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Infected tick bite

This forum is for dog lovers seeking everyday advice and suggestions on health-related issues. Remember, however, that advice on a public forum simply can't be a substitute for proper medical attention. Only your vet can say assuredly what is best for your dog.

  
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Ollivander

Super Silver- Service Spoodle
 
 
Barked: Tue Dec 2, '08 1:18pm PST 
Ollie got bitten by a tick on Sunday afternoon. We removed the tick shortly after it had bitten (the tick still looked very hungry and we had only been back home an hour-ish) with the Tick Twister device, though Ollie pulled away at the last moment so it is possible the tick did get pulled out a little rougher than we would have liked. The tick was moving around and alive, it was a larger tick so I am not worried about Lyme's disease (plus it's pretty rare around here).

Today I noticed that the spot where the tick was attached has become infected, with yellow pus! The yellow pussed area is a little smaller than a dime. The area around it is red and inflamed, but I think that also might be due to the fact that he was licking it before I realized there was a problem.

We have an appointment this afternoon at 5PM at the vet, but this is a vet that I don't trust very much as my regular vet, my backup vet, and my second backup vet were all booked or not accepting patients today. I am wondering what the normal course of treatment for an infected tick bite is. The vet I am visiting at 5PM has a history of waaaaay overprescribing antibiotics and steroids, so I want to have an idea of what normal treatment might be so that I can have an informed discussion with them (they also don't take too kindly to asking questions, so I would rather come informed than ask them about every detail). I am assuming this will require a week or two of oral antibiotics?

Aside from licking it for a few minutes (what made me look there since I haven't brushed him yet today), it doesn't appear to be bothering him, and after I told him to leave it, he hasn't touched it since. So I'm glad he doesn't appear to be too bothered by it.
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Rosalita Lola "Rosie"

Love is never- being told you'- naughty!
 
 
Barked: Tue Dec 2, '08 1:46pm PST 
I think it will still be a round of antibiotics for any kind of infection. Next time (if there is one) remember to rub a little alcohol on the place where you pull out the tick and especially if you don't get out the whole tick. This happened to Rosie a little while ago - the mouthpart got stuck in. It worked it's way out with no infection.
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ZOE, ALWAYS- IN MY HEART

What- Would Cesar- Do?
 
 
Barked: Tue Dec 2, '08 4:04pm PST 
maybe it's not infected. shrugdon't you use frontline or something? we find ticks on zoe all the time, but use frontline year round and they are dead when we pick them off. then we put neosporin on it right away to avoid any infection. maybe your 2nd or 3rd back up vet ( i forget what you said) will just give you something topical.
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Ollivander

Super Silver- Service Spoodle
 
 
Barked: Tue Dec 2, '08 4:28pm PST 
Yes, I'm sure it's infected-- oozing pus is generally a sign of infection! We're headed to the vet in a few minutes, it would be nice if they went the topical route, but from the looks of it, I'm guessing they'll do oral antibiotics. Thanks for the feedback! And no, we don't put chemicals on our animals. We feed them a really good diet, keep the corners of the house dusted with diatomaceous earth, and keep a good eye out for fleas and ticks. If we see them then we do thorough combing and cleaning and removal. We do have a natural spray that we use when we visit areas that have higher risks of heartworms and lyme disease, it does a good job of keeping the bugs away, but in our local area those things are really really rare.
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ZOE, ALWAYS- IN MY HEART

What- Would Cesar- Do?
 
 
Barked: Tue Dec 2, '08 4:36pm PST 
well, good luck. we use heartgard and frontline year round going on 10 years now. better safe than sorry. but that's us, we live in heavy tick area. and mosquitos too.
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Sassy

Princess and the- Pea
 
 
Barked: Tue Dec 2, '08 6:13pm PST 
Wow, that is some serious reaction to a tick bite. I panicked when Sassy had a really red spot. Glad you are going to the vet! Usually ticks don't attach that fast and they don't even begin to feed right away when attached. You had a mean tick there.
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Beau

The sweet Lord- Jesus guides my- posts
 
 
Barked: Wed Dec 3, '08 8:58am PST 
Oh, poor Ollie. I hope they don't have to shave too much hair away from the wound and you end up with some stupid looking haircut. frown I agree with pp that it will likely need a round of antibiotics. You may wish to ask for doxycycline as that helps with most tick borne infections and should take care of a skin infection as well. We also use Frontline to keep away the ticks and it works well. Water is a "chemical" depending on how you define "chemical". Frontline is safe and works wonders to keep ticks off of my pets and we have never had to deal with any tick borne diseases or infected wounds from traumatic tick removal.
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Ollivander

Super Silver- Service Spoodle
 
 
Barked: Wed Dec 3, '08 9:12am PST 
Thanks for all the help last night guys! We went to the vet and he did prescribe doxycycline (sp?) and also gave an antibiotic shot. This is why I don't like this vet-- he just came in with the shot and started giving it without explaining what it was, why we were giving it, anything. I was fighting a panic attack at the time and so didn't interrupt to ask why we needed a shot as well as pills. Then he gave us a lecture about how we should put RAID on the ticks to kill them, and then remove them! We just wanted to leave as soon as possible, though we did insist that raid is NOT SAFE to put anywhere near a dog's skin! Ugh!

I used to use frontline and advantage, and my cat Saleen has actually now had pretty severe reactions to both frontline and advantage. I wouldn't say it's a safe chemical if you saw how sick he got. Anythign that tells you that you shouldn't touch it because it is dangerous, I don't want to put on my pets unless I absolutely have to. It's your call what you put on your own dog, but personally I am not comfortable with purposely introducing toxins unless they are absolutely necessary.
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nina

little- dog big- life
 
 
Barked: Wed Dec 3, '08 9:51am PST 
ollie, i think you will heal up pretty quick now.
i got only one tick on me all summer and that was when i went visiting in cape cod. when mommy pulled it out, it was gripping harder than any tick she's ever seen and the head broke off under my skin.
she put alchohol on it and luckily it didn't get infected, as rosie says, it worked its way out.
its been two months and i still have a little tiny spot where the hair is growing back in that mars my perfection.
we don't use contact chemicals either, just check for ticks everyday and we were lucky this summer.
that doxy.. antibiotic is very strong stuff, its used to treat lyme's.
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Beau

The sweet Lord- Jesus guides my- posts
 
 
Barked: Wed Dec 3, '08 10:42am PST 
I don't doubt that your cat had reactions to the frontline or advantage. It sounds like your cat had a pre-disposition to react negatively to those products. It doesn't make the product bad, just bad for your cat. Millions of pets use Frontline every day and don't have any reactions and it keeps them flea and tick free which means they are free from diseases and discomfort.

I was just trying to make the point that just because you call something a "chemical" doesn't make it bad. Water can be lethal if ingested in large quantities. And hydrochloric acid is extremely caustic in most situations but allows us to digest our food.

And "all natural" products are just chemicals you get from plants and "nature". The pyrethrins in the deadly Hartz products are often advertised as "natural" because they are derived from mum plants. Cyanide is "natural"... doesn't make it good for you.

To each their own. I am glad that your insect control regimines work for you.

Get better soon Ollie!!

Oh, and P.S... Doxycycline is not a "strong" antibiotic... just the appropriate one for most tick borne diseases.
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