GO!

Maybe we aren't the right home for her :-(

This is a place to gain some understanding of dog behavior and to assist people in training their dogs and dealing with common behavior problems, regardless of the method(s) used. This can cover the spectrum from non-aversive to traditional methods of dog training. There are many ways to train a dog. Please avoid aggressive responses, and counter ideas and opinions with which you don't agree with friendly and helpful advice. Please refrain from submitting posts that promote off-topic discussions. Keep in mind that you may be receiving advice from other dog owners and lovers... not professionals. If you have a major problem, always seek the advice of a trainer or behaviorist!

  
(Page 7 of 9: Viewing entries 61 to 70)  
1  2  3  4  5  6  7  8  9  
Sabi

When the night- closes in I will- be there
 
 
Barked: Sat Feb 9, '13 1:24pm PST 
This doesn't sound like SA. It really doesn't. It sounds like just an adjustment phase. She has found something good and fears it might go away. I leave the weather channel on for the dogs sometimes, or one of the kids channels. The human voices seem to comfort them.
Glad she's getting better anyway, hope it continues.
[notify]
Shiver Me- Timbers- "Charlie"

My Little Dog, a- heartbeat at my- feet.<3
 
 
Barked: Sat Feb 9, '13 3:24pm PST 
I have to agree with Sabi. It sounds more like she's still adjusting, maybe a little bored, and possibly a little lonely, but it doesn't sound like separation anxiety if she's settling down and taking naps. A few minutes of whining here and there is likely her trying to get you to come back and let her out, before she realizes you're not there and goes back to sleep.

Have you tried frozen raw bones when you leave her there? They can take longer than a Kong with peanut butter - or have you tried stuffing and freezing the Kong?

I've had fosters with separation anxiety. Some would vomit, pee and defecate in their crates when the person left them, would cry the whole time and try to get out. Others just cried, barked and tried to bust out the whole time(whether it was five minutes, or five hours, literally the WHOLE time). They may have been slightly more severe forms of SA, but they were true SA. One dog would chew at and paw at his crate and hurt himself in the process because he couldn't settle down.

Josie doesn't sound like an SA dog. She sounds like she's taking the time to adjust, bored and a little lonely at first, wondering if you're going to return. Have you tried playing crate games with her? You can find good videos for crate games on Youtube - they can sometimes help a dog to adjust to you leaving and getting used to the crate more so they get more comfortable.

With the improvement she's having with the extra time - it definitely suggests adjustment period. She should settle down with a little more time. She sounds like an otherwise happy, sweet dog.

I'm glad you're trying to take the extra time and even considering trying to foster her.
[notify]
Tiller- (Skansen's- Ira in the M

I DO Exist...To- Drive You Batty
 
 
Barked: Sat Feb 9, '13 4:05pm PST 
Pup has SA....I rated 3 on the scale of 10. I had an opportunity to watch a cam for several hours. She was a little uncomfortable to watch, too stressed to do much of anything, but comfortable about the crate, down most of the time, and no extreme behavior. Just more "I will hold my (emotional) breath" until mom comes home. The greeting was good, not pent up.

A big problem here IMO is the unsupportive rescue, who allowed OP to feel alone and panic. I think if support had been there from the first and she had had a little coaching, things wouldn't seem as pressured as they do.

To the OP, if Josie actually managed to sleep, then that is *superb* progress from where I saw her, and that, on your report, was solid improvement from where she was originally. No reason to think she will not head forward, particularly with tweaks here or there as to things that can work.

