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Want a Bullmastiff but will he get along with our little ones

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Bella and- Abby

1088765
 
 
Barked: Mon Jan 11, '10 7:09pm PST 
Hello all, any and all input will be appreciated.

We have a dilemma. We have determined that we would love to add a Bullmastiff to our family. We actually rescued a beautiful 2 year old brindle female on New Years Eve and that is where our problem starts. We took our4 year old Maltese female and 2 year old Pug female to meet the BM at the rescue and things went pretty well. We all agreed that it looked liked the relationship would work so we brought her home. For seven days, it was a PERFECT union. We supervised the dogs of course but things were going really well. The BM and Pug seemed inseperable. They played together at every opportunity and it was usually the BM initiating the play. Then, on the eighth morning the unthinkable happened. With no warning the BM turned on the Pug and really tore her up. The BM refused to release, I had to phyically pry her jaws open to free the Pug. At no time did she show any aggression towards me but for the rest of that day, she continually growled anytime the Maltese was in sight of the BM's kennel (the Pug was at the vet). We were of course distraught that our Pug was seriously injured (even though she will recover), but I am also disappointed that we could not keep the BM. I returned her to the rescue that night.

We really love the BM breed and I desperately would love to get a male puppy so that we could start from scratch and so here's the delimma. As badly as a want one and as much as I can appreciate all the goodness they possess, we are not willing to jeopardize our two small dogs well-being. How assured can we be that a properly socialized, trained, and neutered BM male will accept and live peacefully with our two spayed females. I understand that any breed is capable of fighting any other, but is it common for a male to fight smaller females that it has been raised with?
Again, any input would be appreciated.
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Zeus

The ledgend- lives on.
 
 
Barked: Sat Jan 16, '10 12:16pm PST 
It's a hard call.

Even when properly socialized and brought up with your little ones, there still is a potential. They are a breed that was bred to be dog-aggressive, as it was part of their job not only to hold a poacher, but to take care of his dog, too.

I have a neutered male who I don't easily trust with large dogs of either sex or small male dogs, but seems to do well with smaller female dogs. He was raised with smaller dogs of both sexes, also. My female, who was raised with Zeus only and no other dogs is an absolute dream with any walking, breathing animal or person.

In my opinion, with this breed, part is nuture and part is nature -- and you roll the dice and hope you come up with winning numbers, but at the same time you have to do what you are doing, which is first be the advocate for the dogs you already own -- and second, think about the potential puppy's life and what you might do and how it would change everybody if something were to go awry.

Feel free to p-mail me anytime. I've been in the breed for about 5 years, and am going on my third Bullmastiff. I've been a member of the ABA for about two years now, and if you ever need, have plenty of breeder friends and contacts should you need them.

Best of luck to you and your little ones! big grin
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Bella and- Abby

1088765
 
 
Barked: Mon Jan 18, '10 12:33pm PST 
Thanks for the info. I think we have reached a decision. As much as we loved the rescue BM and as much as we enjoy hearing of other peoples exploits with their BM's, we have decided to look at other breeds, at least for now. The one breed that we really feel a lot more comfortable with is the Newfoundland. It is still a very large breed with protective instincts but by most accounts is much more dog friendly. I guess he will get a lot of use out of our pool and pond!

I am still determined to have a Bullmastiff one day. I have never gotten as attached to a dog as I did in seven days with that rescue. I still pray that she goes to a good home. The attack is just a little too fresh in our minds right now and I couldn't live with my myself if I knowingly put our other two in danger.

Thanks again for your help, have a great New Year!
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Zeus

The ledgend- lives on.
 
 
Barked: Mon Jan 18, '10 3:28pm PST 
I'd encourage you to look into English Mastiffs, too.

They're like the Bullmastiffs -- but without near the drive and aggressive tendancies -- just all around tend to be more temperamentally predictable. Some prefer them, because they tend not to be as independent as BMFs. The other vet tech at our clinic has English Mastiffs -- and her dogs are far more needy than mine, which she likes and I don't. (Hence why she keeps getting EMs and I keep getting BMFs.) She also has other small dogs, cats and other random small animals around the house. I myself also enjoy a good challenge, whereas she would just rather have things fall into place.

And I understand -- once you have a Bullmastiff you'll never go back. Our Zeus just turned 5 on December 28th and was diagnosed with cutaneous lymposarcoma in early December. Despite their sometimes short lifespans and the early heartbreak they can inflict on us, it could never shadow over the love, joy, companionship, loyalty and protection they bring to our lives -- and we'll never go a day without one again in our lives.

hug
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Bella and- Abby

1088765
 
 
Barked: Mon Jan 18, '10 6:31pm PST 
So sorry to hear that Zeus is sick, I'll say a prayer for him.

We did look at the English Mastiffs and that is also a possibility, if I can get DeEtte to overcome the "Mastiff" stigma. She is a born dog lover, and is really trying not to villainize all large protective breeds, but the trauma of seeing her "baby" injured is hard to forget. Just today we were at the vet to have another drain tube inserted and we saw a couple with a two year old English Bulldog. He was a BEAUTIFUL dog and extremely friendly and outgoing. He was also extremely dog aggressive, go figure...
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