GO!

Greyhounds...

If you are wondering what is the right dog for you, this is the place to be. In this introductory forum we talk about topics such as breed vs. mix, size, age, grooming, breeders, shelters, rescues as well as requirements for exercise, space and care. No question is too silly here. This particular forum is for getting and giving helpful, nice advice. It is definitely not a forum for criticizing someone else's opinion, knowledge or advice. This forum is all about tail wagging and learning.

  
(Page 1 of 2: Viewing entries 1 to 10)  
Page Links: 1  2  
Lenny

Sleep Your Way- Out Of Trouble
 
 
Barked: Mon Oct 30, '06 2:59pm PST 
...another misunderstood breed. In the UK alone aproximatly 20000 Greyhounds "disapear" every year when their racing career is over. Why? There simply aren't enough homes for them all. Although the situation has shown slight improvements over the past couple of years, people still seems to be under the impression Greyhounds need a lot of exercise and will chase everything in sight. I have had a lot of experience with the breed and work full time for a local rescue, here's what I've learn't about these magical dogs:

TEMPERAMENT:
One of the Greyhound's best aspects. In general Greyhounds are very docile, placid natured dogs, they love nothing more than to share a cuddle with you on the sofa in the evenings. I have found them to be VERY torrerant, esp where children are concerned and have never met one with agression issues

EXERCISE:
This is where people misunderstand these dogs. What people don't realise is that Greyhounds are "sprinters" meaning a quik 5min tear around the garden is pleanty of running time for them. Most Greyhounds will need a total of 20-40mins exercise a day...that's less than a toy breed! Greys are well known as brilliant lead walkers...unfortunatly, they are also well known to be not so good off it so unless you're willing to be patient and work at the recall training (wich isn't as impossible as some people will tell you), an enclosed area is essential for free running.

GROOMING:
Another great aspect of the Greyhound. Grey's have very short fur and don't moult much. They are oder free and have a "non-stick" coat (meaning they'll come back from a wet groggy walk virtually spotless). The only grooming required is a quick once over with a hound glove every so often. As well as having thin fur, Greys also have thin skin which can tear easily so watch out for that. They will need a coat in the winter months.

FEEDING:
Dispite their size Greyhounds don't need a lot of food and aren't usually fussy eaters, most being used to a kennel diet.

HEATH:
Though large dogs, Greyhounds as well known for being pretty much problem free in the health department, they have a life expectancy of about 12yrs, though many have been known to live much longer

THE DREADED "CHASE INSTINCT":
Now this is what puts most people off. In actual fact most Greyhounds aren't too bad. Even many ex racers can be trainined pretty quickly to live with cats...I've even seen some live quite happily with house rabbits! Occasionally you will find the odd one which is too far gone, and these are usually not too good with small dogs either, though this is a minority and any good rescue group will warn you about this. This is not a reflection however on their nature around people.

Bad points:
Pretty much the only bad thing Greyhound owners have to say is that they're thiefs! No longer will you have to worry about flies landing on your dinner when you've nipped to the loo...your Greyhound will take care of that!

Edited by author Fri Jan 5, '07 8:26am PST

[notify]
Kelpie

Foxy girl!
 
 
Barked: Tue Oct 31, '06 12:25pm PST 
Mom and I see greyhounds at the dogpark and they're all super sweet. And beautiful! I even played chase with some greyhounds once! Mom was worried they'd think I was a rabbit, but they were gentle with me. That was a real work out, though! I'm not used to running with dogs who are faster then I am, 'cause there aren't very many. BOL!
[notify]
Mingus, CGC,- R3GL

www.phetched.com
 
 
Barked: Tue Oct 31, '06 3:41pm PST 
Great post! Maybe it will help to get more retired greyhounds rescued!

My mom loves, loves, LOVES greyhounds. When it's time for her to get me a brother or sister, a greyhound (rescued, of course!) is right up there at the top of her list.

P.S. Hey, Kelpie!
[notify]

Shiloh

Opt to Adopt!!
 
 
Barked: Tue Oct 31, '06 3:56pm PST 
Great post.

My cousin has a retired racer and everything you say is true. She is the sweetest, gentlest dog I've ever seen. She loves everybody and after a few laps around their yard she's ready for some serious lounging.
[notify]
Mutts

Duh
 
 
Barked: Fri Nov 3, '06 12:51pm PST 
Great post mutts is a greyhound sharpie and god knows what else cross I love the bredd thre beutifull dogs
[notify]
Onyx

Happy in my- forever home!
 