In terms of reading books, that's ok, but that is only going to panic you. SA is *extremely* difficult to "cure." Conditioning and management strategies can make for great improvements, but in terms of behaviors this one is a loo loo given that the behavior occurs when you are absent. Far easier, IMO and experience, to deal with aggressive or fear responses than SA, if only because you can address the behavior presently. Some dogs aren't particularly cureable from SA. The GSD I had in as a foster wasn't. There was nothing to work on....she was an angel as long as you were there. She was a master and breaking out of crates. No crate could hold her. She was very athletic and gating her wasn't going to work, either. No problem being with either containment when you were there. It was impossible, but I found a perfect home...a retiree smile

At any rate, you are looking at a moderate case, and that is *not* what a lot of these texts are addressing. And more to the point, she continues to progress with decisive steps, not the itty bitty almost imperceptible little ones. All good. Odds are she is a 1 or 2 on the scale, and the rest is about adjustment periods in terms of what you are seeing.

As for your big concern, regression, what you need to do is foundational stuff. Don't have a routine. Now this opposite to what I normally advise when it comes to settling a dog in, and maybe you start a little later with this protocol for that reason, but if your schedule is irregular, then you need to condition her properly. Don't feed at the same time, or walk, etc., every day. Mix it up. This way, she is more conditioned to accepting variations in routine and not being insecure. Figure out WHERE in your schedule you are close to guaranteed normalcy, and try to focus there. My dogs I vary routine with save for nighttime ritual, in example. Dogs need to be able to predict things in their environment, but when you move away from being too regimented, that makes them more adaptable and less prone to neurosis.
[notify]

Josie

1284059
 
 
Barked: Sat Feb 9, '13 4:34pm PST 
Interesting Tiller! I was nervous today because the whole 2 weeks I've had her our morning routine has been the same except for one day, and that one day she peed in the house for the first time (7 days in). So this morning the routine was different and apparently she did good (because my boyfriend was here with her, but he was sleeping).

It may be a good thing, like someone said, that our schedules are so random. Any time we are forced to crate and leave, she might be in there 20 minutes or 4 hours, who knows.

Kong: I have tried freezing it and will again. So far though she just gives up on it when she realizes she is alone. If we leave treats in there she will not eat them until we come home. Then she goes to find the kong to finish it (which I don't allow).

Tiller do you suggest crate games? One person told me to do what I did when I was crate training puppies: leave her alone for a minute, come back and treat and play. Repeat over and over with varying lengths of alone time. I have just been focusing on staying calm and cool when I return.

Tiller regarding the retiree who took the GSD, I wonder how he ever managed to go to the store or do other things? Did you keep in touch?
[notify]
Tiller- (Skansen's- Ira in the M

I DO Exist...To- Drive You Batty
 
 
Barked: Sat Feb 9, '13 5:28pm PST 
I don't think crate games. Crates aren't her problem, which would be the main application of that in a behavioral sense. You want her to chill in there, that would be the main point, and hopefully at some point she does so enough to advantage puzzle toys, etc. You want to diminish that stress of expectation in her crate, as it doesn't seem to be the crate that bugs her.

Also, in terms of some here who say "it may not be SA." They also could perfectly be right, and this may dissipate. Do you know her background? Some dogs take time to earn trust that they will not be abandoned. I have had fosters here that are highly stressed in their crates the first week. My English Setter foster, I tried it the first night and that's the last time she's been in a crate. It really stressed her badly, and she had enough problems (had been quilled, and the breed is generally very sensitive and doesn't transfer well). At any rate, nowadays when my Maltese foster gets his out times, she actually crams herself in there laugh out loud So it wasn't that the crate bothered her, but that she was locked away.

I think the classical music in the background is excellent. They also have dog specific CDs. I am not sure how well they work....someone here may...but it can be a good cue for her and may help her relax. It is not surprising to me she doesn't touch anything until you are home. As I said, off her behavior she is more "holding her emotional breath" until you get home. Pretty consistent with how she is behaving waiting for you. That's all she's doing....waiting....so if she actually slept for a half hour today, that is quite a big stride.

I also recommend putting her in her crate and just sit with her from time to time, or just be in the room puttering, etc. You had right instincts to not rush to her crate when you came home. If crate always = I am leaving now, progress will be slower. If it's somewhere she goes more generally and sometimes has the pleasure of your company, that can help, too.

