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RuffWear's New Leash Models Are Must-Haves for Outdoorsy Folks with Strong Dogs

In February, Dogster's Julia Szabo reported on the best hardware for dog leashes. Here are two more leashes for people with hardcore pullers to consider.

 |  Mar 26th 2012  |   8 Contributions


A recent feature on spotting the safest dog leashes resulted in some interesting comments from Dogster readers -- including a surprisingly passionate defense of the snap hook that almost cost me the life of my German Shepherd dog, Desiree. The trigger snap leash that now keeps Desiree safely tethered to me is still a reader favorite, but now here are two additional types of leash hardware for your discerning consideration.

In the interest of comprehensive reporting, here is the scoop on safe leashes, part deux:

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A new breed of leash by RuffWear.

RuffWear, makers of gear for adventurous hounds and their equally outdoorsy humans, recently introduced two new leash models. One is called the Flat Out, which promises a strong, secure leash-collar connection via the Talon Clip (pictured below in the open and closed positions). The other is the Knot-a-Leash, which substitutes the traditional clasp with hardware that hardcore safety-conscious dog lovers will appreciate.

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The Talon Clip by RuffWear.

As reported here, many dog walkers -- professional and amateur alike --- prefer to place absolutely no trust in conventional leash hardware of any kind (especially when Mercury goes retrograde, which it does several times each year). These doubters prevent leash malfunction by attaching a dog's leash to his collar via a carabiner that's rated for mountain climbing (i.e., not the type of "carabiner" popularly used as a key chain).

The only trouble with this method, which I've used myself, is that the leash's existing hardware sticks straight up and out, occasionally banging into the dog's shoulder; it is,frankly, the opposite of aerodynamic.

RuffWear eliminates this clunky look by incorporating a locking carabiner into the design of the Knot-a-Leash that actually replaces the traditional clasp. (Attention, mountain climbers: The carabiner is only rated Max kg 1100 -- so please do not use it for anything other than dog-walking duty, okay?)

As always, Dogster readers, your feedback is welcome in the comments.

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