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Socializing puppies when there is a risk of disease

This is a place to gain some understanding of dog behavior and to assist people in training their dogs and dealing with common behavior problems, regardless of the method(s) used. This can cover the spectrum from non-aversive to traditional methods of dog training. There are many ways to train a dog. Please avoid aggressive responses, and counter ideas and opinions with which you don't agree with friendly and helpful advice. Please refrain from submitting posts that promote off-topic discussions. Keep in mind that you may be receiving advice from other dog owners and lovers... not professionals. If you have a major problem, always seek the advice of a trainer or behaviorist!

  
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Addy, CGC

Let's go for a- walk!
 
 
Barked: Sun Jun 16, '13 8:58pm PST 
Nine weeks is too young for trips to Petco and Petsmart--but as Tiller says, it's too young for a puppy to leave mama for a new home. I know some disagree, and I'm old enough to remember when puppies often went home at six weeks--but we know a lot more about canine development now.

I am amazed that Daphne thinks it's appropriate to tell people they don't care about their dogs because they make different decisions than she does.

And yet she has apparently brought her new puppy home at eight weeks, despite the large and mounting body of evidence that twelve weeks is better for the puppy's development.

The puppy would also have had two rounds of puppy shots by then.

I'm sure that, as a medical professional, Daphne's mom knows that only one of the three sets of puppy shots is effective--the first set after the immunity from the mom drops sufficiently. They get three rounds of shots to minimize the time they spend without either form of protection--but odds are it will be the second round.
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Nare

Woo-woo- whineybutt
 
 
Barked: Sun Jun 16, '13 9:27pm PST 
I, myself, wouldn't advise other people to take their puppies out so young. Do as I say, not as I do. Nare and Arkane are happy and healthy, we may have been the one in a million who dodged the bullet but.. Oh well. The next pup is coming from a breeder who keeps them until they're 12 weeks old so I guess they won't have to go through the agony and horror of early exposure.

Honestly every time you step outside your door, you're taking risks and chances. Your dog can slip out of his collar, you can drop the leash.. and he runs into traffic and its too late. An off leash dog can attack and kill yours.. Hell, your dog can choke on his own kibble. If we worry about all of these things, and are essentially scared of nature itself, then what quality of life is there? In some cases, yes disease is preventable, but there is foreign bacteria.. viruses.. diseases.. everywhere and you cant stop that.

Granted, I've never faced a situation like OP's. I've never had one of my animals die yet. Maybe I'm just too young. I'm sure if I encountered something like OP, I might feel a bit defensive, but I guess then is too late.

Edit:
I would also like to say I take my dog's health /very/ seriously. However it is pointless for me to prance around trying to avoid the inevitable.

Edited by author Sun Jun 16, '13 9:32pm PST

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Sabi

When the night- closes in I will- be there
 
 
Barked: Sun Jun 16, '13 10:04pm PST 
I wouldn't keep a pup confined until 4 months old but, I do live in a high risk parvo area, so I see nothing wrong with keeping them safe until at least the second vaccs. But it depends on the year and the season around here, and I have access to a pool of healthy dogs with responsible owners.

I do agree that the approach may be ineffective. But having lost pups to viruses and infections, and having watched my beloved Freeway survive parvo, I understand the sentiment all to well.
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Tiller- (Skansen's- Ira in the M

I DO Exist...To- Drive You Batty
 
 
Barked: Sun Jun 16, '13 11:12pm PST 
That's the point I don't get at ALL. If this is such a large concern, take the puppy at a later (and many would say more appropriate) age. Why take them early, away from the socialization of their litter (which is the optimum) in order to have them in an environment where there must be some restrictions? Why not just take them later shrug I do, and then don't have to restrict at all. If these things concern you so, you could just have the puppy titered.

And I have to correct, as regards the following....."When a mother is feeding her puppies there is a secretion of Colorstrum in the milk. The Colorstrum is full of antibodies for the pups which fights off disease. Once the pups are weaned from their mother the Colostrum level decreases which in turn increases risk of disease to the puppies. Even when there is still even a slight amount of Colostrum in the pup's body systems after weaning this will decrease their 1st set of vaccinations to prevent disease."

This is NOT accurate. And honestly, OP, for all your storming about people being responsible and that they should know better, it is ironic to me as a past breeder that you do not know the following yourself :

Colostrum is availed in first milk, and it is only through the first couple of days that this can be absorbed. Not only from the dam side (when this can be absorbed), but on the puppy side....were in a few weeks the pup to be placed on another new mom for more antibodies, he would be unable to absorb them. There is no continuous supply of colostrum through mother's milk. It's like a power shot in the beginning, when the puppy's system will absorb the antibodies. These slowly taper, leaving a dangerous window where the antibodies are not strong enough to protect the puppy any longer, and yet are strong enough to conquer the vaccine. Having a mother-to-be's titers tested before whelp can often be an indicator how strong their initial immunity will be, and provide at least a gauge as to when first immunizations are advisable.

Puppies ON a mother are still potentially vulnerable unless her titers were high.
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Toto, CD, RN, CGC

We don't do- doodles!!!
 
 
Barked: Mon Jun 17, '13 4:30am PST 
Daphne and Samantha have left the building.
I am with Nare... how do I know my baby puppy (or adult dog!) isn't going to die from ANYTHING??? My friends totally isolated young puppy died from suffocation by sticking her head in a potato chip bag. Keeping them in a cotton bubble surely isn't going to do much for their socialization.
AND, I am also a believer in developing a better immune system by challenging it somewhat... a totally isolated puppy isn't going to have natural immunity to ANYTHING, anything which may be a simple cough in a pup with a normally developed immune system but which can be extremely serious in a pup whose immune system has never been challenged.
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Addy, CGC

Let's go for a- walk!
 
 
Barked: Mon Jun 17, '13 6:53am PST 
Nine weeks is too young for trips to Petco and Petsmart--but as Tiller says, it's too young for a puppy to leave mama for a new home. I know some disagree, and I'm old enough to remember when puppies often went home at six weeks--but we know a lot more about canine development now.

I am amazed that Daphne thinks it's appropriate to tell people they don't care about their dogs because they make different decisions than she does.

And yet she has apparently brought her new puppy home at eight weeks, despite the large and mounting body of evidence that twelve weeks is better for the puppy's development.

The puppy would also have had two rounds of puppy shots by then.

I'm sure that, as a medical professional, Daphne's mom knows that only one of the three sets of puppy shots is effective--the first set after the immunity from the mom drops sufficiently. They get three rounds of shots to minimize the time they spend without either form of protection--but odds are it will be the second round.
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Tiller- (Skansen's- Ira in the M

I DO Exist...To- Drive You Batty
 
 
Barked: Mon Jun 17, '13 9:26am PST 
I am also questioning such a taut response to the unknown is all that good for the puppy either (mentally). I am totally with Toto that a strong immune system is the best protection. If you shield too much, restrict environments too much, you aren't really encouraging that.

I think we all know well enough that pups are vulnerable until their complete series, but after that seeking to protect them is very hard to support.

Edited by author Mon Jun 17, '13 9:26am PST

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