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preventing regurgitation?

This forum is for dog lovers seeking everyday advice and suggestions on health-related issues. Remember, however, that advice on a public forum simply can't be a substitute for proper medical attention. Only your vet can say assuredly what is best for your dog.

  
Bama AKA- "Buddybear'

'Just as cuddly- as i look!'
 
 
Barked: Mon Nov 22, '10 8:18am PST 
Bama has always had issues with drinking water and then throwing it back up.
And, the same thing with food periodiacally.

Last night about 2.5 hrs after eating his food came back up whole...like it was not digested at all. Then he was breathing very rapid and noisily the rest of the night until 6am.
I went ahead and took him to the vet bc he had us scared to death. The vet said he probably aspirated some food into his lungs, and that it can cause pneumonia but with the symptoms just showing up yesterday that nothing would probably show up on an xray.
His breathing is better today and the vet gave him some meds just incase I guess to prevent infection.

I just need to know is there any way to prevent the regurgitation? I am worried. I always called it vomiting but now I realize that's not what's usually going on.
I have read some about megaesophagus so that kind of freaks me out. But, could it just be a type of acid reflux maybe? It's just weird bc water seems to choke him sometimes.
The vet tech said to try to get him to eat slower.

Edited by author Mon Nov 22, '10 8:19am PST

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Kazba

976223
 
 
Barked: Mon Nov 22, '10 4:22pm PST 
I was going to say something about getting the dog to eat slower. You can either buy a bowl that is made to slow them down or you can put a big rock in the bowl that they have to move around to get to the food. As far as the water, I have no idea how to keep that from coming back up. I do wish you the best of luck and hope you find something that works.
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Pepper

Got food? I- can be bought ya- know....
 
 
Barked: Mon Nov 22, '10 4:32pm PST 
Fast eaters and over drinkers tend to throw up food and water now and then.
To slow eating I serve the food in a muffin baking pan with sticky canned food so the dog has to clean each little well of the pan. The rock or ball in the pan did nothing to slow Pepper, Pam or Sonny.

To solve the water problem I put ice cubes in the bowl so they couldn't drink too much at one time.

Hope it helps and that it's nothing more involved than that.
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Bama AKA- "Buddybear'

'Just as cuddly- as i look!'
 
 
Barked: Tue Nov 23, '10 4:51am PST 
Thanks.
Yeah, our bulldog Brodie always ate way too fast and we placed a toy in the middle of his bowl and it slowed him down pretty good. Now we don't have to do it anymore.
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Leah, CGC

All the Beauty- with none of the- Brains
 
 
Barked: Tue Nov 23, '10 10:34am PST 
Bama - get some pH paper (you can usually find it in garden supply stores) and use it to determine if the liquid is vomit or regurg. Vomitus, which comes from the stomach, is acidic due to the HCL present in the stomach juices. Regurgitation, which comes from the esophogus, is basic since is is infused with sodium bicarbonate from cells of esophogus. This will help you to determine where exactly this is coming from.

After than....slowing down the food intake can help. Some dogs do suffer from GERD or acid reflux which can result in regurgitation before or after meals. Often water will make it occur too. Treatment of acid reflux is pretty easy and benign. Stomach acid blockers can be given daily, something like famotadine (pepcid) or omeprazole (prilosec).

As for megaesophogus (ME), this is much more common in your larger breeds (think GSD, Golden, Shar Pei, Mastiff) in my experience although I do know it has a genetic link in shnauzers and wire fox terriers. It is also very common in dogs suffering from hypothyriod so anytime ME is suspected a full thyroid panel should be checked. Supplementation with thyroxazine can resolve some cases of ME. ME Info

Some other possible things affecting the espophogus/GI tract could be stricters, ulcers, foreign bodies or vascular ring anomoly. Stricters are abnormal narrowings of the esophogus that can be caused by FB's, ulcers etc. Ulcers have now been found to be caused by a specific bacteria (H. Pylori) which once sets in attacks the wall of the GI tract and causes pain and discomfort. A foreign body could be present in the esophogeal wall. It may not be blocking the tube but imbedded in wall causing irritation etc... Vascular ring anomolies are congenital so you would suspect this to be a more chronic (especially since very young) issue if it where going on.

There is also the possibility of tumors (benign or malignant), hernias, and inflammatory disease or response.

In all of the above cases the best diagnostic tool is an endoscopic exam under full anesthesia. This tube shaped camera is passed down the throat and shows live on a TV screen exactly what is going on inside the esophogus and into the stomach. It is also possible for them to take biopsies of funny looking areas while they are there too.

Here is a good link about causes and treatments of regurgitation --> Regurgitation in Dogs

My first step would be to determine if this is regurgitation or vomitus. Then I would discuss with my vet a dose of acid blocker like pepcid, omeprazole, zantac or cimetadine. If no change is seen after a couple weeks with the stomach acid blockers I would schedule a consult with a local Internal Medicine Specialist to discuss endoscopy.
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Bama AKA- "Buddybear'

'Just as cuddly- as i look!'
 
 
Barked: Tue Nov 23, '10 3:19pm PST 
Leah, thanks a bunch.
The vet didn't act overly concerned. Although it was after I left that I got to thinking about how much it seems to happen. This is the first time with the breathing issue though.
How much pepcid, etc would I give him? I use something called RANITIDINE as the active ingred, it's the generic of Zantac I think for acid reflux. Could he have that? If not, how is the dosing for the other?
I am leaning more to thinking reflux in Bama. It seems like it's happened more since I added the Ziwi Peak to his food. Plus he's the one that's always got more bites of people food. Maybe some of the things bothers him that we give him.
But, he has always from time to time did the same thing with water. Even if it doesn't come back up he'll sort of cough/choke like. Nothing serious though.

Do you see regular acid reflux causing the regurgitation and sometimes aspirating in other patients?

Edited by author Tue Nov 23, '10 3:28pm PST

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Bama AKA- "Buddybear'

'Just as cuddly- as i look!'
 
 
Barked: Tue Nov 23, '10 3:29pm PST 
I looked up some symptoms of Acid reflux and he doesn't have any of the pain or weight loss, just the regurgitation.
thinking

Edited by author Tue Nov 23, '10 3:40pm PST

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Bama AKA- "Buddybear'

'Just as cuddly- as i look!'
 
 
Barked: Thu Nov 25, '10 3:43pm PST 
wave
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Leah, CGC

All the Beauty- with none of the- Brains
 
 
Barked: Fri Nov 26, '10 8:43am PST 
Hey Bama - it is possible to have mild Acid Reflux that only shows its self as mild regurgitation and nothing else. We see this alot. Many times the symptoms they list are for more indepth cases.
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Bama AKA- "Buddybear'

'Just as cuddly- as i look!'
 
 
Barked: Fri Nov 26, '10 11:55am PST 
Ok thanks. That's what we are thinking.
I just pawmailed you before I saw this.

Should I try the pepsid or is ranitidine ok? How much?
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