Indy (Indiana)


Norwegian Elkhound/German Shepherd
Picture of Indy (Indiana), a female Norwegian Elkhound/German Shepherd

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Home:San Francisco, CA  
Sex: Female   Weight: 26-50 lbs

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   Leave a bone for Indy (Indiana)

Nicknames:
Punkin-Dog, Squeaker, Dumplin', Mess-Dog, Riding-Dog, Grey Bear, Bear-Dog, Miss Indiana

Quick Bio:
-mutt-dog rescue

Likes:
Riding in the car, Getting brushed; Lying upside-down (legs in mid-air); Having her picture taken; Being ON TOP OF or UNDER anything; Opening Christmas presents; Making her toys "talk" (squeak), "guarding" the staircase

Pet-Peeves:
Getting out of the car; baths; being shoo-ed off the bed; Eating HER food; Coming in from the yard or driveway or fill-in-the-blank

Favorite Toy:
One favorite? No way... Hedgehog (the one that looks like her); Purple Elephant; Mr. Lion; Christmas Bone; Mr. Cow; Holey Teddy, Purple Junior; Mr. Gorilla

Favorite Food:
Pizza; Bacon Strips; Treats from her Special Treat Jar given to her by her raddy Paul (has blue pawprints on it); her vitamins; cookies

Favorite Walk:
Precita Park; Pinehaven Road in Montclair/Oakland Hills; National AIDS Memorial Grove; Redwoods in East Bay

Arrival Story:
My collection of dog photos is one of the greatest treasures I will ever own. The principal subject (OK the only subject) in most of them, is my beloved canine Indiana, known as “Indy.” An unusual mix of Norwegian Elkhound and German Shepherd, Indy was rescued in August of 1988 from an apartment complex in Dallas when she about twelve weeks old. My friend Donna, the building's part-time manager, discovered a young puppy in an apartment after the tenant moved out. If being abandoned wasn’t traumatic enough, there’s more. Indy wasn’t left to roam the apartment while her previous owners (and I use that term loosely…) made a quick get-away. Indy was found whimpering in a locked closet without food, water or light. It was Monday morning and the people had moved out the Friday before, so she had probably been imprisoned for almost three days. Clearly then, Indy had been left to fend for herself, and were it not for luck and Indy's fortitude, she would have perished within a couple of days. I weep openly thinking of that happening to her, and cannot imagine how anyone could possibly be so vicious and cruel. There's a silver lining, though. Were it not for their savagery, Indy would not have arrived so dramatically in my life that day and the experiences of last sixteen years would not exist as I know them now. But they do – and I am here to celebrate the many incredible years I had with this unique, intelligent, funny, and inspirational dog. Indy was my constant companion, my traveling buddy, my supportive roommate, my teacher, and the most significant family I have outside of my family of origin. We were apart for a total of about six weeks over those 16 years, so we definitely qualify as “joined at the hip.” I cannot say enough about the power of sharing one’s life with another creature, animal or human. I am forever changed by Indy who, abandoned and left to die very early, instead lived a life of incredible time and dimension with me. Indy was a font of affection, a caring soul who never tired of giving, and a master at demonstrating the power of unconditional love. She inspired me to reach out and give the world the best I have to offer. She showed me how to give freely of myself, how to listen more and speak less, and how to open my heart to receive the gifts of others. But the greatest lesson Indy taught was the idea of living in the moment. Unlike human beings, it is my firm belief that animals do not spend a lot of time future-tripping – wondering what’s going to happen next, wishing and hoping for specific things to occur. One need only spend an hour with any animal to see that their apparent joy in life isn’t based on what they have, but is instead predicated on making the most of what’s right in front of them. Simple to understand, but hard to practice. When I have difficulty practicing this ideal in my own life, I need only recall Indy riding in the car. She would go wild, dancing and running back and forth to the car, never knowing where we were going. The thing is, she didn’t care. To her, the journey WAS the destination. Anyone who knew Indy, knew she was enthusiastic about everything. She lived a long, full life filled with people who loved her. Indy was a real trouper, enduring the complications of Addison’s disease, and all of its treatment implications, for many years. Rarely did she seem to be the least bit affected. She lived forcefully until the very last minutes of her life. I was blessed to have her in my life for so long, and to hold her in my arms as she took her last breath. Thank you to everyone who called me, sent cards, or wrote letters when she passed on. I will always be grateful that so many people gave so freely of themselves. Because Indy had several brushes with death over the years, I had some time to contemplate the day that I would lose her. I knew it would be difficult, but I was not prepared for the full impact of her death. Nor did I know that I would feel so empty and lost. As part of the necessary grief work and to begin the long process of healing my soul, I designed and created a short movie, a slide show really of about 150 photos I had taken of her over the years. I wanted to reflect on this incredible creature who came into my life accidentally, and share those memories with others. [Anyone who reads this and would be interested in seeing the finished movie, is more than welcome to contact me (treyde at yahoo dot com) and ask about it. It is a wonderful show with music, a dedication, and a short bio that runs on Windows and Macintosh. It is on CD-ROM, and am more than happy to help others interested in having a show made using their pet's photos, a wonderful way to share your dog's photos with others.] The activities Indy loved the most in life were riding in the car with the windows down, even at 70 m.p.h., destination irrelevant; getting new squeaky toys, which she would squeak (“Make it talk Indy…”) when she felt she was lacking adequate attention, ever reminding us of her presence; lying under anything; eating anything but her own food; sleeping on any bed except hers; “guarding” the top of any staircase; finding and unwrapping her Christmas presents; and lying upside-down as much as possible. Creating this page in her memory and sharing it with the many F.O.I. (friends of Indy) out there who loved her has also been a healing experience the likes of which has never passed my way before. I am truly grateful for all the support the animal lover's community has given me in the last couple of month as I grieved for Indy. On Thursday, March 4, 2004, as I held her gently in my arms, she took her last breath and passed peacefully into her next life. She had reached the ripe old age of 15 years and 10 months, which is 110 in dog years. Bearing witness to her death was at once devastating, surreal, and serenely beautiful. I miss her desperately, but I'm certain I’ll see her again. So here’s to you punkin-dog. You’ve got the world on a string – just don’t forget your squeaker toy! See you in the next life! All My Love, Daddy Trey

