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The Yellow Dog Project

This is a place to gain some understanding of dog behavior and to assist people in training their dogs and dealing with common behavior problems, regardless of the method(s) used. This can cover the spectrum from non-aversive to traditional methods of dog training. There are many ways to train a dog. Please avoid aggressive responses, and counter ideas and opinions with which you don't agree with friendly and helpful advice. Please refrain from submitting posts that promote off-topic discussions. Keep in mind that you may be receiving advice from other dog owners and lovers... not professionals. If you have a major problem, always seek the advice of a trainer or behaviorist!

  
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Ellie

Qui me amat,- amet et canem- meum
 
 
Barked: Sun Jan 20, '13 11:43am PST 
I haven't posted in a while but thought this warranted sharing. Just got an email from my training center that talks about this newer idea called the yellow dog project. Dogs with yellow ribbon or something or something of the sort attached to their leash need to be given space for some reason or another. Thought is share to help spread the word!

http://www.theyellowdogproject.com/The_Yellow_Dog_Project/H ome.html
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Tiller- (Skansen's- Ira in the M

I DO Exist...To- Drive You Batty
 
 
Barked: Sun Jan 20, '13 2:49pm PST 
Linky

Worth spreading to increase awareness. Sort of frustrating, for this sort of stuff will only sink to well read people. With horses, EVERYONE knows what a red ribbon on the tail means. It just seems to me that it's harder to spread through dog communities. People with SDs have problems from dog lovers even when their dog is wearing a VEST. *sigh*
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Risa- W-FDM/MF RE- RL1 CA CGC

Awesome Dog
 
 
Barked: Sun Jan 20, '13 2:54pm PST 
I agree. I like the idea but, honestly, the people who are going to know about this are the sort that are already going to give your dog space. The average Joe with his happy-go-lucky Fido isn't going to be informed about this nor will they likely care. Besides, with Flexis and irresponsible people with off-lead dogs, they're not going to be able to see a yellow ribbon at that sort of distance to even consider it.

Unfortunately, I think I'm probably better off just keeping my dog away from other dogs on my own and not assume someone will do so because of a yellow ribbon on her leash.
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Rexy

I dig in mud- puddles!
 
 
Barked: Sun Jan 20, '13 5:51pm PST 
To be honest, I'm not a huge fan.

First off, if this does become relatively well known and recognized, then I can see people assuming that any dog *not* sporting a yellow ribbon is fine to approach. People can be amazingly oblivious and thoughtless.

Also, I would worry that the yellow ribbon could attract attention to my dog, not something that either of us would appreciate in the least.

My preference would be to focus on education and awareness about giving *every* dog out there space as a default.

I will keep using my voice, body language and common sense to keep my girl safe.
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Ellie

Qui me amat,- amet et canem- meum
 
 
Barked: Mon Jan 21, '13 10:19am PST 
It's true that words will always be your most valuable and effective tool, but if there could be a known sign that a particular dog needs space, I think it could be a great tool. Granted, most people will not be aware of what it means, but as a concept I like the idea. Even with widespread ideas, as Tiller mentions with SDs, there will be the people who ignore it, unfortunately.
But in my mind, anything that will help lesson the amount of panicked "back the f*#% off my dog is going to react!" moments isn't a bad idea.
Interesting point with the ribbon possibly drawing attention though thinking
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Rexy

I dig in mud- puddles!
 
 
Barked: Mon Jan 21, '13 12:57pm PST 
Ellie, that's why I will never take Rexy out in public while wearing a bandana. Even a backpack can be hit or miss some days...
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Nicky

bitches love- pantaloons
 
 
Barked: Mon Jan 21, '13 5:54pm PST 
I like the idea, and it would be really awesome if it does become successful, but the unfortunate truth is that people don't even listen when you're practically yelling and flailing at them to not come any closer shrug
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Tiller- (Skansen's- Ira in the M

I DO Exist...To- Drive You Batty
 
 
Barked: Mon Jan 21, '13 6:05pm PST 
I don't know what it would take. You can file it under "can't hurt" for sure, but I think that's about the extent of it. Not sure why....as I said, red ribbon on the tail of the horse (which means he will kick) is always respected, and you don't need to even be that experienced. It's odd to see that on the tail, so even through just pure conjecture, that usually works well enough.

ETA: Ellie, I hope you don't think we are all sucking lemons laugh out loud I think it's nice to try to create that sort of awareness, I just don't think it's anything you could universally trust.

Edited by author Mon Jan 21, '13 6:08pm PST

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Augusta,- CGC, RN

Such a Good Dog!
 
 
Barked: Mon Jan 21, '13 6:56pm PST 
It could be that people usually tend to get some kind of instruction when they take up riding, and at some point in one's riding career one is generally warned about the dangers of riding up on another horse's butt even if it doesn't have a red ribbon. It's just not a good idea or good etiquette.

Somehow with dogs and people that same etiquette lesson is not nearly as common knowledge.

I don't even have a reactive dog, but I sure don't want people letting their dogs straining at their leash excitedly to get at my dog foisting themselves on her--she's leery of it too. And often those are the owners that are all chipper yelling out, "Can they meet?"

I just tell them, no, my dog is nervous, put Gus to my outside and hurry along avoiding their path . . .
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Risa- W-FDM/MF RE- RL1 CA CGC

Awesome Dog
 
 
Barked: Tue Jan 22, '13 3:48am PST 
Maybe it's just the general public's view of dogs. Dogs are easily accessible (unlike horses) and many people seem to think their dog is friendly even if it's rude, reactive, or doesn't play well with others. As is, many people seem to think they have a right to pet your dog just because it's out in public. Perhaps they think the entire world is a dog park and that dogs should meet their "friends" wherever they go. I don't know. But I see a lot of people on walks who just let their dogs go right up to whatever dog is passing them without a single word to the other owner. Not even a "Can he meet your dog?" I avoid those people like the plague.

Reactive dog or not, my dogs do not meet strange dogs on walks. I choose our friends carefully and give a wide berth to dogs on Flexis and dogs who, even on leash, are not controlled by their owners.

Edited by author Tue Jan 22, '13 3:48am PST

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