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Grabbing My Leg and Humping

This is a place to gain some understanding of dog behavior and to assist people in training their dogs and dealing with common behavior problems, regardless of the method(s) used. This can cover the spectrum from non-aversive to traditional methods of dog training. There are many ways to train a dog. Please avoid aggressive responses, and counter ideas and opinions with which you don't agree with friendly and helpful advice. Please refrain from submitting posts that promote off-topic discussions. Keep in mind that you may be receiving advice from other dog owners and lovers... not professionals. If you have a major problem, always seek the advice of a trainer or behaviorist!

  
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Zeus

829354
 
 
Barked: Fri Oct 31, '08 5:33pm PST 
I am having 3 issues with my 6 month olde english bullogge.
.

1) He stands on his hind legs and wraps his front paws around my leg and tries to hump my leg I know this is a dominance thing. What gets me is that he doesn't do this with my wife. When he does this I tell him off or no and after a few minutes he is right back at it. Is he trying this with me because he sees me as weaker than my wife??

2) It's hard to eat my meals. When I am eating he comes to the table and puts his front paws on the edge of the table. How can I break him out of this? When I crate him when I am eating, he barks like crazy. I also try to feed him when I eat, but he finishes his food very quickly and I am still eating.

3) He is constantly trying to get on my leather sofa. He has his own big doggy bed but rarely uses it.

Edited by author Sat Nov 1, '08 6:27am PST

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Buddy , ^_^

dogis a- nicerpersonthan- an averageperson
 
 
Barked: Fri Oct 31, '08 5:39pm PST 
Viniger!!! That is VERY affective. Keep it by you at the table and after getting sprayed a couple times he'll run a the site of vinigar!
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Indy

There is no such- thing as the- alpha.
 
 
Barked: Sat Nov 1, '08 5:52am PST 
Dominance and rank are popular myths. They're old theories that weren't ever really thoroughly examined, and have now been replaced by newer, more accurate, and more researched models. So fear not, your 6 month old is NOT trying to dominate you.

Humping is a way of making social contact-- but it also signifies that presence of stress and/or tension. It is a form of attraction, but there is a block somewhere preventing the dog from fulfilling the attraction normally. The stress from that is offloaded into humping.

Have you tried redirecting him? Instead of correcting him, or saying no-- try playing with him instead. When he comes up to you with that "look" like he's about to hump, have a toy ready and run away from him. The best game to play is tug, and let him rip the toy out of your hands. The purpose of this is to satisfy the urges in him, so that he learns humping is NOT successful in relieving stress, and that playing with you via a toy is.
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Cracker

Dog About- Rosedale

moderator
 
 
Barked: Sat Nov 1, '08 6:24am PST 
Great post Indy, I agree wholeheartedly!

OP, your dog is not trying to dominate you. One, he is an excitable puppy and two he hasn't learned his "human" manners yet. Redirection is a great thing..and bullies LOVE to tug!

As for the table manners. I think crating him is a good idea, what you may want to do is put his meal into a puzzle toy, like a tug a jug or stuffed into a kong or two so he has to keep busy for a while to be fed. Peanut butter frozen into a kong is a fave of my dog.

Once your boy has some more obedience training under his belt (get thee to a puppy class, my son!) you can try not crating him but having him lie on a mat with his food toys.

Good luck, he's a CUTE boy!
Zeus

829354
 
 
Barked: Sat Nov 1, '08 6:26am PST 
Indy very nice post please explain this further:

Humping is a way of making social contact-- but it also signifies that presence of stress and/or tension. It is a form of attraction, but there is a block somewhere preventing the dog from fulfilling the attraction normally. The stress from that is offloaded into humping.

Is tug of war good? I have read that it can make your dog aggressive? Please advise.
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Taz - cgc tdi

869092
 
 
Barked: Sat Nov 1, '08 6:28am PST 
Once again Indi, I am here to disagree with you. No one has been able to disprove dominance. I know their are a lot of people that have tried, and to their credit that they have discovered and unraveled many different behaviors, but the dominance theory still applies. Humping can be due to stress, but it most certainly can be a way of showing control or dominance. For example, if a dog were to try to do this to Taz, he would put them back in their place right away. Why, because he's a very confident assertive dog, or a dominate dog.
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Cracker

Dog About- Rosedale

moderator
 
 
Barked: Sat Nov 1, '08 6:36am PST 
Hi again.
Problem number three....training...training...training. If he gets up, gently lure him off and reward him for staying on the floor. Work on rewarding him for "going to his bed".

Indy can probably better explain the concept of stress etc in humping but MY take on it is ...excitement (social, play excitement, or confusion as to WHAT he SHOULD do) revs him up and he's not sure what to do with the energy in his body. The idea behind the tug game is for him to be able to reduce the level of energy and direct it towards you in an appropriate manner. Appropriate to you that is. Humping is a normal social behaviour often done in play.

Properly played, Tug does NOT create aggression in your dog. In fact it can become a great training reward and outlet for you and your dog to bond.

The thought that it creates challenges is based on the idea that our dogs are always trying to dominate us and that letting them win will increase their control over us. This is outdated theory. Indy can probably give you some great links to articles that you may want to read. It really will open your eyes to dog/human relationships if you take off the dominance glasses and look at it in new ways.
Taz - cgc tdi

869092
 
 
Barked: Sat Nov 1, '08 6:43am PST 
I agree with humping being done in play, but let me ask you something, why is it only done on some dogs and not other?. Why does a dog do this to one human in the family but not the others? Why do you see dogs do this more often with kids then adults? Why will a dog do this to one dog he's playing with, but even if never corrected, won't attempt it on another?

Edited by author Sat Nov 1, '08 6:54am PST

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Cracker

Dog About- Rosedale

moderator
 
 
Barked: Sat Nov 1, '08 6:59am PST 
Hi Taz.
I'm not saying dominance does not exist at all of course it does. I guess my real concern is that people often assume all misbehaviour is dominance without looking to see if it could be something else, bad manners, over excitement or lack of training.

Maybe Dad's reaction to the humping is more exciting than Mom's would be. Maybe Mom behaves differently and pup doesn't get as excited in general with her. It's like a jumping puppy...if they get no reaction or a walk away, they are more likely to go jump on the person who squeals, pushes them off with their hands etc.

I also think that dogs will hump different dogs for many different reasons. Some for play, some for ranking and some they don't bother with because of the other dog's demeanor.

Cracker doesn't like being humped and will definitely tell off most who try...every once in a while she allows it (close friends only..bol) but in general most dogs she meets don't try it..just the occasional one. Then again, not all dogs want to play with her either and vice versa. Each dog is an individual and relationships between them can vary.

My opinion of dominance theory (the ORIGINAL dominance theory) that ALL dogs are CONSTANTLY looking to one up each other is that it is not true. Dogs evolved to work co operatively with each other and with us. Some ranking can come into play as co operation does need some sort of social organization but to look at every doggy thing as if it were a plan to usurp the one above is often not seeing the forest for the trees.

We still need to be leaders to our dogs but communication goes both ways so we need to be open that other possibilities for certain behaviours are there.
Taz - cgc tdi

869092
 
 
Barked: Sat Nov 1, '08 7:15am PST 
Nice post Cracker. I think you bring up a good point too. The original dominance theory is flawed, but you need to keep in mind, that like most theories, they grow and adapt as more information comes to light. For example I agree most dogs are not looking to move up in rank. In fact, I would say most dogs are very happy to be at the bottom. But that said, I also know that dogs are hardwired to take control if none is provided.

Edited by author Sat Nov 1, '08 7:16am PST

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