Bio:
August 1988 - Rescued from abandoned apartment closet in Dallas, Texas; age approximately 12 weeks. September 1988 - Indy made her first (of many) escape from our yard; Indy has always been a wanderer, and her Houdini-like talents for finding the smallest niche in which to slide her body through to the other side of the (fence, door, yard, you name it...) age approximately 16 weeks; I was panicked when I came home from work and she was not in the yard because at that time I lived right next to a very busy street in Dallas, and of course, I immediately feared the worst. I quickly posted signs and made the rounds in the neighborhood. Over the years, I would discover bit-by-bit that Indy wasn't really escaping, or running away, as she was simply going to visit... somebody! Within a couple of hours there was a sighting, and half an hour after that, I had to go and bring her home so the neighbor five blocks away could get her cat out the tree that Indy had cornered the poor thing in! The thing is, and this is a theme and personality characteristic of Indy – she never threatened or hurt or even touched any cat... in fact as she got older and mellowed, she would simply stand there and watch.... as if she couldn't quite figure out what that furball of a creature was.... If their is such as thing as reincarnation, Indy had been through it. I am convinced that in a past life she was a cat. She possessed many feline qualities and at times watching her play with things, get on top of tables and the like, and how truly mesmerized she was by other cats, I believe she was once feline. She loved cat food, played with balls of yarn and other things, and lived to listen for and search out the mice in our yard. But that's not the most compelling evidence for her previous cat-life... Indy truly had nine lives. (more to come) …Nine Lives (very Feline was Indy) More to come... Escape Artist (Houdini Dog)

I've Been On Dogster Since:
April 12th 2004 More than 10 years!

Rosette, Star and Special Gift History

Dogster Id:
28667


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