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How to Deal with a Dog Going Deaf

This is a place to gain some understanding of dog behavior and to assist people in training their dogs and dealing with common behavior problems, regardless of the method(s) used. This can cover the spectrum from non-aversive to traditional methods of dog training. There are many ways to train a dog. Please avoid aggressive responses, and counter ideas and opinions with which you don't agree with friendly and helpful advice. Please refrain from submitting posts that promote off-topic discussions. Keep in mind that you may be receiving advice from other dog owners and lovers... not professionals. If you have a major problem, always seek the advice of a trainer or behaviorist!

  
Madison

Don't disturb me- I'm on fly- patrol!
 
 
Barked: Sat Dec 1, '12 4:45pm PST 
Howdy guys, Ginger is currently 14 a real old lady. She has been slowly loosing her hearing. I am wondering how we can deal with this training wise and most importantly saftey for her and people around her. Disturbing a dog that does not know your there is a good way to get bit. So how can we work around that? Do they make vibration collars? The other issue is what about her safetey? The other day I was unloading stuff from my truck and left the door open and the dogs were following me in and out of the house. No biggie I do it all the time. Well when it comes time to be done I don't know where Ging was so I called loudly. I thought she wandered inside but I could not find her. Turns out she was on the other side of the truck next to a bush smelling it. So I'm wondering what could I do. So visual cues for training, vibration collar? I have not a clue on dealing with a deaf dog thankfully she still has some hearing if you are near enough she responds normally. I'm more concerned if the trend of deafness continues.
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Kali earned- her wings- 10/21/14

She's game for- anything that's- fun.
 
 
Barked: Sun Dec 2, '12 9:58am PST 
I don't have a deaf dog, but I've read some posts of people who do. They say use visual cues, like signing. That may work well for you since she's obviously trained in the basics so you can just add the visual cues to her commands. Walking so they can feel vibration also helps. Maybe someone else can pop in and give you some advice. Good Luck!
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Kali earned- her wings- 10/21/14

She's game for- anything that's- fun.
 
 
Barked: Sun Dec 2, '12 10:02am PST 
I just noticed that there are some other threads on here about deaf dogs. You might want to scroll down and see them. smile
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Sanka- I'll Miss- You

The ground is my- newspaper.
 
 
Barked: Sun Dec 2, '12 3:54pm PST 
Sanka isn't deaf, but he is certainly VERY hard of hearing. I guess it isn't that big of a jump for me because he's always been an independent hound, and I just got used to him not listening.laugh out loud

Clapping seems to be about the only think he'll really respond to now. If he's say on the other side of the room, I can clap (really loud!) and he'll hear it. He isn't able to pinpoint the location of the sound, but he hears it enough to have a look. And that's when I usually point or pat my leg to get him to come along.

Outside, he usually doesn't hear much...or at least it seems that way. He's never been good off leash, so I've just gotten used to always keeping an eye on him when out and about.

There are 2 "problems" that I've run into. One is at the dog park. If I want to leave, he'll be on the other side of the park, and I just have to wait until he makes his way around. I've always been a patient person, but that really helps me practice patience.laugh out loud

The other is waking him from sleep. He's a sound sleeper too. No sound will wake him up. Smells don't wake him up. I put a fresh slice of bacon in front of his nose, and he didn't wake up! The only way I can wake him up is by touch, and it does startle him sometimes unfortunately. I try my best to not have to wake him up, but older dogs just tend to sleep more, and he can be completely out seconds after laying down too.
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Czarka, CGC- UJJ

Why walk when- you can run?
 
 
Barked: Mon Dec 3, '12 7:59am PST 
beautiful lady... of course I think that for all shepherd pics wink

I assume issue is getting your pup's attention? Training hand signals... for dogs, the hand signal is easier to learn than words. However, it's hard to see your elegant signals if the dog does not realize it's time to look. The easiest/best tool for attention is a vibration collar. It can be used to mean 'look at me' or 'come'. I am not aware of a better way to begin conversation with a deaf dog (you can try a flashlight or a whistle -- _might_ work). Once they are looking at you... hand signals work well. Charka is not deaf... but, from training and experience will look back for my hand gesture on walks when we hit decision points. I DO give her hand commands for right/left/go on (straight) as well as the obedience set... sits at the curbs are automatic.
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MACH4 PACH2- Aslan

RAE TQX MXF MXB2- MJS2 MXBP MXJP,- etc.
 
 
Barked: Mon Dec 3, '12 11:14pm PST 
Here is an article I wrote on training deaf dogs. It may have some good links for you as well. Good luck!!

http://agilitymach.hubpages.com/hub/How-to-Train-a-Deaf-Do g-Basic-Obedience-Tips-for-Dogs-Who-Cant-Hear
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Czarka, CGC- UJJ

Why walk when- you can run?
 
 
Barked: Tue Dec 4, '12 11:36am PST 
Good article, Aslan!
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MACH4 PACH2- Aslan

RAE TQX MXF MXB2- MJS2 MXBP MXJP,- etc.
 
 
Barked: Tue Dec 4, '12 10:21pm PST 
Thank you. smile
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