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Pulling on a Lead

This is a place to gain some understanding of dog behavior and to assist people in training their dogs and dealing with common behavior problems, regardless of the method(s) used. This can cover the spectrum from non-aversive to traditional methods of dog training. There are many ways to train a dog. Please avoid aggressive responses, and counter ideas and opinions with which you don't agree with friendly and helpful advice. Please refrain from submitting posts that promote off-topic discussions. Keep in mind that you may be receiving advice from other dog owners and lovers... not professionals. If you have a major problem, always seek the advice of a trainer or behaviorist!

  
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Member Since
10/24/2012
 
 
Barked: Thu Oct 25, '12 10:20am PST 
Hi, I am just hoping for some advice on here, I have an 18 mth old Akita who is a lovely dog but a nightmare for pulling on the lead. We got him from a re-homing center and is great in every other way but for walking on a lead. If anyone can suggest any tips or harnesses or collars that we could try please.

Thanks Elaine
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Jocie Anna- Dorkus

Miss Spitfire
 
 
Barked: Fri Oct 26, '12 9:21pm PST 
I would strongly reccomend using a choke collar. It only tightens on the dog when the dog pulls on the lead and automatically loosens when thee is slack on the lead. Just make sure to put it on right otherwise it will not be able to loosen. It is human and even used on police dogs. In this method of training there is no begging the dog to stay...there is only what my trainer calls show (hes gonna become more uncomfortable the more he disregards you leadership) and tell (giving a command to heal means you want them at your side). By the way if you would like some proof that this method works my trainer's name is Neal D. Lease. He has had at least one dog in the Guinness book of world records in regards to obedience training. smile
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Jocie Anna- Dorkus

Miss Spitfire
 
 
Barked: Fri Oct 26, '12 9:22pm PST 
I would strongly reccomend using a choke collar. It only tightens on the dog when the dog pulls on the lead and automatically loosens when thee is slack on the lead. Just make sure to put it on right otherwise it will not be able to loosen. It is human and even used on police dogs. In this method of training there is no begging the dog to stay...there is only what my trainer calls show (hes gonna become more uncomfortable the more he disregards you leadership) and tell (giving a command to heal means you want them at your side). By the way if you would like some proof that this method works my trainer's name is Neal D. Lease. He has had at least one dog in the Guinness book of world records in regards to obedience training. smile
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Lobo

"Stubborn" dogs- don't need- corrections
 
 
Barked: Fri Oct 26, '12 9:29pm PST 
I have to strongly disagree with Jocie.

Just as our necks are extremely sensitive, a dog's neck is also extremely sensitive. GENTLY feel your dog's neck as you feel yours. You will feel the same organs in relatively the same places. Imagine now the feeling of something wrapped around your neck. Physically, it is extremely uncomfortable - sometimes painful. Emotionally, it is certainly panic-inducing.

Besides that, choke collars do not actually work. When a dog feels pressure, their instinct is to push AGAINST that pressure, not to pull away from it. It only seems to help because they can't pull as much as they could on a flat collar.

Lobo and I use a front-clip harness. MANY people highly suggest the Freedom Harness. http://ahimsadogtraining.com/store/proddetail.php?prod=MCH-0082

A side from that, of course, you'll want to train your dog so that she no long pulls ever. (although I highly recommend always using a harness; again, because their necks are sensitive)

The method of choice I chose for Lobo was the video posted by Kikopup on YouTube. There is a dogster here by the name of Asher who also has an amazing video for loose leash walking.
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Member Since
10/24/2012
 
 
Barked: Sat Oct 27, '12 1:08am PST 
Hi Thank you both for the replies, I have a harness already so will try with that again.
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Foxxy

Pocket Wolf
 
 
Barked: Sat Oct 27, '12 5:53am PST 
gentle leader or snoot loop. This is the only way we got foxxy to stop pulling. It takes a little bit of training for hem to ignore a face lead, but it's a lot safer and less frustrating for you. Lest frustrating walks lead to a positive feedback of calm vibes.
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Jocie Anna- Dorkus

Miss Spitfire
 
 
Barked: Sat Oct 27, '12 11:36am PST 
The choke collar does not actually choke the dog and is used for training that is imparative to both the dog and handler. Nor do I just yank and pull with it. Like the example of a child about to run into traffic you only tighten your grip on their arm I. The decontrol that they make that forward motion. Also your neck has a lot of muscle so the ammount of pressure unforced by the collar does nothing but get them to realize that their disobedience is not worth the struggle for independence. My own puppy has gotten to the point that she sees training as a game. She is happy and not cowed when training. Her tail wags enthusiastically and though her her ears are back it is the same body language you would see on a wolf when greeting its alpha. Its not like this method does not include lots of hugs and petting when she obeys. Every single time she obeys I give her lots of love and repeat that she is a good girl. Its all in the body language that she is happy. In fact my trainer constantly reminds people that affection is extremely important. Honestly if people would actually study this method instead of assuming the worst they would see that its not a painful experience for the dog. And I would trust a dog that went through this method to heel off leash more than any other method.blue dog
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Jocie Anna- Dorkus

Miss Spitfire
 
 
Barked: Sat Oct 27, '12 11:58am PST 
Another point is that people wear a choker necklaces all the time... its also like when you put a saddle on an unbroken horse for the first time. They are going to be stressed out by the saddle and also the harness. But with lots of love and attention they see it as another form of communication that is not harmful. Is it uncomfortable for a horse to have stuff in its mouth? Yes of course, but they soon get used to it and are not fearful of their handler. Discomfort is not bad. It is not actual pain. Watch a video of a horse being introduced to a halter and saddle. they dislike being led and the pressure of both. Bit is that harmful to them?snoopy

Edited by author Sat Oct 27, '12 12:01pm PST

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Bosley

Will Work For- Food
 
 
Barked: Sat Oct 27, '12 12:04pm PST 
If my dog's ears were pinned back during training, I would take that as a sign of stress and would take a hard look at what I was doing to cause that stress. Jocie, you don't seriously use a choke chain on a papillion, do you?

Choke chains are really an outdated pet dog dog training method. It is preferred to reward your dog for the behavior you want rather than punishing for what you don't want. This creates a much better understanding for the dog rather than being yanked around for no apparent reason. If your dog pulls, I would start with a non-pull harness (not a regular) harness, so that your dog is not rehearsing the behavior you don't want. Then you can add in positive reinforcement training to get the behavior you want. If you look up videos on YouTube of clicker training loose leash walking, you will find lots of good examples on how to start and how to build up duration and distraction.

Edited by author Sat Oct 27, '12 12:11pm PST

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Ninja PD SR1- RATS MBDCh- FM

Take That!
 
 
Barked: Sat Oct 27, '12 12:05pm PST 
A choke collar is harmful to a dog's throat long term, and its not a clear communication to help the dog learn what it is you WANT him to do, which is to walk calmly witha loose leash. At best a choke collar may supress the pulling, but the moment you take off the choke collar, the dog starts pulling again. Again, no communication of what you want from the dog, just an adversive that does more harm then good.

Edited by author Sat Oct 27, '12 12:07pm PST

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