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Adopting a deaf/blind dog into a family w children..

If you are wondering what is the right dog for you, this is the place to be. In this introductory forum we talk about topics such as breed vs. mix, size, age, grooming, breeders, shelters, rescues as well as requirements for exercise, space and care. No question is too silly here. This particular forum is for getting and giving helpful, nice advice. It is definitely not a forum for criticizing someone else's opinion, knowledge or advice. This forum is all about tail wagging and learning.

  
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Trigger

*Blackdog*
 
 
Barked: Fri Feb 17, '12 1:41pm PST 
http://forum.horsetopia.com/dogs/141665-questions-lethal-white-aussi es.html

Hopefully this is ok to post here. Admin feel free to remove if it's not. I just didn't want anyone feeling like I misrepresented anything. I surely didn't think I was anyway but perhaps the other poster would prefer letting others make up their own minds?
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Member Since
02/17/2012
 
 
Barked: Fri Feb 17, '12 2:08pm PST 
Someone had posted regarding vibrating collars. In researching the dog's issues , the vibrating collar was noted as a good tool. Has anyone used one with good results before? I have only known shock collars that have a vibrating function. Which are not good to begin with. Can a vibration collar be placed at any location on the neck?
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Dr. Watson

Not a wiener- dawg!
 
 
Barked: Fri Feb 17, '12 2:22pm PST 
How to make your own Vibrating Collar!



Vibrating Collars -- more info
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Trigger

*Blackdog*
 
 
Barked: Fri Feb 17, '12 2:24pm PST 
(Guest and I sorted this out off board, if mods want to delete what I can no longer edit that would be great.)

Try posting about vibrating collars down in the behavior and training forum, you'll get far more responses. Just specify vibrating and not merely electronic training collars or youre bound to get a whole bunch of replies you're not after lol

Edited by author Thu Mar 1, '12 8:35am PST

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Yoshi

XD
 
 
Barked: Fri Feb 17, '12 2:52pm PST 
As a blind person who has had to overcome many challenges in her life, I find it slightly disheartening that some of you think this will not work. frown This just illustrates how little compassion some people have for the disabled. frown Every blind/disabled human/animal deserves a chance to succeed. In 2 weeks, I will be performing in a fund raising gala for an organization called Cherish. They work to integrate developmentally delayed children into society. I just spoke at the press conference this morning to appeal for donations. One thing that I stressed was that parents should not give up on their children, and neither should the world. I don't see how dogs are different. confused

Guest, hats off to you and your family for being so kind and compassionate and so willing to take on this challenge. This will be a great learning experience for your entire family, especially your daughter. By learning to communicate with a disabled pet, it will help her communicate with disabled people. Please disregard everyone who says it won't work. In case some people are as dumb as a rock and have not heard of Helen Keller, she was both blind and deaf and she became a very successful woman. Look her up if you haven't heard of her.

Guest, if you have any questions about blindness, please feel free to pmail me. smile
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Lenny

Lenny -The- Wrecking Ball
 
 
Barked: Fri Feb 17, '12 10:17pm PST 
Yoshi, I don't think any of the responses saying the situation may not be the best match are from lack of compassion. I agree that any being, human or canine or otherwise, deserves to know love and compassion. That whether young or old, in perfect health or with challenges weather it be missing a limb or being blind or deaf, that they deserve those things. It is no secret that blind or deaf, it doesn't stop a person from achieving great things and it certainly can't stop a dog from living a happy fulfilled life either.

Many people try to act out of compassion and take on challenges that are just too much. I think those responses were merely out of what will be best in respect to the relationship between the puppy that up and the children. Dealing with the dog being comfortable in an environment where they navigate without their hearing or sight, and the children being safe. Not to say the dog would react in such a way, and not to say the children might be wonderful around the dog. But it is something that should be considered, and I don't think that notion is coming from a bad place.
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Bunny

Black dogs rock!
 
 
Barked: Sat Feb 18, '12 7:51am PST 
Yoshi, I wanted to say pretty much what Lenny did. I don't think anyone said a deaf/blind dog shouldn't be adopted. We were concerned that it might not work in this particular situation. I don't know the person in question ( now guest) , so I can't speak to whether it would work specifically for them or not. I do know that I raised a puppy and a baby and would not to recommend that to anyone. In my case, the dog wound up not having a good of life as he should have had, because I did not know then what I know now. I am sure that puppies and/or dogs with challenges can be raised with young children if the parents are committed to it. It is my experience that a majority of people are not and that is how I wound up with Bunny. That said, there are always exceptionssmile
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Yoshi

XD
 
 
Barked: Sat Feb 18, '12 9:43am PST 
OK, I see where you're coming from, but some things in life you just cannot predict. I'm sure Helen Keller's family were not prepared to raise a deaf and blind child. The thought probably never crossed their mind, but they did, and they did a good job of it too, of course with the help of Annie Sullivan. smile I think it's better to make an attempt before saying it can't work, but that's just me. The school for the blind, despite their lack of training did have a wonderful motto, the impossible is only the untried. XD

Bunny, thanks for your pmail. I just replied. smile
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Titus

Cave canis- vigilo omnis
 
 
Barked: Sat Feb 18, '12 1:16pm PST 
With all due respect, dogs aren't people. Inviting a 40(ish) lb deaf carnivore into a home with young children takes an extraordinary amount of commitment and experience. If the subject of the OP is prepared to take on such a responsibility, then dog bless her. If not, best to pass on this dog and find one more suitable as a family pet.

All dogs deserve a a loving home, but dogs need more than love, and not everyone is prepared to deal with one that has special needs... "Trying it out" might be fine, but what if it doesn't work out? Special needs dogs tend to spend a lot of time getting bounced from home to home by well-intentioned but ill-prepared owners.
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Dr. Watson

Not a wiener- dawg!
 
 
Barked: Sat Feb 18, '12 1:27pm PST 
Another consideration is the breed or breed mix of the pup.thinking An Aussie would tend to be nippy, generally not something you want around a toddler. My deaf Dal, OTOH, was not very mouthy.
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