 
Barked: Fri Nov 3, '06 1:10pm PST 
Great post! There are a lot of Greyhounds in need of rescuing in my community due to racing facilities nearby. They really are remarkably gentle dogs.

As you said, they are sprinters, and people often misunderstand their level of endurance. Many attempt to over-exercise their Greyhounds because they don't understand this.

Also, if you are adopting a rescue Greyhound, another thing to know is that these retired racers don't require a lot of space. I've known many of them to make great apartment dogs, as they've never known more room than their restrictive kennels before. Some people think that they can't consider adopting them because they don't have a huge house for these big guys.

One problem some encounter when adopting a retired racer is potty training issues. Housebreaking just isn't a priority on the racing circuit and sometimes you have to start from scratch in that department.

So many of these amazing retired racers are put down just because they no longer have a job to do. It's so sad.
[notify]
Rusty

I've got the- LIFE!!!!
 
 
Barked: Fri Nov 3, '06 1:29pm PST 
My husband and I did a lot of research before deciding that a greyhound was going to be our first dog. I can't get over how well behaved Rusty has been from the very beginning. Even though he hadn't lived in house for very long before he came to us, he had impecable house manners. Housebreaking was not a problem at all. After one accident he understood that our entire house was his kennel and boy, was he happy about that. We've only had him for two months and I'm so excited to see his personality emerging.
[notify]
Rusty

I've got the- LIFE!!!!
 
 
Barked: Fri Nov 3, '06 1:29pm PST 
My husband and I did a lot of research before deciding that a greyhound was going to be our first dog. I can't get over how well behaved Rusty has been from the very beginning. Even though he hadn't lived in house for very long before he came to us, he had impecable house manners. Housebreaking was not a problem at all. After one accident he understood that our entire house was his kennel and boy, was he happy about that. We've only had him for two months and I'm so excited to see his personality emerging.
[notify]
Vance CGC

You kids g'off- my lawn!
 
 
Barked: Fri Nov 3, '06 2:24pm PST 
I think it may be important to consider the difference between buying a Greyhound from a breeder, and rescuing an ex-racer. Maybe someone with more experiance in the breed can go more in-depth, because I've only met one breeder-bought Grey. It was like a bouncy little gazelle, running and chasing and getting into everything - and I hear that on average, that's how they are.

Whereas ex-racers do tend to be pretty docile, lazy and loving. However, they may also need a lot of help adjusting to life away from a race track. A track shut down here two years ago, and there were an estimated 200 - 400 Greys that suddenly needed homes. People - with good intentions, I'm certain - sprang into action, attempting to convince everyone in New England that Greyhounds were the absolute perfect dog, ever. The same article that talked about how laid-back and lazy they were would then discuss what excellent distance jogging compainions they made. Well, working in a training facility, about 2 months after the dogs were mostly placed the phone calls started: One new Grey wouldn't walk on lineloum, another kept running through screen doors, one kept running away, many wouldn't sit... and "No one ever told us it would be like this!"

Of course you can get through all that and come out with an incredible dog, there may be some hard work involved. I do know one ex-racer in particular who's simply amaizing... He hates to fight, but is one of the most dominant dogs I've ever met. He's fully off-leash trained and Delta certified as a therapy dog. He's one of Vance's best friends. And yes, he's a horrible food theif... He can and will open almost anything to get at food.

As for health concerns... Their skin is paper thin, and it just rips. If they're going to be playing with other dogs or something on a regular basis, you might want to consider that. I've never really seen it to a point of needing stitches, but I know a lot of people nearly pass out over having to deal with something like that.
[notify]
Pancho- Lopez-In- Memoriam

i must break you
 
 
Barked: Fri Nov 3, '06 11:04pm PST 
no rescue dog is perfect, as you know, all have problems and the fault in that situation lies with the irresponsible people who were so desperate to find homes for them that they eliminated or outright lied about details. that is a real no no and has nothing to do with those poor dogs. greyhounds are indeed delicate and special dogs, and hopefully are placed with responsible rescuers who will above all be honest with the potential adopters to give those poor souls the best chance they have on this earth of a good end to their life.
[notify]
  (Page 1 of 2: Viewing entries 1 to 10)  
Page Links: 1  2