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Tips For Traveling With Your Pet

We're halfway through the summer, but there's still plenty of time to squeeze a trip in. If you plan on traveling and taking your pet...

Horst Hoefinger  |  Jul 21st 2009


We’re halfway through the summer, but there’s still plenty of time to squeeze a trip in.

If you plan on traveling and taking your pet with you here’s some good information from the Animal Health Care Center newsletter.

Traveling with your pet can be rewarding but challenging if not enough preparation has been made. Planning will help your trip go smoother and should include acquiring any paperwork that is needed, consideration of the temperatures to be experienced and how to deal with them, and obtaining equipment that will make the trip easier.

It is a good idea to first consult with your veterinarian. Make sure your pet is current on all vaccinations. Ask your pet’s doctor about the region to which you will be traveling and whether there are any diseases that require additional vaccines, i.e. Lyme or Lepto, or other measures, i.e. heartworm preventative. It is important your pet have identification; make sure the tag on the collar is current and the printing is legible. Your veterinarian should also implant a microchip into your pet as a form of permanent identification because collars can be lost easily.

Whether traveling by car or plane, you will need to take the current rabies certificate, a list of all other vaccines, and the microchip number. There is a law (rarely enforced), that any animal crossing a state line, by any means of transportation, needs a health certificate, with your veterinarian performing the exam within 30 days. Airlines do require a health certificate; most ask the exam be performed within 10 days of the flight. If your stay exceeds 10 days, you may need a second exam and health certificate for your return flight.

Not all airlines accept pets either in the cargo space or in the passenger section. You will need to call and ask for a reservation. If your pet will fit in a soft-sided crate that will fit under the seat ahead of you, it is better for your pet to travel in the passenger section. If the airline does accept pets, they usually will take only two per plane in the passenger section and they require one person to be traveling for each pet, i.e., one person can’t take two pets.

This is only part of the article, it can be read in its entirety on the Animal Health Care Center site. Located in Arlington, TX. it was was founded in 1980 and offers a full-service animal hospital, including grooming and boarding, committed to providing the highest standard of veterinary care for pets.

* Photo courtesy AHCC