GO!

cat chasing cocker puppy

This is a place to gain some understanding of dog behavior and to assist people in training their dogs and dealing with common behavior problems, regardless of the method(s) used. This can cover the spectrum from non-aversive to traditional methods of dog training. There are many ways to train a dog. Please avoid aggressive responses, and counter ideas and opinions with which you don't agree with friendly and helpful advice. Please refrain from submitting posts that promote off-topic discussions. Keep in mind that you may be receiving advice from other dog owners and lovers... not professionals. If you have a major problem, always seek the advice of a trainer or behaviorist!

  
(Page 1 of 2: Viewing entries 1 to 10)  
Page Links: 1  2  
Gengis-Khan

Turd-napper!
 
 
Barked: Sat Mar 12, '11 9:32am PST 
Can someone give me advice as to how to stop a puppy from chasing cats? i know that his breed is more apt to chasing small animals, but he is only 4 months old. we have cats and everyone in our family has cats. The cats will beat the crap out of him if he comes to close but i dont want him to get afraid of them. any tips?
[notify]
Torie

If you can roll- in the dirt, do- it!
 
 
Barked: Sat Mar 12, '11 1:30pm PST 
It isn't too early to start making your environment "cat friendly". Set up a "safe room", if possible, where the dog does not have access (also helps with the snacking on toostie rolls). Set up a high cat tree or two. Cats love vertical space anyway.

It is useful to teach your dog an alternative behavior. For instance, teach them to get a toy on cue. (Most spaniels will be good at fetch but you might have to teach it on cue.) I pick a time when Torie is in a mood to play and then reinforce her for bringing me a toy and put a cue to it. (If you want more of an explanation I can do this.)
"Leave it" is good too. But you want to teach what you "want the dog to do" as this will be far more helpful than a no you can't do that.


BTW, I don't think Spaniels are really a particularly high prey drive dog. Nothing like a terrier, say. So I don't think the odds breed wise are against you.

Also some cats will actually seek out a little recreation chase. If you find your cat actually outsmarting the dog (Hermione loves to tease Torie by getting up somewhere high and looking down on her. laugh out loud, you might actually have friends that can play together. It's the best case scenario, esp. if they will also greet each other.


--des
[notify]
Isabelle the- Great

Nothing is- greater than an- Springer!
 
 
Barked: Sat Mar 12, '11 5:27pm PST 
BTW, I don't think Spaniels are really a particularly high prey drive dog.

Tell that to Isabelle please... she has killed numerous birds and one rabbit. She has also gone after deer and other small animals. laugh out loud Though I may have asked for that when I got a field bred English Springer Spaniel.

I do want to caution that Cockers are particularly sensitive. I wouldn't let the cats beat the crap out of your puppy because one day that puppy will be bigger than the cats and prey drive or not, the cats will be on the loosing end of the stick. When your cats begin to beat the crap out of your puppy, immediately stop all interaction.

I am betting you heard Spaniels are great with cats, which they are... I have had Spaniels all of my life, but it took work and boundaries for the dogs and cats to get along. I never allow the dogs to harass the cats, especially if it is making them angry. Plus a puppy tends to annoy an adult cat.

Can you give more specifics on the cat-dog interactions? Do the cats start it? Torie was on to something there, two of my cats like to swish their tails in the dogs' faces and then run. Does the puppy seek them out to chase? How long does it take for the puppy to annoy the cats?
[notify]

Torie

If you can roll- in the dirt, do- it!
 
 
Barked: Sat Mar 12, '11 8:24pm PST 
Well I stand by higher authority here re: Spaniels (but I have read that they can be very good with cats). Though I do think the birds and so on would be more appealing as prey. Torie doesn't go after birds however she does like the lizards around here. I think she is more interested in herding the cats than eating them. smile

I agree re: kittens and adult dogs sometimes. Actually kittens and everybody! Kittens can have way more energy than should be allowed by law. smile The same goes for puppies and adult cats. Make sure your puppy gets enough exercise so he doesn't go after the cats to exercise himself.

If you provide vertical space for the cat, it will help everyone involved.

Teaching a good leave it, and also alternative behaviors (such as a good down and to get another toy)-- this all should help.



--des
[notify]
Gengis-Khan

Turd-napper!
 
 
Barked: Sat Mar 12, '11 11:14pm PST 
The cats have there own "room" which is blocked off from the puppy by a gate. They have there own litterbox, water dish, ect in there safe room. In the "common" area they have cat trees. The girls (my 2 cats) ignor Khan untill he is right in there face. They are acully really good with him, they dont slink around or act nuts. But he wants to play and chase them and obviously they dont want to play. I am worried the cats are going to beat the crap out of him (they will, too. There not shy) then Khan will learn to fear them, and thats not what i want.

Ive had the girls for almost 6 years. They have delt with dogs/puppys before. My first dog Bowser only had to be smacked once by the cat to "get it" and wasnt afraid. Id rather they dont "teach" Khan the same way because he is still young and in his fear imprinting stage.

