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How Much Does Dog Grooming Cost? 2024 Price Guide

Written by: Brooke Billingsley

Last Updated on June 3, 2024 by Dogster Team

yorkie being groomed on table

How Much Does Dog Grooming Cost? 2024 Price Guide

If you’ve had a dog that required routine grooming, you already have a good idea of the costs associated with it. If you’re new to the dog grooming game, though, then you may be surprised to find out how much you might be spending on getting your dog groomed, especially if your dog is large or has a high-maintenance coat. Grooming prices vary based on your dog’s size and type of coat from $25 for a small dog with short hair to $150+ for a giant breed with a curly or matted coat.

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The Importance of Dog Grooming

The importance of having your dog groomed is primarily dependent on your dog’s breed and coat type. If you have a dog like a Poodle or a Bichon Frise, then having your dog’s coat professionally groomed on a regular basis is an essential part of maintaining your dog’s coat. Without regular grooming, your dog will be at risk for developing tangles, mats, and skin infections, as well as the potential for the coat to impede your dog’s vision with some breeds.

If you have a Labrador or a Vizsla, then having your dog groomed isn’t a necessity. While it can help remove undercoats for double-coated breeds like Labs, short and low-maintenance coats can usually be managed at home without professional help if you’re committed to it.

man grooming golden retriever dog
Photo Credit: SB Arts Media, Shutterstock

How Much Does Professional Dog Grooming Cost?

The cost of professional grooming services can vary widely between locations, groomers, and dogs. You may be able to get all of your dogs’ nail trims done for $15 each, even though some dogs are small and others are large. However, you are extremely unlikely to pay the same amount for a bath or full groom on a small and a large dog. You are also almost certainly not going to pay for a groom on a simple coat and a high-maintenance coat, even if the dogs are the same size.

Always check with your groomer beforehand to get an estimate of their services if you are concerned about or unsure of the cost. Keep in mind that if your dog’s coat is complex due to matting or medical conditions, then the cost is likely to increase, potentially beyond the estimate the groomer might have given you when they didn’t realize the extent of the problem. You are paying groomers for their time and expertise in managing your dog’s coat, and it’s important that you pay them fairly.

Here’s an idea of what you might pay to have your dog groomed:

Short/Single-density Coat Short/Double-density Coat Long Straight Coat Curly Coat Matted Coat
Small Breed $25–$40 $25–$45 $40–$90 $50–$120 $100+
Medium Breed $35–$50 $35–$60 $40–$95 $50–$120 $100+
Large Breed $50–$75 $55–$80 $60–$100 $70–$145 $125+
Giant Breed $60–$90 $65–$100 $75–$125 $95–$175 $150+

Additional Costs to Anticipate

One cost you may not have realized is customary is providing a tip for your groomer, much like you would for a massage or service in a restaurant. While this isn’t common in many places in the world, tipping for services is considered polite and a show of appreciation in the United States.

You should also consider the costs that you may incur by maintaining your dog’s coat between visits. Usually, a brush and bottle of dog shampoo will last a long time, so these extra costs are often minimal.

dog grooming
Photo Credit: Peakstock, Shutterstock

How Often Should I Have My Dog Groomed?

The frequency of grooming is 100% dependent on your dog’s coat and your willingness to maintain it at home. If you have a dog with a high-maintenance coat that you aren’t willing to brush between visits, then your dog likely needs to be professionally groomed every 3–4 weeks. If you provide appropriate grooming maintenance at home, then you may be able to push grooming visits out to 6–8 weeks or more, depending on the coat. Your groomer will be able to guide you in the necessary frequency for your dog.

If your dog has a low-maintenance coat, grooming is often not a necessity, so how frequently you have services performed is dependent on your preferences. If you want your dog bathed weekly but don’t want to do it yourself, a weekly trip to the groomer will work for you. Double-coated dogs can do well with grooming services when they are shedding between the season changes, although this is usually not a requirement.

Does Pet Insurance Cover Dog Grooming?

In almost all situations, pet insurance will not cover grooming services. If your dog has a broken toenail or a hotspot requiring a shave down, then pet insurance may help cover these costs, but only because they are considered medical problems and not grooming services.

Very few pet insurance companies may cover necessary grooming. This is usually for dogs that have significant skin problems and that may need the coat out of the way to support healing or prevent further infection. However, don’t count on your pet insurance to cover this because the vast majority of pet insurance companies don’t cover medical or required grooming services.

What to Do For Your Dog’s Coat Between Grooms?

Talk to your groomer about how you can best maintain your dog’s coat between visits. The specific needs will vary between dogs. Generally, brushing once or twice weekly, sometimes more frequently, is a good way to maintain the coat between visits. If you are comfortable with it and your dog is cooperative, then nail trims and baths can also be done at home between visits.

It is important to understand, though, that if your dog has mats and tangles, bathing them is likely to worsen these issues, and potentially cause more issues by trapping moisture on the skin. Bathing mats will not remove them and will likely increase the amount of matting or tangles. If your dog is matted, the mats will need to be carefully removed by a groomer, either by picking the mat loose or shaving, which is necessary with serious mats.

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Conclusion

There you have it! If you have a dog in need of some grooming, this post should give you a good idea of what you can expect to pay. Of course, these prices can change based on many factors, so it is always best to call your groomer and have them give you a quote if you’re looking for an exact number.

See also:


Featured Image Credit: Dmytro Zinkevych, Shutterstock

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