Also, if you can get a fuzzy squeaky toy of some decent size, play with her with it so both your scents are on it and leave it in there with her. That can be a comfort.

Just play around with similar concepts, but be grateful that what you do not seem to struggle with is a dislike of the crate. That part seemed not to bother her. When my GSD was a puppy he actually scratched his cornea trying to get out shock

For that GSD adopter, he was married and had a wife who did most errands. They were made aware she couldn't be left alone, and also had a dog loving adult child should they need to go away. I did keep in touch, and he was just enthralled with her. She had the most model behavior unless left alone, and their life was in a place where it was easy for them to work around. He was a homebody, they lived two blocks from a dog park so that was daily jaunt. So he was in paradise smile Didn't hurt that she was this majestic beauty with super sociability and behavior. I am sure all his neighbors thought he was the luckiest adopter in the world. Little did they know laugh out loud I'd come home and she literally be there with a torn apart crate, she standing on a table...literally!!!....having entirely cleared it off, and with a huge pile of my clothes all gathered in a bunch.
[notify]
Tyler

Whippy- The- Whipador
 
 
Barked: Sat Feb 9, '13 5:54pm PST 
Josie, Ty is similar to the GSD Tiller is describing. If i go food shopping or have to do basic errands, Ty has to either come or be looked after by family members.

I've also found with Ty that confining him makes him 100x worse! He hated the crate as a puppy and when we've tried leaving him shut in a room or something he's caused damage in his attempts to escape. The worst episode was when we left him alone in the kitchen of a holiday home we was staying at. We thought he'd be better shut in there and seen as the house was detached we wasn't worried about him making a noise as such. We returned a few hours later to find Tyler in a complete state, almost manic and the bottom of the door had been scratched so badly that there was quite obvious damage. Wood from the door was everywhere, even over the kitchen table! and not only that but Ty's paws had been bleeding and there was blood over the floor and table too cry That was a one off and he's never been that distressed before or after and he does seem to have improved a bit over the years on his own accord.

But yep. SA sure does suck! But don't think ALL cases of SA are like that because they're not and i don't want to scare you into thinking that will be the case with Josie!
[notify]
Smokey

Let's play tug!!
 
 
Barked: Sat Feb 9, '13 6:37pm PST 
I can highly recommend the album Classical Music For Dogs. I've played Smokey other classical music, but those specific songs are incredibly well selected for calming. He pretty much instantly goes to sleep. I downloaded it from amazon cloud player. I can't recall offhand whether you can download the individual songs to make it cheaper, but if not you could prob look at the song titles and just find another slow tempo version of one or two songs. Dogs don't seem to get annoyed by listening to the same song for three hours. People also say good things about through a dog's ear.
[notify]
Josie

1284059
 
 
Barked: Sat Feb 9, '13 7:05pm PST 
Thanks Smokey I'll check it out smile
[notify]
Sabi

When the night- closes in I will- be there
 
 
Barked: Sun Feb 10, '13 8:10am PST 
Tiller you've seen her so you would know. I was just reading a described behavior and it didn't sound like SA.
Sabi just stops when I leave, won't play, won't even get up. I joke that she has a power switch. I guess some would call that a mild form of SA. I was thinking that sounded more like what Josie was describing. Shadow periodically gets up and whines in her crate but that is just boredom, she's the Energizer Bunny.
Either way I hope the improvement continues.
[notify]
Isabelle the- Great

Nothing is- greater than an- Springer!
 
 
Barked: Mon Feb 11, '13 11:04am PST 
Wow, I know I said give her time but that rescue does not sound like a good rescue. It seems they rather mask problems then help the dog. I find that they basically blackmailed you into keeping Josie by saying they would kennel her if you brought her back. I hope everything works out.
[notify]
  (Page 7 of 9: Viewing entries 61 to 70)  
1  2  3  4  5  6  7  8  9