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Eating Hair

This forum is for dog lovers seeking everyday advice and suggestions on health-related issues. Remember, however, that advice on a public forum simply can't be a substitute for proper medical attention. Only your vet can say assuredly what is best for your dog.

  
Bailey

It's a ruff life- being a dog...
 
 
Barked: Fri Dec 23, '05 12:14pm PST 
I apologize for the contnet of the question but I need help. I have long hair and Bailey LOVES to find it and eat it. I am such a neat freak constantly cleaning but you know how hair falls out. Well, with him eating the hair, he tends to have a problem with things when he goes potty and it gets "hung up" on the hair. How on earth do I get him to stop and is the hair going to hurt him?
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Logan- ♥

You say spoiled- like it's a bad- thing.
 
 
Barked: Fri Dec 23, '05 9:19pm PST 
I have the same problem with Logan and Daisy. So far, the poop being strung together has been the only problem they've had. I don't know what other issues eating hair might cause. We've tried to get them to stop, but no luck.

If you hear of anything that works, please let us know. Thanks
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Kitai

Chia Kitai!
 
 
Barked: Sat Dec 24, '05 12:14am PST 
Hey, Kitai just had a dingle berry today from the same thing!

I should add he doesn't eat hair on purpose... Mine is just long and I shed as fast as he does so I think sometimes he swallows one by accident when he's chewing on a toy on the bed or floor.
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Bailey

It's a ruff life- being a dog...
 
 
Barked: Sat Dec 24, '05 6:45am PST 
smile Thanks for the replies. I am glad to hear you have not had any health problems with this. If I find a cure, I will surely let you know! Hope you all have a good holiday and stay hangyball free for the holidays...smile
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Miso

The Divine Devil- Dog
 
 
Barked: Mon Dec 26, '05 9:29pm PST 
I have read somewhere that dogs eating hair is bad. I was trying to find that website again, but I just couldn't. I remember I was worried because my dogs did the same and I was trying to control it by cleaning more often. They don't purposely eat it, but it kinda ends up on their toys. I read that it continuously collect in their intestines and cause some harm. I'll have to find that article again. Do try to keep as little hair out of the dogs as possible, just in case. I'll keep you posted if I find it. Don't you just hate pulling the poop out of them!?!?!?!
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Miso

The Divine Devil- Dog
 
 
Barked: Mon Dec 26, '05 9:41pm PST 
Ah Ha!!!! I found something similar but not the same article. Here's what it says:

Constipation can occur in both cats and dogs, particularly as they get older. Constipation occurs when defecation becomes difficult or is absent. When feces stays in the intestines longer than is necessary, too much moisture is absorbed from the stools, causing them to become dry and hard. This makes the stools difficult to expel. As a result, your dog or cat will strain to defecate and may not have a bowel movement for several days. If this condition goes untreated, the lower bowels may eventually become severely and irreversibly stretched, causing them to lose their ability to expel feces.This condition is known as "megacolon".

There are several possible reasons for constipation. Diet appears to play a significant role. For example, when a cat or dog swallows foreign materials such as hair, bones, garbage, cloth or rocks, it can lead to constipation. Prolonged lack of exercise, a change in surroundings, or a change in daily routine (i.e. stress) can lead to constipation problems as well. In these cases, pets may become reluctant to relieve themselves and become constipated. Some medical problems such as infected anal glands or a fractured hip can cause painful defecation and result in constipation. Some pets may have an intestinal obstruction or a nerve or muscle disorder.

How can constipation be prevented? Regular grooming will prevent excessive hair ingestion and regular exercise will encourage bowel regularity. A newly formulated hairball prevention diet that is commercially available dissolves hair ingested via daily grooming and is available through your veterinarian. Access to a frequently-cleaned litter box (in dogs, frequent opportunities to defecate) is important. Lubricant laxatives can also be effective. These usually contain a combination of mineral oil and/or petrolatum along with a flavour base. They soften and lubricate feces and thereby make it easier to expel. Nutritionally pets should avoid bones, have access to fresh water at all times, and be fed a high fibre diet.Your veterinarian can advise you which steps are best suited for your pet.

Here's the url:

http://www.animalhealthcare.ca/contents/content.asp?get=faq& id=48&category=Cats
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Miso

The Divine Devil- Dog
 
 
Barked: Mon Dec 26, '05 9:48pm PST 
I know I just posted that information. I also found some really useful information here too:

http://www.balgownievet.com.au/1_com_foreign_bodies.htm

Hope this helps
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