In the News
Share this image

Taking Fetch to the Next Level, a Dog Brings Home a Human Leg

The owner initially buried the limb because he didn't want to be blamed, but he eventually called police.

 |  Nov 12th 2013  |   5 Contributions


Many dogs are great at fetching stuff. It's one of the things that people find most appealing about them. Most dogs, however adorable, are relatively modest in their fetching ambitions. They stick to small, mundane objects such as sticks, balls, the occasional Frisbee or Aerobie.

And then there are those who take fetch to another level, such as Bill Flowers' dog Liberty. Usually Liberty brings home small things such as shoes. But last Tuesday, she presented him with a dismembered human leg.

Flowers, who lives on the Nisqually Reservation in southwestern Washington state, says that the leg was in good condition, although it had turned a grayish color.

"I examined it," he said. "I picked it up, and looked at the toes, and nothing -- none of the leg or foot was damaged. From the knee down it wasn't damaged at all."

Share this image
Bill Flowers buried the leg for four days after his dog Liberty fetched it from the nearby woods.

Flowers didn't call the police immediately; he was afraid that he'd be blamed somehow for whatever had happened, so he put the leg in a plastic bag and buried it.

"I was afraid to call," he told KOMO News. "I'm 93 years old. I didn't want to have to go to the pen for something I didn't do."

It was only four days later, after he told his daughter Cheryl about the leg, that he called the police at her urging.

When the police came out, they brought a team of their own search dogs and fitted Liberty with a GPS in case she led them to more human remains. And they found them. The search dogs turned up parts of a human skull, a pelvis, and a rib cage in the woods near Flowers' house.

Share this image
Liberty, outfitted with a snazzy new GPS collar.

As of now, all the police know is that they have a body. They have yet to identify the sex of the victim, that person's age or the cause of death.

Via KOMO News and Huffington Post

Contributions

Tip: Creating a profile and avatar takes just a minute and is a great way to participate in Dogster's community of people who are passionate about dogs.

blog comments powered by Disqus