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Slippery elm bark

This forum is for dog lovers seeking everyday advice and suggestions on health-related issues. Remember, however, that advice on a public forum simply can't be a substitute for proper medical attention. Only your vet can say assuredly what is best for your dog.

  
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Bailey

Poo is yummy!
 
 
Barked: Mon Apr 27, '09 7:01am PST 
I noticed alot of people recommending slippery elm bark for gut soothing. Is this a totally safe thing to do?

Does anyone know what doseage they get? Is it a pill, liquid?

I want to get some to have on hand since Bailey has such stomach issues!

TIA
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Tanuk CGC

Sherpa Tanuk of- Everest
 
 
Barked: Mon Apr 27, '09 11:10am PST 
It's perfectly safe for cats and dogs. What it does is lubricate the passageways, thus soothing and making it easier to pass food and stools. I've always used the liquid and just put it on the food. Generally co-ops and natural food stores sell it. It is also available in pill form. Not sure on the dosage for your dog. Our cat just gets a dropper full.
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Bailey

Poo is yummy!
 
 
Barked: Mon Apr 27, '09 11:56am PST 
Thanks, I will check around and see if I can find any.
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Jessica CGC

Will work for- food
 
 
Barked: Mon Apr 27, '09 11:56am PST 
i'm not totally against it and have used it. but some people think dogs are strictly carnivores , and of course slipper elm is derived from a plant. beneficial for relief, but will just mask the problem, and long term use of plant stuff, i don't knowshrug
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Bailey

Poo is yummy!
 
 
Barked: Mon Apr 27, '09 1:15pm PST 
I guess mostly it would be used on an as needed basis. Bailey has had icky stomach for 7 years on and off. Usually it is once a week and I am hoping that maybe it would help on her off days. And hopefully it would help with my oops of giving her raw chicken necks she couldn't handle.red face

Plus, well, my dogs do get raw veggies occasionally. I know alot of people don't believe in that but I dont mind the occasional raw fruit or veggie. I think the biggest enemy in their lives is me.big laugh
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Tanuk CGC

Sherpa Tanuk of- Everest
 
 
Barked: Mon Apr 27, '09 2:19pm PST 
No animal eats strictly meat. Even if they are a carnivore, they get needed nutrients from the plant matter their prey eats. Most pet food has fruits and vegetables in it anyway. The slippery elm is fine, I have many friends that use it on their cats and dogs and it has helped them out with no negative effects. Some can have an allergy to it though, so just make sure to keep an eye on your pet when you first use it.
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Jessica CGC

Will work for- food
 
 
Barked: Mon Apr 27, '09 4:15pm PST 
well technically there was a wolf study done shown they do disregard stomach content (learned about that off the rawfeeding forum) I just would rather want to use all animal based if i could, or fix whatever is making the dog need the slippery elm to begin with (if possible of course). I give my dogs lots of non meat things like fruit and veggies too, even some dairy. i guess personally i just don't like the idea of slippery elm, though it *is* safe.
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Bosley

Will Work For- Food
 
 
Barked: Mon Apr 27, '09 6:45pm PST 
I have the slippery elm powder that you mix with hot water to make a paste or gruel. Slippery elm is a very good, natural way to help with diarrhea, and soothe mucous membranes. It is also a natural detoxifier and will help the body get rid of what is causing the stomach upset. Many people who show their dogs in conformation or performance events use slippery elm as a diarrhea preventative due to stress. I feed my dogs a natural raw diet and have no problem adding natural supplements or preventatives when needed. With a minor digestive upset, I will let it run it's course (usually a day) but will add slippery elm if I think that their body needs a bit of a "boost" in it's recovery. Of course, if your dog is having more than occasional bouts with digestive problems, a trip to the vet is always advised to rule out parasites or anything more serious.
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Jessica CGC

Will work for- food
 
 
Barked: Mon Apr 27, '09 6:53pm PST 
all right i'll tell a secret. When one of my dogs was a puppy he had diarrhea all the time. i was giving him slippery elm. When i began the raw food diet, i went on the yahoo group rawfeeding for help. They told me stop all the plant-based supplements i was giving to help the diarrhea. I did, and my dog improved, but that's because he went on a raw food diet....but i figure the group must have said no plant supplements for a reason.shrug although i never found any reason that ever said slippery elm was bad for a dog.
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Bosley

Will Work For- Food
 
 
Barked: Mon Apr 27, '09 7:11pm PST 
Jessica,
Your dog most likely had stomach difficulties due to the grains in the kibble that he was eating. If your dog has a food intolerance, slippery elm will not solve that problem. When you switched to raw and eliminated the grains in the diet, his stomach issues resolved themselves, as you found out. Not everything that is plant based is bad for our dogs, it is typically grains that are the problem. Slippery elm is a natural, safe way to soothe a dog's intestinal tract when there is some sort of gastro-intestinal distress. Let's say your dog gets into the garbage or eats something nasty on walk (fairly common doggie things) and develops diarrhea. Slippery elm works very well in these situations. It also works well for stress related diarrhea. I would not give this (or any supplement) as a long term solution to a digestive problem. Long term, or frequent problems should not just have the symptoms treated, but the root of the problem should be addressed. Jessica, I think this is what you are getting at, right? Find the root of the problem first. That is perfect advise for an ongoing problem, but slippery elm can safely be used for minor, temporary intestinal problems.

Edited by author Mon Apr 27, '09 7:16pm PST

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