Cockers wernt bred to "kill" small game, but I do beleve any gundog has a good chase drive. Khan just is playing, but i want to curb this behaviour for many reasons. He WILL be bigger then them someday, and if one of the cats fight him, they will lose. Also i dont want him taking off after strays, ect.

"leave it" sounds like a good idea.
[notify]
Dingo

Leader of the- Dog Gestapo
 
 
Barked: Sun Mar 13, '11 1:10am PST 
Dingo is a rehabbed cat chaser. My best advice: catch the behavior in the starting stages and redirect. Don't let it get far enough for him to get in their faces.

Most dogs, especially working breeds, have a 'tell' when they buckle down and go after what they consider prey... if that is indeed what he is doing. If he is treating them like prey, you should watch the situation develop. You will eventually notice something that signals the start of it all - Dingo's is a general tenseness and his ears go way forward, so sometimes they stand up straight. He might also crouch as he moves forward. Once you notice it, break his focus with a cue word (leave it works well) and redirect to a toy or game. Eventually he will get that cats are not things to pounce on. Depending on how hard his head is, it might take a bit, but consistency is important, even for a well learned behavior. If I forget just once to do this with Dingo, I'll have him chasing one of our cats through the house in no time!

If he just wants to play, there may be no tell at all though.

Good luck way to go
[notify]
Torie

If you can roll- in the dirt, do- it!
 
 
Barked: Sun Mar 13, '11 1:41am PST 
IMO, just a straight leave it isn't enough. I think it is usually better to teach a new behavior.

Also I think you can work on the puppy being friends with the cats thru short sessions. I think the cats are going to be more the wild card here, as you don't exactly know which ones will work out here and which will not. Cats aren't what you call predictable.

I think clicker training works great here. You can condition the clicker on the cats (though you can't expect huge alerting response to the clicker like dogs have). You can then have sessions with dog and cats. You basically use some delicious meat as and throw it for anything you like in either cat or dog. Initially it might be just being in the same room or it could be for calm or greeting or whatever. This really works great and I used it for getting Torie and all cats I have had with Torie (3). And she has liked all three and vice versa (though to lesser or greater degrees). It is not hard to use clicker with cats here at all, imo. Heck they use it with lions and tigers.

BTW, I do differentiate between play and not so play chases.I am sure its confusing,and really makes it harder. However, they have a lot of fun with each other, esp. Hermione. I would not do this with some breeds or a dog that had a relentless prey drive. I suppose with some breeds it could be like playing with fire. And I wouldn't do this with a cat that hated it. But Torie is very reliable and in my case the cats are quite capable of taking care of themselves, thank you very much. I had an elderly cat who stopped tolerating it. Torie learned quickly that he was pretty cranky! You really need to do this on a case by case thing. But I don't think there is much cuter than a cat and dog playing together.

--des
[notify]
Fritz

Fritz, cats are- fun when they- run
 
 
Barked: Sun Mar 13, '11 9:04am PST 
Be careful with this behavior,some dogs like to chase cats for fun, sometimes the cats even get into the game.

However, some of us chase cats to kill them, like me. If I can get a hold of a cat, I will attempt to break its spin by shacking it HARD.

I would stop the puppy every time, don't let him get in a cats face and if it looks too serious, get professional help.
[notify]
Gengis-Khan

Turd-napper!
 
 
Barked: Sun Mar 13, '11 3:00pm PST 
I beg to differ on the cats not being perdictable. I can tell what they will do at any given time threw body signals. Khan is more unpredictable becaue he has no attention span. one minute hes sitting chewing on his toy the next hes after the cat. I dont think he is thinking about chasing the cats he just does.

Neither pet is the bad guy. Khan just wants to play and the cats just want to be left alone. I dont think he wants to kill them, but i want to stop his "playing" so it dosnt turn into a problem once hes older.

The cats leave him alone as long as hes not chasing them, staring at them like hes gunna chase them, or otherwise displaying body signals that they do not apporve of.
[notify]
Torie

If you can roll- in the dirt, do- it!
 
 
Barked: Sun Mar 13, '11 3:22pm PST 
Fritz, I would never suggest encouraging play if there were any signs of kill type behavior. I have a lot more experience with gun dogs and herding breeds. (Actually I don't have any at all with Spaniels, so my understanding is more on Labs and Goldens and so on.)

Genghis, I live with a kitten, and I htink they are like puppies in that way. I have no idea what Hermione is thinking from one minute to the next.( I may not be smart enough.) OTOH, I do understand what's going on with Padfoot (the older cat).

If the cats don't want to play, they may just not want to interact with an obnoxious kitten (so you could try my suggestions on play later), but you could still teach tolerance via clicker. Cats respond really well to clicker training.

I don't have any disagreement with teaching a strong leave it and a get the "whatever you want to call a plush toy". Teaching getting the toy is a great substitute for a play type chase.

I am guessing this is a play response (from a puppy)and not a kill. If you have a kill type response, which I doubt, then you are going to need a much more serious approach. I do not think in that case, that the dog should have any interaction with cats at all.

--des


--des
[notify]
  (Page 1 of 2: Viewing entries 1 to 10)  
Page Links: 1  2