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Fleas and Ticks on Dogs in the Northeast

What do dog parents in the Northeast — including the mid-Atlantic states like New York and Pennsylvania, and New England stares like Massachusetts — have to know about fleas and ticks on their canines?

Kellie B. Gormly  |  Apr 7th 2018


The northeastern United States — including the mid-Atlantic states like New York and Pennsylvania, and New England stares like Massachusetts — has plenty of grass, woods, trees, autumn leaves and winter snow.

Fleas here can live year-round, even in the icy wintertime, when a host like a raccoon could carry the bugs. But, like everywhere, the warmer months give parasites the best biting and infesting opportunities, says Matthew Frye, entomologist with New York State Integrated Pest Management Program, Cornell University.

Fleas on dogs in the Northeast

Two dogs peeing outside.

What should dog parents in the Northeast know about fleas and ticks? Photography by Heinz Teh / Shutterstock.

Fleas breed in shady, moist places outside with exposed soil. Key spots might be under porches and decks, so beware of your dog hiding in these areas, Frye says.

Ticks on dogs in the Northeast

The most common tick in the northeast is the black-legged tick, also known as the deer tick. There’s also the lone star tick, a southern species that has been making its way north, and the American dog tick, also known as the wood tick. Black-legged ticks prefer moist, dark habitats like forested areas. American dog ticks like a sunny field with tall grass. Lone star ticks can be anywhere.

The peak activity for ticks — which like to congregate in leaf litter — is in the spring, with lots of baby ticks, and the fall with the adults. Summertime ticks are less active because of the heat.

Preventing fleas and ticks on dogs in the Northeast

If you keep your grass trimmed, which keeps the moisture level down, you’re not likely to have ticks in your lawn.

In New England, dog owners should especially stay on top of prevention efforts. Black-legged deer ticks are the biggest and most common tick threat in October, according to Anchor Animal Hospital in Dartmouth, Massachusetts. The clinic’s website cautions people not to assume that ticks die after the first frost and don’t bite in winter.

More recommendations for preventing fleas and ticks on dogs:

Thumbnail: Photography by Dora Zett / Shutterstock. 

It’s Flea and Tick Week sponsored by Andis on Dogster.com. Stay tuned for more tips on how to keep your dog and household safe from fleas and ticks!