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What Kind of Person Steals a Dog’s Wheelchair?

If you leave a bicycle on your front lawn, even in a pleasant leafy neighborhood like Dave Feeney's, you might not expect it to be...

Maria Goodavage  |  Jun 7th 2011


If you leave a bicycle on your front lawn, even in a pleasant leafy neighborhood like Dave Feeney’s, you might not expect it to be there when you go back outside.

But a little doggy wheelchair? Who would take a crippled dog’s only means of getting around?

That’s what Feeney and police would like to know after Feeney said he discovered his 12-year-old dog’s wheelchair was missing over the weekend. The theft rendered his dog, Lucky, unable to walk. Essentially it left him with two legs instead of four.

Lucky lost use of his hind legs a few years ago after he was struck by a car in Bogota, Colombia. That’s how he and Feeney first met.

Feeney tells the Boston Globe that he was doing humanitarian work there when he found Lucky dying in the street after an accident. “No one wanted to help him,” Feeney says. He was told to let the dog die and the garbage men would pick him up the next day. But Feeney could not.

So he got him to a vet and when the dog survived his massive internal bleeding, he named him Lucky.

“He has been the light of my life,” Feeney told the Globe.

Feeney, 63, who now gets by on social security money, said Lucky’s previous wheelchair cost him almost his entire monthly check. But that’s the kind of thing you do for a friend in need.

After his story went public, it wasn’t long before others started sniffing around for help for Lucky. It came quickly, in the form of a brand-new, custom-fitted wheelchair, donated by HandicappedPets.com.

“We wanted to do anything we could to right a wrong,” said HandicappedPets.com spokeswoman Lisa-Marie Mulkern. You can see Lucky’s new wheelchair in the video below. It’s pretty spiffy. Lucky seems to be living up to his moniker once again.

Disabled dog’s wheelchair stolen: MyFoxBOSTON.com

Update 7/8/11: I learned today that another company, Eddie’s Wheels, ended up donating the wheelchair that worked best for Lucky; it was a replacement of the customized Eddie’s one he had had before. Three cheers for both generous companies!