous attempts to figure out what was going on delayed diagnosis several months, we decided the best course of action is to just stay on the course with prednisone. She did show me how to check his lymph nodes so I can monitor it and we also discussed some of the signs to watch for if it is spreading. You can see the pic on my page of what it looks like, surgery was never an option. It has affected the entire gum line of the teeth. To be honest, it never struck me as cancer making the diagnosis hard to swallow. We had tried a few avenues including a dental to try and to solve the issue before sending in the tissue sample. I do realize the prognosis is poor but we are certainly doing what we can to make what time he has left, all quality. We also just purchased a comfy cone for him until we can get the skin infection under control.
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